Merlin James

Art , Painting Free
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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'93' (by Merlin James)
1/6
by Merlin James

Courtesy of the artist and Mummery+Schnelle, London; photo: Ruth Clark Photography; © Merlin James

'Buildings' (by Merlin James)
2/6
by Merlin James

Image courtesy of Mummery + Schnelle, London; © Merlin James

'Effet de Lune' (by Merlin James)
3/6
by Merlin James

Courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co, New York; © Merlin James

'Large Sea' (by Merlin James)
4/6
by Merlin James

Image courtesy of Mummery+Schnelle, London; © Merlin James

'Piper' (by Merlin James)
5/6
by Merlin James

Courtesy of Mummery + Schnelle, London; © Merlin James

'Signal Box'
6/6

Courtesy of the artist, Mummery+Schnelle, London, and Sikkema Jenkins & Co, New York; © Merlin James

It’s hard for painting to escape its own past, so trying to do something new with the medium is a pretty tall order. Merlin James doesn’t bother. Instead, over the course of a 30-year career, the Welsh painter has created a body of work which constantly refers to and reimagines painting and its history.

The result here is a mini survey that’s a field day for art nerds. You can spot the semi-abstract formality of Nicolas de Staël, turbulent Turner-esque seascapes, post-impressionist hill views and Kandinsky-like colour compositions. There is Van Gogh’s sower, rendered in rough blobs of blue and yellow. There are Chagall’s trees, hazy and contorted.

James comes across like a sampler, chopping and screwing his sources for new purposes. But it’s a challenge to make sense of a room that puts modernist abstraction next to surrealist composition and naive, although admittedly charming, landscape painting. Some of it has a raw beauty.

There’s a quiet aesthetic determination and a strong compositional eye in works such as ‘Toll House’ (1983) and the almost sculpturally layered ‘Chalet and Other Building’ (2009). But, as a whole, the show is more difficult and confusing than it should be. What saves it is the sense of James on a deeply personal exploration of something he truly loves. The paintings are studies of not only art, but possibly of the artist himself. It makes for a compelling, though gentle, glimpse into his mind.

Eddy Frankel

Event phone: 020 7490 7373
Event website: http://www.parasol-unit.org
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