Your ultimate guide to Kuala Lumpur

Discover the best Kuala Lumpur events, things to do, restaurants, music, film, art, theatre, nightlife and more...

Blog

Imbi Market opens at ICC Pudu

A first look at Imbi Market's new, spacious home at ICC Pudu

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Shopping

The best bookstores in KL

Live vicariously through your favourite characters at these best bookstores in the city

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Restaurants

Dishes to try at Time Out Dine Out

The infamous raindrop cake and more dishes to expect at our Japanese-themed urban picnic

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Restaurants

Unusual nasi lemak dishes in KL

For the adventurous nasi lemak lover looking for a different take on the country's pride and joy dish (nasi lemak pizza, gelato, cheesecake!), brave your tastebuds for these dishes in KL that taste almost like the real deal. Bring your appetite and an open mind.

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Things to do

10 things to do in KL this week

Our guide to the week's best events and recommended things to do

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What’s on this week in KL

Kultar's Mime

The Sikh Research Institute presents the stories of the Delhi Massacre adapated from its namesake poem by Sarbpreet Singh with text from Haim Bialik’s ‘In The City of Slaughter’. The group’s Malaysian tour is organised by Malaysian Young Sikh Leaders Initiative with proceeds going to selected community projects.

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'Most Likely to Succeed' screening

Watch this documentary by Greg Whiteley examining the American system of education and the shortcomings of the conventional education methods in the modern world. The screening is organised by 100% Project and Teach For Malaysia. Ticket price is inclusive of dinner for Saturday’s screening and light snacks on Sunday.

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Restaurants Buy tickets

Time Out Dine Out: Japan in KL

After a successful debut last year, Time Out KL's urban picnic returns to the Avenue K rooftop this May 28 with a Japanese theme featuring food from some of the city's popular Japanese restaurants and cafés. Like the previous Time Out Dine Out, the RM65 entry fee entitles you to sample portions from all vendors. Watch this space for more updates.  Note: Only pork-free food will be served.

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Things to do

Radio Malaya & Seladang Sounds

As Chuah Thean Teng searched for a Malayan identity through his batik paintings, music in Malaya was also searching for its own voice. Composer and author Saidah Rastam talks about the influence of Radio Malaya in the 1950s and how the sound of a new nation was created in this three-hour programme at Ilham Gallery.

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New restaurants in KL

Restaurants

Kayra

Try a different spectrum of Indian cuisine at Kayra – the original restaurant in Johor first opened in 1949 – Keralan cuisine, to be exact. Kayra (derived from ‘keram’, which means ‘coconut palm tree’ in Malayalam, Kerala’s indigenous language) pays homage to coconut through its menu of authentic Keralan fare, where an assortment of thali sets, desserts and curries incorporates the use of coconut, be it grated, crushed or roasted. Check it out during dinner for a more varied menu than its lunch sets, but go early as Kayra fills up quickly.

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Restaurants

Tivoli

Klangite pet lovers, put that road trip to KL’s pet cafés on hold because Klang's first dog-filled pet-friendly café is in town (the dogs are nearer and you get to skip the traffic jam). A stone’s throw from AEON Bukit Tinggi and on the same row as PappaRich, Tivoli by Adrian Gan and Danielle Chin is an extension of the Pets Trails pet shop (just a couple of doors away) and also offers pet hotel services as well as a furkid spa.  As you enter, you’ll be greeted by host poodles Keiko and Ichigo. If you’re lucky, the whole troop (including Snow White the West Highland White Terrier, Taro Ball the Pomeranian, and Brownie and Coffee the poodles) will be there. Warm lighting and black walls highlight kitschy dog-themed accessories dotted about; there’s an all-white bust of a pug, soft toy dogs, a large mural of cutesy people and their dogs, and a ‘photoshoot’ wall with phrases like ‘best friend’, ‘together forever’ and ‘loving’. A glass wall separates the café from the pet hotel and spa, but you can take a peek to see dogs snoozing in spacious rooms or getting a grooming. True to the cheerful spirit of its Danish amusement park namesake, Tivoli, which opened in April, has a merry vibe, cute dogs in cute garb and friendly staff. Standard pet-friendly café rules apply: All dogs have to wear a diaper (if you forget, the café provides diapers for a fee), close the door behind you so the dogs don’t bolt out, and clean up after your furry one.  If you’re thinking of bringing your Si

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Restaurants

Tomorrow People

Hartamas may be more of a Japanese turf when it comes to food. Plaza Damas itself has three prominent Japanese restaurants: Uokatsu, Kushiyaki Kuni and Rakuzen. However, if it’s coffee and brunch food you’re looking for, there’s Tomorrow People. The café tries to stay low-profile – no Instagram hype, no Facebook page. The food here is brunch fusion; think gula Melaka French toast, opah-style spaghetti and beef potato pancakes reminiscent of begedil (called 'Eggs Yang Degil'). If you need something light and sweet to start the day, get the ‘Toast Manis’ – we like it for the homemade gula Melaka cream and pandan buttercream slathered against the thick, crunchy toast. Or if you’re being (really) adventurous, there’s tapai pancake, topped with homemade ice cream for an additional RM4. The ice cream flavours range from sweet potato to sago, depending on what they find at the market. As for coffee, the café uses beans by Artisan Roast.

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Restaurants

The Glass House

The floor-to-ceiling windows at The Glass House certainly help lend character to its name – the windows span two storeys and let in lots of light. Headed by Kiwi barista Glen (formerly of Closer), The Glass House serves up a well-curated list of beans (think Canberra brand Ona, Taiwan-based Simon Hsieh, Tanamera from Jakarta) and expert brews. Plans for a coffee roasting facility are in the pipeline. For dessert, one might be tempted by the chocolate cookies, but we say go for the gluten-free Belgian chocolate and sea salt cake instead.

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Latest interviews

Music

The Observatory

The Observatory is a Singaporean band – but they’re not just any Singaporean band, they’re the Singaporean band. Since their formation in 2001, the avant garde art rock act has become one of the longest-lasting bands in the country; they choose not to stick with a sound that works, but instead reinvents and refines their sonic craft with each record, having inhabited – and having shed – various genres, from folk electronic to progressive rock. Theirs is the Singapore story: its line-up is a rotating one which gives rise to its continuous artistic evolution, with members made of Singapore’s most significant music acts, although the core group of Leslie Low and Vivian Wang remains. Cheryl Ong and Yuen Chee Wai have joined the ranks of The Observatory’s current installment and the band released their eighth album ‘August Is The Cruellest’ in February. We catch up with them ahead of their set for Urbanscapes this month. It’s been said that your latest and eighth album ‘August Is The Cruellest’ is your most ‘sonically-rich record’ since 2010’s ‘Dark Folke’. Is it a return to form of sorts?Leslie Low: Listeners would have to be the judge of that. I think of this as bare bones: lots of string vibrations, urgent and relentless. The pulse and the riff. It’s the blues [in the key of] C. You reference TS Eliot in this album (‘April is the cruellest month’ from ‘The Waste Land’, and ‘Four Quartets’, etc). Certainly the man, who began as an outsider, became the most celebrated poet of th

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Film

Brie Larson

Brie Larson spoke to a trauma specialist and a nutritionist, and took a month-long vow of silence before playing the role of Joy (based on the book ‘Room’), who is kidnapped by a stranger, locked in a dingy garden shed and repeatedly raped. After two years of captivity, Joy gives birth to a son, Jack (Jacob Tremblay), who is five when we drop into their lives as Joy is plotting escape. You play a woman, Joy, who has been locked away for seven years. How did you get your head around how those years had affected her, physically and mentally? It took me almost nine months and a lot of brainpower. Even just thinking about the wear and tear to her body. It’s not as simple as thinking: how long would her hair have grown? You have to realise that she doesn’t get any vitamin D. Her nutrition is poor. She doesn’t have any shampoo. In those circumstances hair doesn’t keep growing – it dissolves and dries and falls out. She’s also given birth to a son. How did you begin to understand what it would be like to become a mother in captivity? I took a month off in silence at home. When you eliminate all stimuli, your brain is like: ‘Finally, we’ve got some space! I want to talk with you about something!’ And what did your brain want to talk to you about? I was reminded of my childhood when I was seven and my mom packed up our old Mercedes and we drove from Sacramento to Los Angeles because I wanted to be an actor. We moved into a studio, about twice the size of the room in ‘Room’. We had a b

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Film

Leonardo DiCaprio

'Hi, I’m Leo.’ In a hotel room in London, Leonardo DiCaprio walks over from the window where he’s been puffing on an electronic cigarette. He’s smiling. A good sign. The actor is famously private and once walked out on a journalist who was rude to him. At 41, he is no longer the impossibly beautiful boy he was in ‘Romeo + Juliet’ and ‘Titanic’. I’m more dazzled by his knitwear than his looks – he’s wearing a navy blue cashmere jumper so expensive and soft that I have to resist the temptation to stroke his arm. DiCaprio is a man with a lot to smile about. 2016 belongs to him. After being nominated four times for an Oscar, there’s a very strong chance he will walk up the aisle in February to pick up the Best Actor award for ‘The Revenant’. The film is set in 1823, and he plays real-life frontiersman Hugh Glass, left for dead in the Rocky Mountains by his hunting party. Directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu (‘Birdman’), it’s a brutal, raw revenge drama that puts Glass through the wringer: attacked by a bear; mauled by Tom Hardy (who, let’s face it, is scarier than a grizzly); buried alive; so cold he sleeps in the still-steaming carcass of a horse. Yes, it’s acting – but DiCaprio also lived it. The nine-month shoot in Canada and Argentina was so tough that some of the crew have described it as ‘a living hell’. Everyone talks about how down-to-earth DiCaprio is. I’m not sure that’s true. How down-to- earth can you be when you’ve been one of the world’s most famous actors sinc

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Film

John Boyega

Right now, John Boyega might be the happiest guy in the universe. He’s 23, he was hand-picked by director JJ Abrams to appear in ‘Star Wars – The Force Awakens’, set to be the biggest movie of the decade, and now everyone on Earth wants a piece of him. Dressed to the nines in designer clobber and slumped in a chair in one of London’s swankiest hotels, the young Brit grips my hand and grins like a lottery winner. ‘You know when you sit down with an actor and you ask how they are and they say they’re good?’ he bellows. ‘I’m genuinely good!’ Boyega’s casting in ‘Star Wars’ as Finn – a character rumoured to be a foot soldier who deserts his Stormtrooper platoon to join the rebel resistance – came as a surprise to almost everyone when it was announced last year. It was followed by a slew of comment pieces, many of them portraying him as a kid from the mean streets, cut from the same guns ’n’ gangs cloth as his character Moses in the 2011 British alien invasion flick ‘Attack the Block’. All of which is, of course, complete nonsense: Boyega is just a damn fine actor, fierce and charming in the proud British tradition of Albert Finney, Bob Hoskins and Tom Hardy. But there’s an openness to him too, especially in person: a hyperactive enthusiasm and skyrocketing self-confidence that’s impossible not to warm to. It’s a unique combination, and it makes Boyega the perfect fit for the gritty-but-giddy fairytale world of ‘Star Wars’. The fact that he’s a lightsaber-swinging, action-figure

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The best of Kuala Lumpur

Restaurants

Top 40 restaurants and cafés

The Time Out KL Food 40: Our monthly guide to the best places to eat in town, reviewed anonymously by critics.

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Things to do

The best tourist attractions in KL

Whether you're a first-time visitor looking for things to do (without resorting to too many clichés), or a local who just wants to play tourist for a day, here are ten ways to earn your tourist badge in KL.

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Restaurants

The 15 best dishes in KL

This year, we look at the top entries that speak to our larger KL culinary scene, inspire our midnight cravings, and demonstrate real respect for flavour. Here are the dishes that best stood out in 2015.

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Restaurants

The best coffee shops in KL

KL's coffee culture is an expanding landscape of imported beans, state-of-the-art machines, hip baristas, and silky smooth pours. Here are the best coffee shops in KL that call the shots.

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Restaurants

Time Out KL Food Awards winners

Every year, we ask you to put forward your nominations for the best cafés and restaurants that deserve the highest recognition in the Kuala Lumpur dining scene. You’ve voted, and here are the award results.

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Restaurants

Best cafés in KL

You’ve got to admit that a trip to a good café sets you in a cheery mood – the sun-soaked space, glorious sunny side ups and that tingling dose of caffeine. The Time Out KL team maps out the best cafés for every occasion, from Instagram eye candies to the brunch of champions.

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