Movies

Find Los Angeles movie showtimes, read movie reviews, find theaters in your neighborhood and buy movie tickets here. Plus, browse the top film events in LA.

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Review: It Follows

The most unexpected and downright unnerving fright flick in years.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Film events this week: critics' picks

Whether you prefer drive-ins, director Q&As or outdoor screenings, we've got you covered.

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Review: Man From Reno

Dave Boyle, a white Mormon from Arizona and former missionary, has been the most unlikely voice in the Asian-American filmmaking community.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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The 100 best animated movies

We know you’ll find something to love in our authoritative ranking of the best animated movies ever made

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Best movie theaters in LA

Here are our picks for the 11 best movie theaters LA has to offer. Do you agree wholeheartedly?

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The best upcoming movie releases

Movies in theaters: Critics' picks

Movies

While We're Young

Maturity is a slippery staircase in the comedies of Noah Baumbach (The Squid and the Whale, Frances Ha). He delights in puffing up then deflating characters who aren’t quite ready to grow up. While We’re Young, the writer-director’s confidently charming latest, plays more like a Woody Allen–ish parody than any of his other movies, but the shift hasn’t required a sacrifice in insight, heart or bite. Josh and Cornelia (Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts, both terrific) are Gen Xers 
in a marriage cooled by stalling ambitions and a failure to join their friends’ baby parade. It’s sexless nights on the iPad until the unexpected affections of a much younger couple, Jamie and Darby (Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried), energize their lives. Suddenly there are postironic hats to buy, hip-hop dance classes to flail around in and multiple trips to Bushwick. Baumbach could have rocked this register and made a perfectly fun New Yorker piece out of the premise (Josh and Cornelia marvel at the twentysomethings’ loft, complete with a pants-free female roommate, a caged chicken and “everything we once threw out”). But where he ends up going—a place of real anxiety and envy—speaks to the filmmaker’s nervy ambitions. If this is Baumbach’s commercial breakthrough, he will have made it several steps up that staircase with nothing lost. Follow Joshua Rothkopf on Twitter: @joshrothkopf

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

White God

According to Hollywood legend, the Oscars banned animals from being eligible for Best Actor after German shepherd Rin Tin Tin won the most votes in 1929. That won’t sound so ridiculous when you watch this powerful Hungarian drama featuring the Al Pacino of dog actors, real-life mutt twins Body and Luke. They share the role of Hagen, the four-legged best friend of 13-year-old tomboy Lili (Zsófia Psotta), who’s shipped off to spend the summer with her dad in Budapest. No fan of dogs, he dumps poor Hagen on a busy road rather than pay a tax. A couple of Lassie-style adventures later, Hagen falls into the clutches of a ferrety dog fighter who turns the big softie into a killing machine—animal lovers, cover your eyes—by viciously beating him and filing his teeth into sharp points. But Hagen bites back, leading an attack, alongside a pack of feral strays, on his human oppressors.  If it wasn’t so violent, the simplicity of the film’s metaphor—how the abused and outcast will rise up—would make it suitable for young audiences. And you won’t beat White God for dog acting: The way director Kornél Mundruczó gets his canine cast to run the gamut of emotions from face-licking adorableness to teeth-baring ferocity is genuinely impressive.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Amour Fou

Berlin, 1811. Heinrich (Christian Friedel) is an author with an exceedingly melancholy disposition. Henriette (Birte Schnoeink) is a woman determined to live out her life in servile deference to her businessman husband (Stephan Grossmann). The writer is smitten at first sight; the lady demurs his affections. When Heinrich later proposes that they die together in a suicide pact, Henriette blanches. But her feelings change after she is diagnosed with a terminal illness.  These events actually happened between the great German writer Heinrich von Kleist—author of The Marquise of O—and his friend Henriette Vogel. Theirs wasn’t a romance informed by physical lust or passion for life, but by an all-consuming obsession with death.  Writer-director Jessica Hausner, whose rigorous, radically feminist films like Hotel (2004) and Lourdes (2009) seem equally derived from Chantal Akerman and Stanley Kubrick, recognizes the comic possibilities of the scenario. It takes some time to get acclimated to Heinrich’s gloomy pronouncements (“Would you like to die with me?” he wonders, as if asking about the weather), as well as to the stiffness of the performers. (When Henriette remarks that she feels like a marionette, it comes off as a knowing acknowledgment.) Even the wallpaper in Henriette’s drawing room seems as if it might come to life and swallow the characters whole. You’re not sure whether to laugh at or recoil from these people and their oppressive surroundings.  That tension actuall

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Man From Reno

For years, Dave Boyle, a white Mormon from Arizona and former missionary, has been the most unlikely voice in the Asian-American filmmaking community. With the arrival of Man From Reno, which finds Boyle graduating from sweet and shambling microbudget indies to a frigid neo-noir that’s told with a master’s touch (and looks like a million bucks), he’s become one of its most essential voices, as well. A rare delight that’s laced with melancholy and a suffocating sense of menace from its first scene straight through its shocking finale, Man From Reno is made special by the collisions between its characters. It begins one black and foggy night as Paul Del Moral (Pepe Serna), the sheriff of a small northern California town, crashes into an already bloodied Japanese pedestrian. The victim vanishes from the hospital the next morning. Meanwhile, across town, a popular detective novelist named Aki (Ayako Fujitani) has ditched the book tour for her latest Inspector Takable installment and flies to San Francisco in an effort to hide from her public. A curiously timid woman for someone so accomplished, Aki lies low in a vintage hotel straight out of Vertigo when a suave stranger (Kazuki Kitamura) from her home country joins her for a nightcap in the lobby bar. They have drinks, have sex and then he disappears. By the time someone tries to murder Aki in her room, you don’t have to be Johnny Gossamer to figure out that the two missing Japanese men are somehow related and that what appears

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Jauja

In Spanish, the word jauja (pronounced “how-ha”) denotes a land of milk and honey, longed for but never reached. Argentine director Lisandro Alonso couldn’t have found a more appropriate name for his magical film about yearning and illusion. On one level, Jauja is literally about people in a quest for territory: Set in no-man’s-Patagonia in the late 19th century, it opens on a group of Argentine officers, accompanied by a Danish engineer (Viggo Mortensen) and his adolescent daughter, as they plot to conquer the region for their country. But when the girl goes missing and her father heads off to find her, the story begins to take on more existential overtones. About a colonialist losing his grip in a threatening, ethereal place, Jauja recalls Werner Herzog’s Aguirre, the Wrath of God. But with no Klaus Kinski to grandstand, this is a subtler, more intimate affair. While Mortensen is excellent as the disoriented European, the film’s great achievement is to create an uneasy claustrophobia in spite of the sweeping landscape. Nobody trusts anyone. And as the coastal hills of the first act give way to the open plains of the deepening plot, we absorbingly retreat into this father’s head. Or is it somebody else’s head? A Lynchian coda upends the entire film, raising several questions and resolving none. Fans of rigorous storytelling may find it to be one whimsical step too far, but others will marvel at this miraculous coup de théâtre. Jauja is a film to make you wonder.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Chappie

After the out-of-nowhere sucker punch of his 2009 debut District 9, Neill Blomkamp’s second film, 2013’s Elysium, felt like the work of a Hollywood-designed, blockbuster-producing robot: slick and anonymous. So it’s a huge relief to discover that, with Chappie, the South African filmmaker has re-engaged his emotion chip and ramped up the weirdness factor for a lovably scattershot cybernetic satire.  We’re in near-future Johannesburg, where a platoon of faceless android crimefighters have begun the mammoth task of cleaning up the streets. But their inventor (Dev Patel) has greater ambitions: He’s working on the world’s first true artificial intelligence, a computer that can not only think, but create.  The result is Chappie, a creature with the body of a killer but the mind of a child. And when Chappie falls into the hands of wannabe gangsters Ninja and Yolandi—played, roughly as themselves, by electroclash duo Die Antwoord—his future is thrown wide open. Will he become a benefit to humanity? Or a menace to society? It would have been easy for Blomkamp to use Chappie as a cipher, a metal shell to be filled with symbolic notions of nature versus nurture, corporate greed and post-human existential angst. But thanks to a wonderful vocal performance from Sharlto Copley, this droid is so much more: He’s adorable, sympathetic and even relatable, a lost soul in a harsh world. Chappie the film isn’t so perfect. The plot is threadbare, the nods to RoboCop are laid on thick and it’s

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movie-going in LA

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Time Out film lists

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The most romantic movies of all time

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From Snow White to Frozen, we explore the brilliant best and woeful worst of Disney animated films.

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50 great documentaries

As long as there is fantasy in film, audiences will also yearn for the truth—or something close to it.

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The top 50 sports films of all time

Ahh, sports movies. Victory, defeat, comebacks and a whole lot of ass slapping.

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