Chichester Cinema At New Park

Venue name: Chichester Cinema At New Park
Contact:
Address: New Park Centre
New Park Road
Chichester
PO19 7XY
Transport: BR: Chichester
  • Altman's unexpected venture into Agatha Christie territory works a treat. The setting is an English country house, the year 1932, and the many and varied heirs to the McCordle family inheritance congregate for the weekend to bag pheasants, ruffle ...
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  • Time Out says
    • 4 out of 5 stars
    While other filmmakers get their hands dirty in kitchen sinks, Wes Anderson surely slips his into luxury cashmere mittens. His films overflow with intricate detail and make no pretence of existing in a world other than their own, just-about-earthb...
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  • Time Out says
    • 4 out of 5 stars
    This sequel to his 1987 film ‘Hope and Glory’ is the best thing that John Boorman has directed since. It begins where the first film left off, continuing his autobiographical account of WWII and its aftermath. When we last saw Bill Rowan, the Lond...
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  • Time Out says
    • 4 out of 5 stars
    The title makes you think of Richard Linklater’s ‘Boyhood’ – but that takes away from the specialness of this French coming-of-age-drama which is powerfully attuned to race, solidarity and the dead ends that many kids have to be smart enough to av...
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  • Time Out says
    • 5 out of 5 stars
    Joshua Oppenheimer's 2012 documentary 'The Act of Killing' was a radical, disquieting thing: a bizarre forum for Indonesia's genocidal leaders (still feared nearly 50 years after their anti-Communist purge) to recreate their murders as fantasy ski...
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  • Time Out says
    • 3 out of 5 stars
    When his mum goes off to find work, ten-year-old Eric is shipped off to stay with his handyman dad in a grimy Bogota boarding house. One of dad’s clients, a well-meaning university lecturer, offers to let father and son stay with her family at the...
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  •  If you’re planning on taking a gamble this festival, you could do a lot worse than catching Dagur Kári’s follow-up to ‘Noi Albinoi’, a drifting and delightfully funny shaggy-dog story of graffiti artist Daniel (Cedergren) and his utter detachment...
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