Shopping & Style

Your comprehensive guide to the best shops, style, fashion, spas, beauty, gyms and fitness centres in Kuala Lumpur

Shopping

The best flower deliveries in KL

Shopping for a bouquet of flowers doesn't need to be a chore. Show that someone you care without even leaving your desk with our list of KL's top online florists for all occasions

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The best shops in KL

Shopping

Fashion

The best shops and boutiques for clothing, shoes, accessories and more.

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Shopping

Specialty

The best shops for everything in between – stationery, collectibles, eyewear and more.

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Shopping

Food and drink

From the best bakeries and grocers to wine houses, visit these places to stock up on all your food and drink needs.

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Shopping

Home, living and entertainment

The best furniture and home décor stores, as well as shops selling rare music records, graphic books and headphones.

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See more of the best shops in KL

Health and Beauty features

Health and beauty

Seven things you can do right now to make your life better

1. Sit less Over the past few years, research has increasingly cited long hours spent sitting down as a factor in the rising incidence of cardiovascular disease. One study compared adults who spent less than two hours a day in front of a screen (TV or other) with those who logged four or more hours of screen time. The latter had a nearly 50 percent increased risk of death and 125 percent increased risk of events associated with heart disease, such as chest pain and heart attacks. Worse still, a few hours in the gym doesn’t appear to significantly offset the impact. Build more standing and movement into your routine by standing while speaking on the phone or eating lunch, taking regular walking breaks at work, or using a standing desk in the office – better still, place your computer above a treadmill and walk while you work! 2. Learn to communicate Your emotional health and physical health work hand-in-hand – if you’re feeling rubbish, you’re not likely to go for a run (even though a dose of exercise-induced endorphins can actually help). And do you have problems in your relationship? 3. Eat more fat The right kind, that is. Incorporating the likes of avocados, nuts and coconut oil in your diet will offer a range of health benefits, from anti-inflammation and lower cholesterol to helping you shed body fat. Omega-3 fatty acids in particular can also help stave off heart disease and strokes, as well as reduce symptoms of hypertension and depression, among others. Pass the

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Things to do

High calorie food you should avoid

When you're trying to shift weight, you're faced with a minefield of diets and fads mixed in with good information and facts. It's hard to know what's good and what's bad all the time. We spoke to holistic health coach and nutritionist Kaya Peters to root out some of the foods people just don't know are bad for them.1. Dates and dried fruitAt a whopping 282 calories per 100g, each of these little morsels can be a hidden calorie bomb.Kaya says: 'In small amounts they can be very healthy, especially before workouts, but I don't recommend eating too much dried fruit as they can affect stable blood sugar levels. Dried cranberries and Goji berries are a safer option due to their sour properties.'2. CoffeeBe mindful, café-bought coffee can carry huge calorie implications, with additions like syrups, milk and sugar. A regular vanilla latte is about 221 calories. Instead, grab a long black with a dash of low fat milk. Kaya says: 'Excessive caffeine intake can drain the kidneys and adrenals and cause hormonal imbalances, which add to weight gain. Green tea is a great alternative, with zero calories and much lower caffeine content.' 3. White bread It's like cake, with no sugar. Really. One measly 100g piece of bread takes up around 350 calories of your daily intake. And to add to that, white bread has no real nutrients. Kaya says: 'If you're really serious about fitness, try to cut out bread as much as possible, except for the occasional gluten-free or wheat-free slice. However, be car

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Things to do

How to keep your New Year’s resolutions

A study by the University of Scranton in the US revealed that only eight percent of us manage to stick to the targets we set ourselves for the new year. So what are we doing wrong? Psychologist Dr Lavinia Ahuia shares tips on how to make them work for you. Why do so many of us set ourselves goals at year-end? We tend to reflect on the past year when it gets to December and this prompts us to reevaluate where we are, our regrets and where we think we might be heading. This leads to us creating goals – it’s similar to the diet mentality of ‘The diet starts tomorrow!’ The most common goals are wanting to quit ‘bad habits’ (such as smoking, procrastinating, eating junk food), trying to stick to ‘good habits’ (going to the gym, exercising or eating healthily), or simply making a pact to try to learn something new and different. Why do so many flounder? It’s not realistic for us to try and give up something overnight that has been a habit for a long time. Our habits are often born to fulfill some ‘functionality’ – ie, smoking as stress relief. It is unrealistic to quit a habit without recognising that underlying functionality and addressing it. What kind of goals are the ones that are most likely to fail? The simple answer to that is the big ones! When we set ourselves unrealistic, perfectionist-type challenges and expect it all to change overnight, it often leads to failure and disappointment. If you set the goal to go running five times a week, starting on New Year’s Day and

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Health and beauty

How to cope with hot weather hair

Chlorine, desalinated water and extreme temperatures can give your hair a battering. Are you struggling with sun-damaged hair? Don’t fret, the effects are reversible, according to Jamilla Paul, celebrity stylist. She gives us five top tips to combat common problems caused by the sun and maintain beautiful tresses. Hair loss The main culprit is desalinated water. Chlorine and calcium deposits in shower water strip hair of its natural oils, making the hair frizzy and brittle. They also stick to the hair on the inside, opening the follicles and crystallising. These mineral crystals grow and cause the protective cuticle to break off. The solution: Get a shower filter. This can remove 98 percent of the chlorine and other harmful chemicals in the water. It will also prevent dry tresses and sensitivity of the scalp. You’ll notice that your hair will be able to maintain its natural moisture and will become softer and healthier. Colour fade Shower water can also cause hair colour to fade. Chlorine strips the hair of its natural protective oils, causing it to dry out. This, in turn, breaks down the dye in the hair – ruining your expensive highlights. The solution: Get specially formulated shampoo. Using professional sulfate- and salt-free shampoos and conditioners will help maintain colour when used with a shower purifier. Frizzy hair Straw-like strands can occur from constant swimming and sunbathing. Even the straightest hair can suffer from a halo of frizz. The solution: Create a hai

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Health and beauty

How to develop a healthy mind

How many people honestly feel as optimistic as they did on January 1? As the world quickly settles back into its routines, gym attendance plummets, fast-food deliveries increase and reality kicks in. However, our New Year’s malaise may be a risk to more than our toned physiques. It might put a healthy mindset into jeopardy too. Some people remain imprisoned within their own shells for months or years, immersed in toxic thinking or environments. Despite this, in both personal and professional circumstances, we still demand clear thought and flawless decision-making in the most critical of situations. Would we make such expectations of our bodies? To attempt a marathon without training would obviously be ludicrous. However, we push our minds for much more. Some people even expect perfection. Psychologist Marie Jahoda identified six characteristics of ‘ideal’ mental health, including adapting to the environment and being resistant to stress. However, when improving our mindset – as with our bodies – we must be realistic. Aiming for excellence, not perfection, is healthy. An unhealthy fear We all face difficult moments and having the occasional ‘crazy’ or unhealthy thought is not unusual. While navigating life’s inevitable peaks and troughs alone, we may not recognise ourselves as we condemn those we feel criticise us. We may question our own ‘inferiority’ in comparison to others. A room full of avid conversation and smiling faces is often perceived as a sign of psychologically

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Health and beauty

Time Out's guide to sun protection

A combination of strong sun, high temperatures and humidity puts your skin at a higher risk,’ says Samar Maatouk, a cosmetic skincare specialist. She explains that as a result she normally advises people to avoid being in the sun during peak hours, which occur between 10am and 4pm. If you insist on going out, she continues, ‘wear a hat, sun-protective clothing and sunglasses.’ Of course, some sun worshippers won’t be deterred, in which case Samar underlines the risks in the case of repeated or overexposure. ‘There is a tendency for your skin to turn dry and lose its elasticity, so fine lines and wrinkles become more visible,’ she warns. ‘Freckles and skin pigmentation appear on exposed skin, causing hyper-pigmentation, in which the chemical melanin plays an important role in darkening various parts of the skin. The most dangerous problem is skin cancer, and ultraviolet radiation emitted from the sun is the main cause of this.’ Sun cream is the main way to shield your skin, but surprisingly few people understand how sun protection works and how to apply it. Confused? Take note of the following… Beware of both UVA and UVB rays While UVAs are the ageing (wrinkling) rays, UVBs are the burning (skin cancer) rays. Most sun protection takes care of UVB (the SPF figure refers to your protection from UVB rays), but you need to protect against UVA too. Look for the words ‘broad spectrum’ on products, and look at the ingredients. If you see ‘avobenzone’ or ‘zinc oxide’, you’re UVA saf

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