Restaurants in Bastille

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Waly Fay

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

The venue is elegantly simple, the lighting is moody and the hi-fi is set on 'world music'. Welcome to Waly Fay, where those in the know come to dine on dishes from across West Africa and the Antilles. Regulars navigate the menu of accra, boudin, mafé, thiep, yassa and n'dole cuisines with ease, while newbies are guided along by the helpful staff.Falling squarely in the latter category, we played it safe by first ordering the trademark dish of West Africa, aloco: fried plantain served with fish dumplings and a citrus-tomato sauce. The plantain was as succulent as it was copious, serving as the perfect accompaniment to the main courses: grilled sea bream seasoned with tomato and persil and served with rice (sublime), and chicken served with pecan nuts, coleslaw and sweet potato chips. Unable to make room for dessert, we instead ordered some wine (the only course that doesn't have its roots in Africa) and ended up with a decent bottle of chardonnay – a lovely grace note to a throughly enjoyable meal (€65 for two).

  1. 6 rue Godefroy Cavaignac, 11e
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© Time Out / Oliver Knight

L'Ecailler du Bistrot

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 3/4

With its beautiful old model sailing boats, lobsters, shells and bottles of sand everywhere, l’Ecailler du Bistrot feels a little like a fishing boat during the calm after the storm.Decide between, for example, incredible platters of fruits de mer, oyster selections or the lobster set menu – 12 oysters and a half lobster with fries and pudding. Aside from shellfish, there are also things like scallop carpaccio, turbot and sole meunière – but most people will plump for a gargauntuan plate of crustaceans, washed down with an excellent bottle of Cheverny blanc (€20). The glorious ritual of cracking, hulling, shelling and excavating takes you through winkles, whelks, clams, grey shrimp, cockles, belon oysters, hard and soft-shell crabs and pink shrimps, all beautifully presented and fresh. It’s generous and reasonably priced for Parisians used to paying silly money for shellfish (€76 for two), and everything that comes with it works as well – bread, butter and mayonnaise from attentive but not overweening service.After the battle, wash your hands in lemon and hot water and head for the excellent desserts – roasted figs, baked apples with salted caramel. You'll leave happily humming Molly Malone. This restaurant serves one of Time Out's 50 best dishes in Paris. Click here to see the full list.

  1. 22 rue Paul Bert, 11e
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© TR / Time Out

La Pulpéria

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

The Meat at La Pulpéria comes with a capital M, served in a noisy, welcoming little dining room and whipped up in white-tiled kitchen by talented Argentinean chef Fernando Di Tomaso and his South American team. The menu changes daily, but on our visit it all began with crunchy calf’s sweetbreads accompanied by a few girolles mushrooms and a cep sauce, and a pretty cod ceviche surrounded with fine slices of sweet potato, avocado purée and a splash of lemon juice. Each flavour sung out, while perfectly complementing the others on the plate.Then the mains (vegetarians look away now). A bloody, magnificent churrasco cut of beef, just recently arrived from its native pampas, served with rissole potatoes and garlicky, spicy chimichurri sauce. There was also the pluma ibérique, a piece of pork wrapped in a very fine layer of well-flavoured fat and pan-fried then grilled, producing a delicious dish, so tender in the middle that it almost seemed not to be pork. Both dishes were generous, precise and seriously good.The prices might seem a bit high at first (starters from €10 to €12, mains €25 to €30, desserts around €10), but for the quality of the products and the cooking, it’s really very reasonable. The portions are huge, too; we were left mournfully contemplating the splendid cheese board, incapable of fitting in anything resembling a dessert, not even the promising dulce de leche. This restaurant serves one of Time Out's 50 best dishes in Paris. Click here to see the full list.

  1. 11 rue Richard Lenoir, 11e
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Caffé dei Cioppi

Caffé dei Cioppi

Caffé dei Cioppi

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Lightening struck when this minuscule Italian trattoria, run by Fabrizio and Federica Mancioppi, opened three years ago. And it still wows today thanks to outstanding dishes like sausage and red wine risotto, garlicky shellfish linguine, Italian charcuterie, tangy Sicilian lasagnes, creamy burrata and sbrisolona – almond biscuits dipped in mascarpone cream (don’t tell the chef, but they taste good when dunked in red wine too!). Get there early if you want a table; or be prepared to queue. The restaurant (which spills into the narrow passage in the summer months) has space for just 20 people.

  1. 159 rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, 11e
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© Time Out / AE

Bones

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

This is one of Time Out's top 50 things to do in Paris this summer. Click here to see the full list. Youthful self-taught Aussie chef James Henry flexes his muscles, tattoos and chutzpah at this new venture where the ingredients are the stars of the show. Book several weeks in advance for the no-choice four-course tasting menu at €47 a head, served in the 25-seater dining room, or try the bar for craft beers, freshly-shucked oysters and homemade charcuterie.

  1. 43 rue Godefroy Cavaignac, 11e
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© Time Out

La Crêperie bretonne fleurie de l'épouse du marin

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 1/4
  • Critics choice

The spectacularly-named ‘flower-filled Breton crêperie run by a sailor's wife’ feels like the haunt of old sea-dogs, all wood, old posters, antique objects and postcards from all over the world, giving the place an immediate charm – a little piece of the ancient Brittany region of Armorica in the 11th.The menu offers a wide, if not exhaustive, choice of crêpes and galettes – the origin of the ingredients is carefully marked, as if to reassure those traumatised by the indigestible crêpes sold along the Rue Oberkampf. Prices range between €2.70 for a buckwheat pancake with butter to €10.40 for a version with goat’s cheese, bacon and eggs. The Bretons know what they’re doing with crêpes – this last was crispy and melting at the same time, full of soft goat’s cheese perfectly matched with salty butter. The picture is completed with a good bottle of cider at €7 and a fantastic classic sweet crêpe, the ‘Gwenn ha Du’ with home made chocolate sauce and a scoop of vanilla ice cream (€6.50). No doubt, this friendly corner of Brittany is a real find.

  1. 67 rue de Charonne, 11e
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© Unico

Unico

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4

Architect Marcelo Joulia and photographer Enrique Zanoni were wise enough to retain the vintage 1970s decor of this former butcher's shop when they opened their temple to Argentinian beef. Orange tiles and matching light fixtures provide the backdrop for the fashionable, black-dressed crowd that comes here for thick slabs of meat grilled over charcoal and served with a selection of sauces. If you find yourself hesitating, opt for the lomo (fillet) with chimichurri, a mild salsa - and don't forget to wash it down with Argentinian wine, a rarity in Paris.

  1. 15 rue Paul Bert, 11e
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DR

Amici Miei

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4

Amici Miei, (‘my friends’), is an authentic Sardinian trattoria, the sort that feeds you up with all the flavours of Italy. Carpaccio and salads compete for starters (€8 to €19), followed by generous pasta or risotto dishes (€12 to €21) and thin crust pizzas (€9 to €17). At dessert, special mention goes to the strawberry and basil panacotta. Marry it all together with a good wine from the transalpine selection, delivered by relaxed and efficient waiters. All this adds up to a place that’s never empty – with a bit of luck you’ll even see celebrities Romain Duris or Anna Mouglalis wrestle with their spaghetti. As a result, you need to arrive early – or the only slice of Italy you’ll be taking home will be inside a pizza box. This restaurant serves one of Time Out's 50 best dishes in Paris. Click here to see the full list.

  1. 44 rue Saint-Sabin, 11e
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DR / © Gentle Gourmet

Gentle Gourmet

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4

If vegetarian restaurants are on the rise in Paris, vegan can still be a challenge to track down. It’s a tough sell, especially in France: the savoir-faire and imagination required to produce good cooking without any animal products, including milk and eggs.This American enterprise does well. The sober black and white room, strung with origami shapes, happily looks more like a business lunch venue than a hippy hang-out. And on the menu, as well as the inevitable veggie burger, there are plenty of French-inspired dishes plus flavours from around the world, like Cajun tofu.We were intrigued by things like a soup with pumpkin, peppers and mushrooms, and a Moroccan salad with chickpeas, roasted carrots, pumpkin seeds and dried cranberries, which were both very well executed. In contrast, the tofu burger, with an over-smoked taste and slightly limp texture, was a bit of a let-down, as was the substitute cheese tart. Happily, a delicious bourginon stew with root vegetables saved the day. Portions are generous enough that you might not need dessert, though they offer vegan versions of all the classics – tarte tatin, crème brûlée, millefeuilles. Give the place time to even out the menu and push the kitchen a bit further, and it could be somewhere really good.

  1. 24 boulevard de la bastille, 12e
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© Time Out / RJ

Miss Lunch

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 1/4
  • Critics choice

Until the launch of her public cooking station, Miss Lunch was a clandestine cordon bleu cook at her supper club Lunch in the Loft. She still serves her inspired creations privately, but now also cooks in the Première Pression Provence boutique in the heart of the Aligre neighbourhood.From Belgium and Canada, her Egyptian-South African family made frequent trips to the Italian island Pantelleria, all important creative cooking influences on Miss Lunch. Creativity that has stood her in good stead here, where cooking smells are forbidden by the lease – so it was goodbye oven and stove, hello microwave.Donning her apron, Miss Lunch took on the challenge, working with the constraints and surprising her guests with inventive and skilful menus. From her open kitchen, she prepared for us a tomato soup spiced up with Cayenne pepper, an oeuf cocotte with broccoli purée, alouette sans tête (beef stuffed with pork) and a cheese plate (brie and Neufchâtel, lamb’s lettuce and endive, excellent chutney and fig confit).Then the desserts: an authentic apple charlotte and a plum and chocolate cake, all washed down with good wines at reasonable prices (€24 or €26 a bottle, €4 or €5 a glass). The food is great value too (€15 for a set menu of starter and main or main and dessert) – since she came out into the open, Miss Lunch’s cooking hasn’t lost any of its charm. Proof that the best secrets are the ones you let slip.

  1. 3 rue Antoine Vollon, 12e
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L'Ebauchoir

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4

The slightly battered back streets of the 12th arrondissement don’t immediately suggest a good quality bistro specialising in seasonal, local produce. But l’Ebauchoir (it means ‘the chisel’, presumably a nod to its authentically agrarian connections) is a valuable find, with its roots firmly in the terroir, or origins, of its locally-sourced ingredients.Genuinely friendly waiters welcome you into a long room that’s all elegant floor tiles and dark wood tables, with a bustling bar twinkling in golden lamp-light beneath jolly hand-painted murals of people having a good old knees-up. In summer, be aware that if you reserve a table on the terrasse, you’ll find yourself rather on the grottily atmospheric trottoir outside, as mopeds zoom back and forth in front of the neighbouring Latin dance clubs and the restaurant staff zip between their tables and the wine bar over the road. But this is all part of the fun.The seasonal menu is short and sweet (the wine list rather longer, but with a good price range and a ‘bottle of the month’ for the indecisive). Summer starters brought a perfectly poached egg on a bed of fresh peas with a truffle coulis, and pan-fried duck foie gras offset by a sweet surprise of apricot and lavender sauce – which might sound like a potpourri-flavoured disaster, but was a slightly tart, fruity complement to the crisped, creamy liver. These were followed by rose-pink slices of roasted lamb slicked with rocket pesto and walnuts, and soft rounds of griddled beef

  1. 43-45 rue de Citeaux, 12e
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Le Petit Cheval de Manège

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 3/4

This little restaurant near the Bastille offers high-end tapas-style starters, mains and desserts. Crunchy caramelised pig ears with fennel confit share the menu with smoked herring with watermelon gaspacho and marinated cucumber, and chanterelle ragout with steamed egg, radish and ratatouille. The prawn ceviche with heirloom tomatoes, olives, avocados and currants is a successful mixture of slightly acidic sweetness and saltiness and the octopus with Venere rice and yellow peach is original and succulent. The little dishes are attractively presented but quite expensive for their size (mostly between €8.50 and €13.50) so expect a steep bill, or stick to the three-dish set menu at €16.The menu changes regularly, promising new and daring recipes every season. The team is very welcoming and the room pretty and pleasant with its red decor and period mosaic tiled floor. In summer the sunny little terrace provides a peaceful haven away from the busy traffic.

  1. 5 rue Froment, 11e
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Septime

Septime

Septime

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 2/4

The Faubourg Saint-Antoine area has been making waves on the food scene for quite a while: Rue de Cotte, Rue Trousseau, the Marché d’Aligre and lots of other little streets offer an excellent range of good things to eat, and since the Rue Charonne's latest makeover, the area is more than ever on the up. Graphic arts bookshops and trendy boutiques proliferate, so it’s no surprise to fine Bertrand Grébaut’s latest restaurat venture here. A former pupil at Penninghen design school, the décor reflects his background: huge mirrors, industrial installations, antique flooring and furniture, reinforced concrete and bare wood, all designed by Julien Cohen & Co.The cooking is direct, pure, and serious. Raw horse mackerel with yoghurt and red cabbage was superb, as invigorating as the velouté of eggs, mushrooms and chicken foie gras was comforting. Saint-Jean mackerel with sweet and padron peppers was perfectly cooked, Iberico ham and pumpkin was tender and delicious. Dessert was a lovely mixture of apples, fromage blanc, honey and thyme. It's all topped off with charming service and a lunch menu at €26 including a glass of wine (when we visited, Romorantin 2010 by Frantz Saumon or an Argentinean Malbec, Amalaya 2009). Evening menu at €55.

  1. 80 rue de Charonne, 11e
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DR

Rino

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4

For a small restaurant, Rino has attracted big press since opening in early 2010. French food critics have unanimously been nodding their approval of young Italian chef Giovanni Passerini’s 26-seat diner near Paris’ trendy Bastille quarter. If you’re smart enough to bag a red banquette at Rino, anticipate being wowed by Passerini’s uniquely modern and mainly organic take on gastro Italian cooking at almost bargain prices. Lunch is a crazily good deal at under 20 euros for two courses, and just over for three. Pricier and even more thrilling tasting menus are served to an adoring dinner crowd. Wines are Italian and French, mainly organic or biodynamic, and all shy of 40 euros. The kudos for being at Rino? Pretty much priceless.

  1. 46 rue Trousseau, 11e
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© Time Out

Little Hanoï

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 1/4
  • Critics choice

A clean and simple modern restaurant with an open kitchen, Little Hanoï (or its big brother, Paris-Hanoï at 74 rue de Charonne) is a breath of fresh air. Delicately scented dishes arrive on your table still steaming, fresh out of the oven and free from MSG – huge salads, bo bun, pho, beef with onions and much more. There are some nice touches, like the mint leaves in the water carafe, and the excellent egg rolls and deep-fried prawns that can be ordered by the piece (€1 and €0.90), and dishes costs around €10, with rice and vegetables included.There is a price, however: patience. You can’t reserve, so you’ll have to queue (which goes easier with a Beerlao in hand). Use the time to admire the poise of the staff, who manage to maintain their good humour in the face of the hungry crowds.

  1. 9 rue de Mont-Louis, 11e
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© Time Out / Oliver Knight

La Galoche d'Aurillac

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4

A loft-like ambiance, with rows of neatly polished and arranged clogs hanging from the rafters. It’s kitsch but completely self-assured, and will appeal to nostalgics. One you’ve slid onto the one of the large scratched leather banquettes, you can focus your attention on the short menu (set formulas at €25 and €35). A lot of it comes from the Auvergne, but not all, aiming to satisfy the trendier local clientele. The starter portions are big enough to floor a champion racehorse, with coddled eggs filled with blue Auvergne cheese, a charcuterie board big enough to share, house foie gras and beautifully seasoned herring with fried potatoes. For main dishes it’s the same story; braised beef cheek and a tartlet rich in Saint-Nectaire cheese, veal escalope and grilled sardines. Come here with bold, hungry friends, and come back for the traditional Auvergne tripou (veal tripe and stomach) if nothing else – though the wine bar and charcuterie to go are both also pretty tempting. This restaurant serves one of Time Out's 50 best dishes in Paris. Click here to see the full list.

  1. 41 rue de Lappe, 11e
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© GP / Time Out

Cotte Rôti

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 3/4

Nicolas Michel is constantly reinventing his ‘gastro-bistro’. The dining room was completely re-done in 2011, adding a welcoming area of communal tables, and more recently the kitchen got a thorough wash-and-brush-up. But the intention is not to put on airs – it’s still a chalkboard-menu sort of place, with an easy-going atmosphere to match. In the evenings, there’s a single menu at €39 that includes starter, main and dessert. We began with a chartreuse of crab on a consommé of prawns and Vichyssoise cream, followed by a monkfish fillet in a black olive crust with green beans, chorizo and wild garlic, and to finish, a dark chocolate ‘surprise’ with blueberries and pistachio ice cream. All achieved a balance between refinement and simplicity on the plate, and the house specialities of casserole and seven hours slow cooked shoulder of lamb looked good on our neighbours’ tables. The wine list concentrates largely on the expensive treasures of the Côtes du Rhône region, but it is possible to find a few (but not nearly enough) more affordable quality wines – a René Rostaing white from the Languedoc punched above its weight for €36. In the end, this restaurant is something like a great vintage: the years that pass give it a greater and greater charm.

  1. 1 rue de Cotte, 12e
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© Time Out

Les Crocs

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

The short kilometre from the Bastille Métro to Les Crocs feels a lot longer when you’re pelting through the rain, but when we finally made it, the welcome was restorative as a mug of hot chocolate. In the open kitchen, the owner – with a white beard and significant paunch – was working the ovens. The waiter came straight from setting up the 20-odd tables in the dining room (book ahead if you can) and offered a chat and a glass of wine while we dried off. The menu – a little checklist that also serves as your bill when you’re done – is brief, but like the staff, the produce used is high quality, with taste and character.Vegetarians will have to avoid this one, though – when we visited the menu was all charcuterie and red meat. There were rillettes, pâté and a whole load of cured meats for starters (€4 to €8). Then beef, duck confit, a salad ­à la Landaise with duck, apple and asparagus, or horse steak cooked with garlic (€12 to €16). Around us, the room filled up quickly and became raucous with laughter and talk. The wine list may well have something to do with this – it’s also short, but well priced and intelligently curated. Also, you can stick to half bottles on any vintage, by relying on the waiter and the kitchen to keep track of where you’ve got to. Which pretty much sums up the venue overall: authentic, generous and unpretentious.

  1. 14 rue de Cotte, 12e
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© GP / Time Out

Swann et Vincent

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4

With its Parisian bistro allure, this tiny Italian restaurant offering classic transalpine cuisine is nothing if not convivial. Sugared olives and charcuterie 'du pays' are served by Italian waiters who move the chalkboard from table to table across the tiled floors. The solid menu offers all you would expect: fish or pasta of the day with a choice of sauce, veal escalope, gorgonzola tagliatelle. We appreciated that the warm herb bread was served throughout the meal. The look and feel of this place, where the crammed together tables are conducive to meeting fellow diners, are exactly what one expects of a neighbourhood Italian. The only regret is that the menu is slightly predictable. But perhaps that is the price one pays at such a successful place which has for a very long time welcomed lovers of authentic Italian cuisine. To finish, a worthy tiramisu, coffee and a passable Orvietto by the half bottle, you come out having spent under €30 per person. It’s not a place worth shouting about, but it certainly does what it says on the tin.

  1. 12e
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© Time Out

Mamie Tevennec

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 1/4

This homely crêperie on the Rue Faidherbe is aptly named, combining as it does authentic Britanny cooking with rustic familial warmth. The buckwheat crêpes aren’t quite as high quality as one might wish, and the cider is an inferior supermarket version, but they are filling and very good by Parisian standards – from the complète – a touch bland – to the Brétonne (Guéméné sausage, egg, cheese and salad) via the slightly over-ambitious ‘Sur le port de Tevennec’, generously filled with smoked fish and marinated vegetables. The sweet crêpes save the day, the batter both meltingly soft and caramelised at the edges, with high quality toppings. The home made salted caramel butter and the lemon version dusted with brown sugar are superb (€7). All in all, Mamie Tevennec is a success, but more so if you come at lunch for the more affordable €10 set menu, when you’re more likely to forgive the weaknesses of the mains.

  1. 41 rue Faidherbe, 11e
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