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The Time Out London blog

Your up-to-the-minute guide to London life, news, culture, pop-ups, and openings

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21 signs you grew up in south London

Face it: if you grew up in 'Sarrf', you'll never be able to shake off those roots. Here are 21 signs you hail from south of the river.  1. The words 'innit', 'fab', 'babe', 'hoodrat', 'wasteman/woman', 'boss', 'bruv', 'blaad', 'nasty' and 'is it' are all common in your vocabulary. 2. You don’t care what anyone says, Morley’s is the best chicken shop in the whole entire world.    Posh chicken in a bucket. 🐔🐣🐓🍗🍗🍗 Nothing beats morleys back in London though... Cheap, cheerful & munch lol! 😋 pic.twitter.com/ntMoeZtX9q — char (@ItssChar_) 9 April 2016     3. You get extremely irate when another Londoner says you don’t actually live in London because there’s not a single useful tube line there. 4. You are the king or queen of giving maximum shade.  via GIPHY 5. Waiting for the 322 or 417 bus to come by in any direction fills you with absolute horror. 6. The sound of an early morning police siren was your alarm clock. 7. You have childhood memories of discovering all the dinosaurs in Crystal Palace Park. Frankie Roberto via flickr 8. You avoided, and still continue to avoid Penge at all costs. 9. Another school trip to the Horniman Museum was your idea of extreme boredom.  via GIPHY 10. You are used to black cab discrimination in the West End as so many taxi drivers still won't drive south of the river. 11. The first time you visited Dulwich all you could remember saying was: 'innit posh' to all your friends.   A photo posted by Fran

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Five glorious waterside pubs you should visit on a sunny day

The sun’s out! We’ve picked the best riverside pubs where you can pick up sunny pints and top-notch food. The Ship, Wandsworth Not only does The Ship in Wandsworth sit right on the river, it’s got one of the most epic pub gardens we’ve seen in London, which accommodates hundreds of people and has bookable private booths. Here, you can feast on the ethically and sustainably sourced seasonal British menu, or have a quick bite from pop-up residents Burger Shack. Oh, and some of their beer is brewed on-site, too. City Barge, Chiswick Further upstream in Chiswick is the City Barge. It's also right on the Thames and has a herb garden with lots more seating adjacent to the pub. There are tables in front of the pub on the towpath, but they do flood at high tide so prepare to move a little further back if it hits. Foodie favourites here include the soft-shell 'crabocado' burger with miso mayo, and pork cooked three ways. White Hart, Barnes For the perfect spot to watch the rowers go by, head to the White Hart in Barnes, where you can sit on the terrace outside the bar, or at the upstairs terrace for food, both of which overlook the Thames. It’s a peaceful part of the river but the pub’s lively enough. And when the sun comes out so does the barbecue, so make sure you order the swordfish to go with your pint. Canal 125, King's Cross If the Thames is all a bit much then check out Canal 125 on Regent’s Canal. It’s calmer than the river but just as beautiful in the

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In pictures: the London Transport Museum Depot in Acton

As most Londoners know, the London Transport Museum’s pretty fab. Buffed-up engines, tube simulators, the capital’s geekiest bookshop. What’s not to love? But trains and buses need space – lots of it, and there’s only so much that be squeezed into the former Covent Garden market hall. So that’s why the museum has an extra storage facility in Acton, a vast warehouse stuffed with 370,000 more goodies. It's the sort of place Willy Wonka would’ve conjured up had public transport been his thing. Here’s a peek at some of the items I discovered on one of the depot’s rare open days. Robert Lordan Omnibus Horse-drawn omnibuses were the Routemasters of their day. Each route was colour coded – pretty vital in the days when many folk were illiterate and a system which lives on in today’s tube map. This particular wagon first hit the cobbles in 1885 and trotted the yellow line from Baker Street to Waterloo until 1911.  Robert Lordan Wooden Metropolitan line carriage They may not have boasted bright lights and air-con but the early wooden carriages on the nineteenth century Metropolitan line were still pretty classy – where would you see a logo of this calibre nowadays?  Robert Lordan Freight on the Met For many years the Met carried freight as well as commuters. Here’s a glimpse into an old goods wagon complete with churns that would’ve ferried fresh milk straight into the metropolis.  Robert Lordan Tram Standing beside an old-school tram gives you a sense of

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Four places in London for excellent onion rings

  Few things go better with a pint or a burger than a portion of well-made onion rings. In fact, some are so good you could dine on them alone. Here's where to find the perfect ringers.  The Ring, Southwark This pub got its name because it serves up the best onion rings in London. (No, I refuse to believe it had anything to do with the now-defunct boxing ring over the road.) Here you’ll find moist, buttery onions in a fluffy outer shell. The kicker? They’re laced with chilli. Meat Liquor, various sites It has come to be known in certain culinary circles that the onion rings at Meat Liquor are quite simply as big as your face. What more really needs to be said? © Dirty Burger Dirty Burger, various sites What do you get when you cross the two best accompaniments to a burger? Answer: onion fries. That’s right, Dirty Burger’s onions are in no way circular, but guess what? It doesn’t matter. These beauties are salty, sodden with oil, and surrounded by a paper-thin batter – in other words, everything you want in an onion ring. You know, without the 'ring' bit. The Mayflower, Rotherhithe As you surely already know, this pub’s named after the ship that transported the first pilgrims to America in 1620, departing from the adjacent dock on the Thames. Unfortunately for them, these pilgrims clearly didn’t taste the pub’s bar snacks – the allure of the al dente onions encased in a batter with the crunchiness not unlike Monster Munch would’ve ensured they never bothered to s

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Video: here's how they make rainbow bagels

The rainbow bagel is here and it's taking over Instagram. Originally created at The Bagel Store in Brooklyn, it was only a matter of time before someone in London started making them.   Rob Greig       The first place to bust out the food colouring was The Beigel Shop (the yellow one on Brick Lane), so we went behind the scenes to find out how they make the Play Doh-style boiled beauties and if they actually taste any good. Here's the technicolour baking process – watch to the end to find out whether they actually do taste like a rainbow.    

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Trendy fried chicken vs cheapo: Which is better? (And other foodstuffs)

Thanks to the gentrification of humble takeaway fare in London, there are kebab restaurants run by ex-Le Gavroche chefs and chippies that do fizz with your fish. But is gourmet junk food actually better than the cheap and cheerful originals? There’s only one way to find out… Fish and chips Cheap: Haddock and chips, The Fryer’s Delight, Holborn. £7.95 This old-school chippy has been on the scene since 1968, so it’s had plenty of time to hone its craft: crispy batter, light and flaky fish, crunchy chips with fluffy insides – and not too much guilt-inducing grease on the plate afterwards. An oldie and a goodie. Posh: Haddock and chips, Vintage Salt, Islington. £12 As with The Fryer’s Delight, you get perfectly executed fish and chips here, but it comes with a heftier price tag. What you’re really paying for is the experience. This place is nice: brasserie feel, stonkingly good cocktail list (pickle-juice martini, anyone?) and proper fabric napkins. Now that is posh. VERDICT: It’s a draw. The fish and chips aren’t an awful lot nicer at the posh place, but it gets bonus points for the trimmings. Fried chicken Cheap: Spicy ‘M’ wings, Morley’s, Camberwell. £2.30 for eight wings   As every connoisseur of post-pub munchies knows, it isn’t Red Bull that gives you wings, it’s five pints of strong IPA followed by a stagger through the delicious meaty aroma of your local chicken shop. The batter at Morley’s sings with spice, the wings are deliciously greasy, and they cost

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Four places in London for the totally tea-obsessed

Can't get enough of a good cuppa? Head to one of these lovely spots to get your tea fix. The pub Stoke Newington Tea House    A photo posted by Anne (em) Cortez (@mariemontclair) on Jan 7, 2016 at 2:25pm PST Describing itself as ‘a British pub with some twists’, this newly opened drinking spot – formerly The Daniel Defoe – allows you to sip on the leafy stuff in the setting of a traditional boozer. More than 100 types of loose leaf tea are available, as well as a range of cocktails, beer and wine. 102 Stoke Newington Church St, N16 0LA. Stoke Newington rail. The café Tiosk   A photo posted by Irene Michaelides (@ireney10) on Mar 5, 2016 at 7:34am PST There are many minimalist cafés in east London but few that have shunned coffee in favour of London’s original caffeinated drink. Broadway Market’s Tiosk has more teas than you can shake a stirrer at, along with a sumptuous-looking selection of salads, stews and wholesome soups. 33 Broadway Market, E8 4PH. Cambridge Heath rail. The bar Jarr Kombucha   A photo posted by @jarrkombucha on Nov 27, 2015 at 9:10am PST In case you’re not au fait with this Californian health craze, kombucha is a bitter-tasting fermented tea drink packed with supposedly beneficial microbes. Hackney Wick’s Jarr Kombucha bar is dedicated to the ‘live’ stuff and even does a fine line in kombucha cocktails. So you can be healthy while being, er... unhealthy. Mick’s Garage, Queen’s Yard, E9 5EN. Hackney Wick Overgr

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In pictures: behind the scenes at London's theatres

Photographer Matt Humphrey has spent the last year living a theatre buff's dream, hanging out backstage at over 50 productions including 'Hamlet' at the Barbican Theatre, 'American Buffalo' at Wyndham’s Theatre and 'As You Like It' at the Globe. He's taken a whopping 18,000 behind the scenes photographs, including snaps of Damian Lewis, Benedict Cumberbatch and Dame Helen Mirren getting ready to go on stage as her Maj in 'The Audience' – and you can now see the best of them in his new book, 'A Year Backstage In London Theatre'.  The book is out on March 28 but we've got a sneak peek of the backstage snaps: Matt Humphrey       Matt Humphrey   Matt Humphrey   Matt Humphrey   Matt Humphrey   Matt Humphrey   Matt Humphrey Matt Humphrey     'A Year Backstage In London Theatre' is £45 and available for pre-order here. Check out the top ten theatre openings in London this March.

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Five maps that quantify exactly how rammed London is

London – it's quite busy, isn't it? But maybe more than you even realise. As of this time last year, 8.6 million people call Greater London their home. That makes London a LOT bigger than other UK cities. You could fit people from all these city districts into London, for example: Admittedly we're cheating a little, because just as 'London' is much bigger than just the central district, so 'Greater Manchester' is much bigger than just the middle bit of Manchester. But even if you take entire metropolitan counties, you can still fit everyone from five of the country's biggest into Greater London: See? There's loads of us. Who else could you fit in London? Yep, there are more Londoners than Scottish (5.3 million) and Welsh people (3.0 million) put together. How about some American cities? You could fit the citizens from these all places comfortably inside the Big Smoke:  In fact, we're even bigger than all these countries combined: Come to think of it, London is also more populous than Israel, Switzerland, Denmark, Finland, Norway, New Zealand and Jamaica... to name but a few. (If we became our own country, we'd be the 96th largest – just a few thousand people smaller than Austria.) If this is all making your blood pressure rise, just be glad you don't live in Shanghai, which at 24 million people (nearly three times the size of London) is the largest city in the world:  Finally, a snappy demographic fact to impress someone on a first date: if you drained

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Where is the best Nando's in London?

  London is filled with amazing independent cafés, Michelin-starred restaurants and quirky street food pop-ups, but you know what? Sometimes you don't want any of that. Sometimes you just want a Nando's (cheeky or otherwise). And because it's a chain, it doesn't matter which one you go to – they're all the same, right? Wrong. The folks at The Mirror have taken it upon themselves to find out once and for all which are the best and worst Nando's restaurants in the country. They looked at every Nando's UK branch that had more than 20 reviews on Trip Advisor – and apparently it's something people feel pretty strongly about, as there were 308 branches that made the cut. Each branch was ranked by its average star rating and then by the total number of reviews submitted. If you're really committed to getting the best Nando's experience, you better hop on a train to the north-east as the most-loved branch is in a town called Boldon, just south of Newcastle. But the good news is that four of the top ten best Nando's are in London. Next time you want to get your poultry and peri peri fix, head to the King's Cross branch, which came third in the country. Or failing that, branches in Earl's Court, Victoria Wilton Road and Covent Garden all made the top ten, too. Prefer your chicken fried? We lift the lid on London's obsession with fried chicken. Or find out which fared better in our taste test of trendy fried chicken vs cheapo.

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Quit your job, become a... yoga instructor

© Rob Greig   Olga Allon, 39, director and head teacher at Hot Yoga Society Why did you decide to pursue hot yoga instead of normal cold yoga? ‘I fell in love with it. Ten years ago there weren’t many hot yoga studios around and I felt huge benefits from doing it, so I thought it was the right decision. But I’m also a qualified architect.’ Whoa. Was it a tough transition from architecture to yoga? ‘It was incredibly hard to move away from the security of a nine-to-five job and a salary, but it was becoming increasingly frustrating being in an office environment. I also knew that at some point I wanted to have a family. The unknown was definitely daunting, but it was exciting at the same time because I knew I wanted to have that freedom to choose how I spent my days.’ What's an average day like now that you're the boss? ‘The day normally starts about 6.30am with mindful meditation, then it’s straight to the yoga studio, taking classes, teaching, meeting people to develop the business, spending time with my staff and teachers, and trialling new classes.’ Do you have to maintain a healthy lifestyle for this job? ‘Absolutely. If I’m going to preach about that lifestyle and have a studio that’s effectively all about health and wellbeing, I need to live it myself.’ Are there ever any awkward lol moments in your class? ‘We have a posture called “wind- removing pose” and it does what exactly it says on the package. It’s supposed to clear out your intestines, so you tend

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25 photos that prove London is just a cute little village

It's a popular misconception that London is a bustling global metropolis with a population of over 8 million. But in fact, it's simply a twee-as-fuck village consisting purely of cobbled streets and charming attractions. These photos prove our point. 1) All the museums are tiny:   A photo posted by @anya_alaska on Jan 17, 2016 at 10:15am PST 2) The streets are all small:   A photo posted by Erica Siegel (@ericasiegel) on Jan 12, 2016 at 2:36am PST 3) The village garden is well turned out: Patrizia Ilaria Sechi" data-width-class="" /> © Patrizia Ilaria Sechi  4) And the local pub is ridiculously pretty:   A photo posted by {رو لولو} ȓŭė ℒʊℒʊ (@ruelulu) on Jul 30, 2015 at 12:50am PDT 5) There are pretty little cottages: Patrizia Ilaria Sechi" data-width-class="" /> © Patrizia Ilaria Sechi 6) Winding roads everywhere:   A photo posted by @jamesleach on Jan 10, 2016 at 9:14am PST 7) A sweet local greengrocer:    A photo posted by @t3j1 on Dec 8, 2015 at 12:06pm PST 8)  Wide open spaces are never far away: Mark, Flickr" data-width-class="" /> © Mark, Flickr  9) There are colourful facades:   A photo posted by JAMES HENRY / (@getjimbo) on Oct 1, 2015 at 10:08am PDT 10) Street stalls:   A photo posted by #prettycitylondon (@prettycitylondon) on Oct 17, 2015 at 1:24am PDT 11) The two main modes of transport are VINTAGE CAR:   A photo posted by K S E N I A (@kseniaskos) on Jan 24, 2016

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