The Tempest

Theater

Shakespeare

Edgewater

Until Sun Mar 16

  • $
  • Photograph: Cole Simon

    Callie Johnson and Dave Skvarla in The Tempest at City Lit Theater

  • Photograph: Cole Simon

    Callie Johnson and Dave Skvarla in The Tempest at City Lit Theater

Photograph: Cole Simon

Callie Johnson and Dave Skvarla in The Tempest at City Lit Theater

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>1</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>2</span>/5
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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5
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Michael Antman

I don't think this review, or the reviewer, need any defending, but this piece is right on. City Lit's production is earnest, respectful, and painfully mediocre. It just doesn't appear as if the director had any fresh ideas or was willing to take any discernible attitude toward the play other than to present it in the most neutral manner possible -- no illumination, no poetry, no magic. This wasn't by any means the worst Shakespeare production I've ever seen, but it was the most forgettable.

Alice222

I saw this play last weekend and thoroughly enjoyed it (my 5 star review is for the play). I completely disagree with this reviewer and was stunned by his negativity. I've never seen the Tempest before and am glad that I was able to see it in its true form. It would have been very annoying if this play had been subjected to a "recontexualization" or changed substantially to dumb it down for those who do not appreciate Shakespeare's beautiful plays.

SpunkyMonkey

Wow, it's easy to write a negative review when your name isn't attached to it, isn't it? If the reviewer hates The Tempest so much ("an insufferable slog to begin with") perhaps he/she shouldn't review it? My one-star rating is for the original review, not the production itself.

RangerJazz

The bizarre prejudices and obscurantist dogma coloring this piece, evident from the first paragraph, effectively excuse its author from making any sort of meaningful determination as to the actual merits of this production. Assigning a critic with not only a severe distaste for the material, but a complete aversion to the entire aesthetic approach taken by the ensemble is comparable to a pasta-hating restaurant critic reviewing an Italian restaurant. It is not only cruelly irresponsible, it suggests a certain vindictiveness on behalf of the publication. The editors of TimeOut should be thoroughly ashamed; the hard-working artistic community of Chicago unequivocally deserves better.