Artist Textiles: Picasso to Warhol

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One of the group of four screen-printed rayon headsquares designed by Marcel Vertes for Wesley Simpson Custom Fabrics Inc., circa 1944.

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Henri Matisse’s first design for Ascher, ‘Echarpe No. 1’, was exhibited at the Lefevre Gallery, 1947. One of the two coral-based designs, it was intended to be produced in a limited edition of 275.

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‘Sun God’ by Pádraig Macmiadhacháin for David Whitehead’s ‘Living Art’ collection, 1969.

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Steve Tanner

Number, Please?’ a silk scarf designed by Dali for Wesley Simpson circa 1947. The design is derived from a sequence in Dali’s animation for Disney of 1946, Destino.

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‘Ballerina’, a screen-printed silk scarf designed by Salvador Dali for Wesley Simpson circa 1947.

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Steve Tanner

‘Spring Rain’ a furnishing textile from Schiffer Prints’ second ‘Stimulus’ collection, 1949. Dali’s surrealist designs of the 1940s had a wide influence on textile design in the USA for the next ten years.

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‘Manhattan’, a block-printed cotton, furnishing textile, designed by Ruth Reeves and produced by W & J Sloane. This design was exhibited at the International Exhibition of Metalwork & Cotton Textiles, 1930, under the title ‘Canyons of Steel.’

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Dress designed by John Tullis for Horrockses Fashions, made from a textile designed by Eduardo Paolozzi. The Artwork for this textile was one of two by Paolozzi exhibited at ‘Painting into Textiles’, 1953. Highly publicized at the time, this stunning design was produced in at least two colourways.

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Printed cotton dress by Horrockses Fashions, made from a textile designed by Graham Sutherland, circa 1949, and featured in both Tatler and The Queen. Sutherland’s work with textiles was extensive, from carpets in the 1940s through to scarf designs for Hardy Amies in the 1960s.

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Lucian Freud’s winning design for furnishing fabric, shown at the East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing and published in Art & Industry, October 1942.

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Steve Tanner

‘Circus’, the first textile design by John Rombola to be produced by Patterson Fabrics, 1956. Rombola’s designs were also produced as wallpapers by Patterson’s sister companies, Piazza Prints and Harben Papers.

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Steve Tanner

‘White Trellis’, an artist’s square designed by Graham Sutherland for Ascher Ltd, 1946. Screen –printed rayon. A version of this scarf and a companion design were exhibited by Ascher at ‘Britain Can Make It’, 1946, alongside Henry Moore’s ‘Standing Figures’ and yardage by Gerald Wilde.

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One of the group of four screen-printed rayon headsquares designed by Marcel Vertes for Wesley Simpson Custom Fabrics Inc., circa 1944.

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One of the group of four screen-printed rayon headsquares designed by Marcel Vertes for Wesley Simpson Custom Fabrics Inc., circa 1944.

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Steve Tanner

‘Endless – Where?’ a printed rayon tie designed by Salvador Dali, late 1940s. Dali created numerous tie designs throughout the 1940s for a number of companies.

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Parade’, by Rombola for Patterson Fabrics, 1957, was also printed as a wallpaper by Piazza Prints.

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Screen-printed velvet furnishing textile, designed by Duncan Grant and intended for use on the P & O liner ‘Queen Mary’, produced by Allan Walton 1936.

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Steve Tanner

Ben Nicholson’s ‘Princess,’ hand block-printed cotton, designed circa 1933.

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‘Family Group’, an artist’s square designed by Henry Moore for Ascher, was exhibited both at ‘Britain Can Make It’, 1946, and the Lefevre Gallery, 1947, as well as being used for the cover of Grace Lovat Fraser’s book, Textiles by Britain, 1948. The original sketches for the square date from circa 1944.

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‘Chiesa De La Salute’, one of the Sanderson centenary textiles designed by Piper in 1959, and issued in 1960.

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A silk square, designed by Sonia Delaunay, and produced in a limited edition by Liberty of London, 1969.

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‘Fall’, designed by Cliff Holden for Heal Fabrics, 1960. Holden, Grönwall and Nilsson, were known collectively as the ‘Marstrand Designers’.

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Steve Tanner

Detail of ‘Flower Ballet’ a textile designed by Salvador Dali, circa 1947, printed by Wesley Simpson on their ‘Pebble Crêpe’ rayon, giving this design a further surreal aspect.

Picasso's lesser known artistic output centred on textiles, and the Fashion and Textile Museum introduces more than 18 little-known textiles and garments made by the surrealist artist. Pieces on display include a 1955 dress in a ‘fish’ design, a PVC ski jacket in his characteristic ‘toros’ motif and a 1963 pair of hostess cocktail culottes in printed corduroy, called ‘Musical Faun.’ There are also pieces by Raoul Dufy, Salvador Dali, Henri Matisse, Joan Miró and Andy Warhol amongst others.  Due to the popularity of the exhibition the museum will be now opening on Thursday evenings and Sundays, kicking off with a series of related Sunday free talks and workshops starting April 6th and going on until May 11th. The first 25 visitors to the Museum on Sunday 6 April will receive a free limited-edition screen print from the Zandra Rhodes textile studio at the Museum. The first 25 visitors on Sunday 13 April will receive a free tea or coffee at the Museum café. Check out the details below for more details on the programme.

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