Your ultimate guide to Kuala Lumpur

Discover the best Kuala Lumpur events, things to do, restaurants, music, film, art, theatre, nightlife and more...

Music

Lessons from love songs

Need some sound love advice? We dissect eight love songs to extract the hidden life lessons from each

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What’s on this week in KL

Music

Sons of the Soil at Merdekarya

Formerly known as Brian Gomez & The Have-Nots, Sons of the Soil is devoted to penning blue rock songs about GST and other current affairs.

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Film

Film screening: A Castle in Italy

Nominated for the Palme d’Or at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival, the third feature from the Italian-French actress-turned-director is a semi-autobiographical ode to love and death. Louise, once from a powerful Northern Italian industrialist family, is set on leading a single life in Paris. After meeting Nathan however, she develops strong feelings for him and begins to open her heart.

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Music

Spy vs Spy

Arnie Roth celebrates the big bad world of Bond, as well as works by John le Carré. Come for a night of iconic film themes, such as ‘Goldfinger’, ‘Homeland’, ‘Mission: Impossible’, ‘The Spy Who Came In From The Cold’ and ‘The Pink Panther’.

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Art

The Kings of Wishful Thinking

Contemporary artist Anurendra Jegadeva came up with the idea for this exhibition after a friend who collects banknotes showed him a rare 50 ringgit note missing the image of Duli Yang Maha Mulia Tuanku Abdul Rahman. Here, the artist places portraits of everyday Malaysians against the backdrop of the ringgit note.

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New restaurants in KL

Restaurants

Goodness Greens Café

Now that La Juiceria has established itself as one of the city's leading cold-press juice brands, its next mission, apparently, is to promote clean eating with the opening of its first offshoot, Goodness Greens, where you can have vegan-friendly dishes, customisable salads, superfood-packed smoothie bowls and even rice bowls and pastas, alongside the juices that started it all of course. Part of the appeal of Goodness Greens is its customisable salads – and by customisable, we mean you get to pick everything from your base (brown rice, salad leaves, romaine lettuce or warm potatoes) and mains (choose from a long list of proteins, grains, veggies and more) to your topping and dressing. The salads are available in three sizes: petit (RM14.90), medium (RM18.90) and grand (RM23.90); the difference between each is the number of mains and toppings you get to choose – the actual serving size of the dish remains the same, so if you’re content with just four mains, a base and a topping, just go for petit (and use the money you save on Goodness Greens’ other specialities. We'll get to that soon). If you prefer warm meals, order one of the vegan soups (homemade with almond milk instead of cream) available in pumpkin, zucchini, carrot with rosemary and classic mushroom, or get the summer or pesto pasta. For snacks, try not to get too full on GG Dip (spinach and mozzarella dip with baguette slices), and for a light but nutritious breakfast, the açaí berry and dragon fruit smoothie bowls

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Restaurants

Kult Coffee

This indie coffee joint serves your usual espresso-based coffees as well as cold brews in rustic vintage bottles. It may not seem the part, but Kult Coffee also serves waffles with ice cream, fry-ups, poached eggs, pasta dishes, and even nasi lemak – all of which, according to its Facebook page, are made from scratch. Its close proximity to record store Teenage Head Records means that you can swing by for a bite after some serious vinyl shopping.

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Restaurants

2OX

From the team behind Maison Française comes French bistro and bar 2OX. Headed by Chef Thierry Le Baut, the restaurant on the Doraisamy stretch goes for a casual Parisian vibe with its elegant setting (white-tiled walls, leather and wood furnishings, a fine wine list) and classic French fare (duck rillette, toasted goat’s cheese, coq au vin). Go for the three-course sets that start from RM88++.

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Restaurants

Yellow Apron

The team behind Section 17's The Humble Pie Co. have made a notable expansion in the form of Yellow Apron not too far away in PJ's Section 13, breathing some life into the office- and warehouse-dominated street behind Jaya One. On the inside, Yellow Apron fulfils the criteria of today's sought-after cafés (a clean, minimalist interior with plenty of natural light coming in). It's also very spacious, making it a suitable spot for families with young children.  Currently, the menu at Yellow Apron features burgers, sandwiches, pastas and even some rice and noodle dishes, with plans of introducing a dinner menu of Malaysian-style tapas (or 'mapas' as they're calling it) soon. In the meantime, standouts include 'The Big Bold Beef Cheese Wasabi Sandwich' (like a roast beef sandwich but with wasabi in a pretzel bun), 'Curry Lamb Bam, Thank You Mam' (lamb shoulder curry with basmati rice), 'The Fantastically Fusion Fried Chicken Burger' (boneless buttermilk chicken thigh with sambal belacan), and 'Dancing Prawns, Swimming Chicken Fried Yee Mee Noodles'. At this point, you should know that Yellow Apron likes long, funny names.  Other than black coffee by Papa Pahleta and a selection of teas, Yellow Apron also serves sangria and bottled beers as well as a range of mocktails. For dessert, there are (obviously) pies and cakes by The Humble Pie Co, including its famed banoffee pie and Musang King pie.

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Latest interviews

Film

Leonardo DiCaprio

'Hi, I’m Leo.’ In a hotel room in London, Leonardo DiCaprio walks over from the window where he’s been puffing on an electronic cigarette. He’s smiling. A good sign. The actor is famously private and once walked out on a journalist who was rude to him. At 41, he is no longer the impossibly beautiful boy he was in ‘Romeo + Juliet’ and ‘Titanic’. I’m more dazzled by his knitwear than his looks – he’s wearing a navy blue cashmere jumper so expensive and soft that I have to resist the temptation to stroke his arm. DiCaprio is a man with a lot to smile about. 2016 belongs to him. After being nominated four times for an Oscar, there’s a very strong chance he will walk up the aisle in February to pick up the Best Actor award for ‘The Revenant’. The film is set in 1823, and he plays real-life frontiersman Hugh Glass, left for dead in the Rocky Mountains by his hunting party. Directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu (‘Birdman’), it’s a brutal, raw revenge drama that puts Glass through the wringer: attacked by a bear; mauled by Tom Hardy (who, let’s face it, is scarier than a grizzly); buried alive; so cold he sleeps in the still-steaming carcass of a horse. Yes, it’s acting – but DiCaprio also lived it. The nine-month shoot in Canada and Argentina was so tough that some of the crew have described it as ‘a living hell’. Everyone talks about how down-to-earth DiCaprio is. I’m not sure that’s true. How down-to- earth can you be when you’ve been one of the world’s most famous actors sinc

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Film

John Boyega

Right now, John Boyega might be the happiest guy in the universe. He’s 23, he was hand-picked by director JJ Abrams to appear in ‘Star Wars – The Force Awakens’, set to be the biggest movie of the decade, and now everyone on Earth wants a piece of him. Dressed to the nines in designer clobber and slumped in a chair in one of London’s swankiest hotels, the young Brit grips my hand and grins like a lottery winner. ‘You know when you sit down with an actor and you ask how they are and they say they’re good?’ he bellows. ‘I’m genuinely good!’ Boyega’s casting in ‘Star Wars’ as Finn – a character rumoured to be a foot soldier who deserts his Stormtrooper platoon to join the rebel resistance – came as a surprise to almost everyone when it was announced last year. It was followed by a slew of comment pieces, many of them portraying him as a kid from the mean streets, cut from the same guns ’n’ gangs cloth as his character Moses in the 2011 British alien invasion flick ‘Attack the Block’. All of which is, of course, complete nonsense: Boyega is just a damn fine actor, fierce and charming in the proud British tradition of Albert Finney, Bob Hoskins and Tom Hardy. But there’s an openness to him too, especially in person: a hyperactive enthusiasm and skyrocketing self-confidence that’s impossible not to warm to. It’s a unique combination, and it makes Boyega the perfect fit for the gritty-but-giddy fairytale world of ‘Star Wars’. The fact that he’s a lightsaber-swinging, action-figure

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Film

Daniel Craig

If you want to know how James Bond – sorry, I mean Daniel Craig – starts the day, I can tell you. Two double espressos with honey. Plus poached eggs on toast. With another double espresso to follow. So basically: caffeine, more caffeine and some more caffeine, with honey to soften the blow. And some eggs. It’s the British actor’s fourth outing as Bond, and his second with the director Sam Mendes after the huge success of ‘Skyfall’ – which in 2012 took over USD1,000 million at the global box office. So, no pressure, then. Another double espresso, please… When we speak, Craig is tired and he’s wired. He turns up in jeans, T-shirt, leather jacket and a New York Yankees cap at the photo studio where he’s being shot for Time Out. His arms betray the intense fitness training that goes into playing 007. At one point during our hour together he jokes: ‘Am I getting my kit off in this movie? Yes, I’ve been working out for six months. Of course I’m getting my kit off!’ He’s exhausted but he’s also on a high from two years of intensive work – first getting the story right in close collaboration with Mendes and the film’s writers and producers. Then came the shoot, hopping back and forth between Pinewood Studios near London and Mexico City, Morocco, the Austrian Alps and Rome. He thinks – thinks – ‘Spectre’ is going to be a good, stylish, classic Bond movie, and Craig is not an actor who talks bullshit. He’s blunt. He’s thoughtful. He’s wary of being precious. But he’s obviously nervo

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Music

Leo Ari

Leo Ari is an artist, according to Leo Ari. ‘I’m an artist. Leo Ari is an artistic concept, not a musical concept; it’s an artistic concept as a whole, which will constantly change, constantly evolve,’ says the 24-year-old musician and visual artist, whose real name is Adli Nazrin. If you haven’t heard of Leo Ari, it’s because: a) you’re not a Generation Y, Z or a millennial; b) you’re not on the internet, but more specifically, you’re not on Reddit, Tumblr or YouTube, the rabbit holes of cat videos, glitch art and post-internet poetry; and c) as scene as it is to like Leo Ari, he’s after all relatively new to the scene. It’s only been a year since he debuted with ‘Silap’, but it’s fair to say he’s at the forefront of a new subculture: one that crosses over from digital to reality and back again to digital, nostalgic for early internet and late ’90s/early millennia pop culture, appropriating cybergoth, punk and rave elements. His debut EP – a six-track offering titled ‘Love Must Be Real’ – is potent; here is a person that not only believes that the bare fact of love is fleeting and futile, but also manages to convey that confusion into sound, streamlining the complications of love into simple forms: limber, liquid chillwave electronics, earnest and enthusiastic, with emotional and sonic touchstones of familiarity. ‘Love must be real, because it fucking hurts’ is printed on the back cover of the EP; it’s trite, but it’s true. ‘Love Must Be Real’ isn’t exactly nostalgic for t

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The best of Kuala Lumpur

Restaurants

Top 40 restaurants and cafés

The Time Out KL Food 40: Our monthly guide to the best places to eat in town, reviewed anonymously by critics.

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Things to do

The best tourist attractions in KL

Whether you're a first-time visitor looking for things to do (without resorting to too many clichés), or a local who just wants to play tourist for a day, here are ten ways to earn your tourist badge in KL.

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Restaurants

The 15 best dishes in KL

This year, we look at the top entries that speak to our larger KL culinary scene, inspire our midnight cravings, and demonstrate real respect for flavour. Here are the dishes that best stood out in 2015.

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Restaurants

The best coffee shops in KL

KL's coffee culture is an expanding landscape of imported beans, state-of-the-art machines, hip baristas, and silky smooth pours. Here are the best coffee shops in KL that call the shots.

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Restaurants

Time Out KL Food Awards winners

Every year, we ask you to put forward your nominations for the best cafés and restaurants that deserve the highest recognition in the Kuala Lumpur dining scene. You’ve voted, and here are the award results.

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Restaurants

Best cafés in KL

You’ve got to admit that a trip to a good café sets you in a cheery mood – the sun-soaked space, glorious sunny side ups and that tingling dose of caffeine. The Time Out KL team maps out the best cafés for every occasion, from Instagram eye candies to the brunch of champions.

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