Movies

Find Los Angeles movie showtimes, read movie reviews, find theaters in your neighborhood and buy movie tickets here. Plus, browse the top film events in LA.

Film

The 20 best movies of 2014

All in all, 2014 gave us much to love—and much to argue about. Just as it should be.

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Film

The Interview review

Fashioning The Great Dictator and Inglourious Basterds into a cross joint and then lighting it from both ends.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

Local Christmas film events

Get ready for Christmas with these classic holiday movies screening all over the city.

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Film

Film events this week: critics' picks

Whether you prefer drive-ins, director Q&As or outdoor screenings, we've got you covered.

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Film

The 50 best Christmas movies

It’s the most wonderful time of the year—but is it the most wonderful time at the movies?

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Movies in theaters: Critics' picks

Film

Red Army

The Soviet Union produced magnificent hockey players, even as its citizens starved and the Cold War wobbled toward a welcome if uncertain fizzle-out. Gabe Polsky’s Red Army does an energizing, often hilarious job of foregrounding the symbolism of these clean-cut men, shining examples of a superiority that, on the ice, was no mere bluff. Via bizarre footage and masculine choral music, we watch youngsters tumbling through arduous regimes, learning from a poetic and inspired coach (the legendary Anatoli Tarasov) and participating in the mythic showdown at Lake Placid’s 1980 Winter Games, at which the superhuman Russian squad fell, embarrassingly, to an upstart U.S. team that eventually claimed gold. Red Army, though, transcends a typical sports doc when it takes on the schism of heroism at home versus a natural gravitation toward Western freedoms. Defections, along with the elaborate style of Russian play, weren’t met warmly by North American hockey fans. (“They’re not here for the Bolshoi ballet,” one announcer snipes.) Yet these athletes find a way, despite moments of wounded national pride, to push through to dignity, climaxing with the surreal sight of an arena of Detroit Red Wings fans cheering on their all-Soviet A-team. Polsky is sometimes awkward in his questioning, but he spurs his interviewees to serious reflection and even nostalgia. Follow Joshua Rothkopf on Twitter: @joshrothkopf

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

The Epic of Everest

It is stunningly rare to be offered a quiet adventure these days—sure, there’s a time and place for digital enhancement and furious editing, but for a change, here’s a taste of something dangerous, wild and raw that hasn’t been sensationalized at all. Those seeking a break from the thrills ’n’ spills of such outdoor-adventure movies as 127 Hours or Alive would do well to investigate this 90-year-old treasure, a restoration of Captain John Noel’s 1924 documentary of a British team’s attempt to climb Everest. The expedition famously resulted in the deaths of two now-legendary climbers, George Mallory and Andrew Irving, and there remains controversy as to whether the men ever reached the summit. But while there is some tantalizing footage here of a cliffside rescue, the film’s mood is dreamlike, to say the least. Black-and-white footage of the Himalayan landscape is accompanied here by a beautiful new score from Simon Fisher Turner, featuring understated chamber orchestrations and authentic Tibetan clanging; watching the film is a quietly mesmerizing experience, along the lines of the Popol Vuh soundscapes in Werner Herzog’s Aguirre, the Wrath of God. The Epic of Everest was a box-office draw in its time, offering a chance to see the mountains but also peek at the lives of Tibetan peasants, portrayed here as filthy and culturally unsophisticated. That upset the Tibetan aristocracy in Lhasa to such an extent that British-Tibetan relations were partially severed, which in turn mea

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

Le Jour Se Lève

Originally heavily censored and then banned in its entirety for being “too demoralizing,” Marcel Carné’s classic work of poetic realism has been released in a glorious 4K restoration that invigorates the original. It also restores several cuts demanded by the Vichy regime in Nazi-occupied France, including a glimpse of a naked Arletty emerging from her bathtub. More importantly, the credits of Jewish crew members are reinstated, including that of Curt Courant, whose extraordinary cinematography, replete with chiaroscuro lighting and vertiginous shooting angles, prefigures American film noir. The film tracks the inevitable unraveling of factory worker François (Jean Gabin) after he kills the absurd vaudeville entertainer Valentin (Jules Berry), his romantic rival for the affections of Françoise (Jacqueline Laurent) and Clara (Arletty). A series of three flashbacks illuminate the events that precede Valentin’s death, as the police slowly close in on François, cornered and chain-smoking. Following on the heels of the recent restoration of Carné’s epic Children of Paradise, the final result is masterful, leaving only a couple of scenes lingering in slightly fuzzy focus.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

The Theory of Everything

At its best (which is often), director James Marsh’s affecting biopic of the cosmos-rattling astrophysicist Stephen Hawking plays deftly against schmaltz. Hawking, a great wit, has always seen the dark humor in his bodily predicament, the ALS-like disease that began robbing the intellectual explorer of his muscular function as early as his university years. The Theory of Everything embraces that irony: This is a Hawking profile in which you’ll see the wheelchair-bound, speech-impaired scientist happily rolling around his living room dressed up like a Dalek from Doctor Who, his children squealing. More substantially, it’s a movie that delivers science in an approachable Neil deGrasse Tyson–like way, one that might turn young people onto big theoretical ideas—as well as turn them onto the enjoyment of problem solving with the right partner. An early scene has a thoughtful professor introducing ruffled Cambridge student Stephen (Eddie Redmayne) to a lab where all the action happens; it’s a lovely moment of quiet inspiration. The film is filled with snazzy visual metaphors: A swirling cup of coffee becomes a symbol for dark and light matter. A formal dance, where Stephen twirls with the future love of his life, Jane (Felicity Jones), twinkles with glowing lights and a hint of the universe falling into place. The film is their story (the script is largely based on the second of Jane Hawking’s two memoirs), and even though it smooths out some of their domestic unease and eventual d

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

Interstellar

Christopher Nolan’s overwhelming, immersive and time-bending space epic, Interstellar, makes Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity feel like a palate cleanser for the big meal to come. Where Gravity was brief, contained and left the further bounds of the universe to our imagination, Interstellar is long, grand, strange and demanding—not least because it allows time to slip away from under our feet while running brain-aching ideas before our eyes. It’s a bold, beautiful adventure story with a touch of the surreal and dreamlike, yet it always feels grounded in its own deadly serious reality. It’s hard to talk about the story without ruining its slow drip of surprises. So let’s be vague: Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) lives with his family—his father-in-law (John Lithgow) and two young kids—in a not-too-distant future where living off huge fields of corn is the only business around. Dust storms brew, and there’s an apocalyptic vibe, as if the Depression of the 1930s has been transplanted to a dying Earth. Cooper has a strong bond with his daughter, Murph (Mackenzie Foy), but when the former pilot is given a chance to head a mission into space, he grabs it. It’s all very messianic. This rough-and-ready everyman’s destiny is to join a secret project to save the Earth, directed by the aging professor Brand (Michael Caine). He blasts into orbit in the company of Brand’s daughter (Anne Hathaway) and two other scientists. This is no bus hop to the Moon: Their aim is to slip through a wormhole near S

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Film

National Gallery

For his latest institutional exploration, the great documentarian Frederick Wiseman turns his inquisitive lens on the employees, patrons and paintings in London’s National Gallery. Time-wise, it’s a midrange production: three hours, longer than cut-to-the-quick features like High School (1968) and Boxing Gym (2010) but shorter than such epic-sprawl tapestries as four-hour-plus Belfast, Maine (1999) and At Berkeley (2013). Stylistically, it keeps with Wiseman’s preference for showing, not telling: no explanatory titles, no talking-head interviews. Just in-the-moment action, observing as the viewing public wanders the galleries and the museum staff—restorers, tour guides, executives—goes about its business. Thematically, however, this is among Wiseman’s densest and best works—one that, after a profoundly emotional start, becomes a much stranger, slippery beast. (Its greatness is cumulative.) The film begins with several heady and moving odes to the viewing public: A museum guide explains to an attentive crowd how a Middle Ages church mural might have seemed alive to its spectators in the dimness of candlelight. (The parallel to cinema is wholly intentional.) A curator discusses with gallery director Nicholas Penny the need to make the various exhibitions—beyond a sure thing like Leonardo da Vinci—more accessible and inviting to the general public. In the most poignant scene (one that a lesser movie would make its tear-jerking finale), a group of legally blind people study Camil

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Movies in theaters: New releases

Film

Dumb and Dumber To

Exactly two decades after Dumb and Dumber first introduced Lloyd Christmas and Harry Dunne (Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels, respectively), cinema’s most improbably tolerable pair of morons is back for a proper sequel that looks like a cash grab but works like a time machine. The Farrelly brothers’ latest is an earnest throwback that plays to the strengths of a filmmaking duo whose sense of humor has always been pitched between classical and outdated. Dumb and Dumber To may not be quite as funny as the first one, but it’s the funniest thing the Farrellys have made since. The kind of movie that features 50-year-old men hot-boxing the back of a hearse with their own farts, Dumb and Dumber To is a refreshingly straightforward rejoinder to a time when the average studio comedy was more self-reflexive than a Kiarostami film. The plot might knowingly mimic the original, but it does so more out of fidelity than laziness: Harry, in dire need of a new kidney, learns that he fathered a daughter in 1991. The mother (Kathleen Turner, whose impressively thick skin is as much a magnet for jokes as it is a shield against them) reveals that the baby was adopted by one of the country’s most brilliant men. Faster than you can make the most annoying sound in the world, Harry and Lloyd are road-tripping to meet the girl at a science conference in El Paso, leaving all sorts of carnage in their wake.  Between Harry forcibly removing Lloyd’s colostomy bag (it’s a long story), a bizarre string of Barbar

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Film

Foxcatcher

Arrestingly made yet oppressive, Bennett Miller’s feeble-brained sports movie focuses, like the director’s Capote (2005), on a true-life crime story. Mark Schultz (Channing Tatum) is a world-champion wrestler forever living in the shadow of his brother, Dave (Mark Ruffalo), also a gold medalist in the sport. Theirs is a complicated relationship in which issues aren’t talked out but physicalized during tough-and-tender training sessions. (A terrific early scene captures their daily gym routine, a tussle that moves from filial intimacy to violence and back again.) Perhaps this explains why Mark feels so drawn to mysterious John du Pont (Steve Carell, transformed into creepiness), an eccentric multimillionaire who showers him with praise and invites him to train at the new facility he’s built on his sprawling estate near Valley Forge. Carell’s gun-loving one-percenter, whom the actor plays as a heavy-lidded burlesque of unbridled affluence, sees wrestling as a way to not only make his mark but to restore a sense of glory to the American empire. (It’s no coincidence that Mark’s new home is located within walking distance of a key site in the Revolutionary War.) Miller sees parallels between Du Pont’s failed, ultimately murderous campaign and the current state of the U.S., with its pronounced economic divides. Screenwriters E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman even set the events, which actually took place over the course of the 1990s, during the right-leaning 1980s to better drive home

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Film

Rosewater

Often on fire behind his Daily Show desk, Jon Stewart turns out to be a merely okay director, judging from this sincere yet serviceable political drama. It's the smallest of disappointments: Why is this gonzo figurehead paying it safe? Nonetheless, Stewart's hardcore fans may give him a pass, especially since Rosewater is cosmic repayment to one of his guests, who found himself imprisoned as a result of the media exposure. London-based Maziar Bahari was covering Iran's 2009 election and subsequent protests when he taped a comic sketch with Daily Show correspondent Jason Jones, who was impersonating a boorish American spy. Less than a week later, Bahari found himself detained and brutalized in a Tehran jail by humorless counterintelligence agents who grilled him for well over three months. Stewart's own screenplay, based on Bahari's 2011 tell-all Then They Came for Me, is strongest when it's playing up the absurdity of the situation, tapping star Gael García Bernal's quickness in an early interrogation when he's asked to defend his DVD collection. (The Sopranos—is it porn?) Even after the blindfolds come out, Stewart lands subversive laughs via the deft performance of Kim Bodnia, portraying a fearsome Iranian "specialist" who falls for a whopper of a lie about New Jersey massage parlors, hotbeds of corruption. But Rosewater's heart lies in telling a serious tale of tragedy, a miscarriage of justice. The film settles into the kind of sobriety you've seen too often: A perseverin

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Film

The Homesman

The West is a grim place in Tommy Lee Jones’s ineffective 19th-century oater, especially for Mary Bee Cuddy (Hilary Swank), a plain-looking Nebraska spinster unlucky in love, if stalwart in spirit. She can hold her own (or so it seems) among the gruff and/or lightly condescending men of her small frontier town. But three other women (Grace Gummer, Miranda Otto, Sonja Richter) aren’t so lucky, their minds succumbing to the harsh realities of life on the American verge. Cuddy volunteers to take the mentally ill trio east to Iowa where they can be sent home to their families. She could use some help, though, and fate fortunately puts disgraced soldier and claim jumper George Briggs (Tommy Lee Jones) in her path. Thus begins a testy, unlikely friendship, one you feel you’ve seen multiple times before despite the best efforts of all involved. Jones, directing his second feature since 2005’s The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, has an eye for sprawling Western landscapes, and cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto gives the images the feel of burned-out daguerreotypes. Yet the script (which Jones, Kieran Fitzgerald and Wesley Oliver adapted from Glendon Swarthout’s 1988 novel) shifts uneasily between tragedy and comedy: A woman throws her baby into the pit of an outhouse one moment, Briggs and Cuddy trade barbs like an open-range Tracy and Hepburn the next. It doesn’t help that Swank never finds a way into her gruff, stolid character or that Jones (mostly phoning in pitiable surliness)

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Film

Big Hero 6

For the past few years, Disney has been redefining its house style on dual tracks: the conscientious princess play of Tangled and Frozen alongside the Comic-Con sensibility of movies like Wreck-It Ralph and now this one. Big Hero 6 has been adapted from an obscure comic owned by corporate sibling Marvel, telling the nonetheless familiar story of Hiro (Ryan Potter), a teenage robotics genius who learns to use his brainpower for good by assembling a science-driven superhero team, including a pudgy nurse robot called Baymax (Scott Adsit). Baymax becomes a clever meditation on the superhero mission: He’s programmed only for gentle helping and healing, not engaging in cool-looking battles, although the movie sometimes downplays that subtext in favor of generic huggability. Fair enough for a movie that should delight kids, but on the adult side, Big Hero 6 proceeds less idiosyncratically than Ralph or Frozen. Despite the Marvel-style origin story, it’s derivative of better Brad Bird cartoons like The Iron Giant and The Incredibles. Still, the animation is fluid and inventive, balancing action and slapstick with aplomb. It’s an enjoyable diversion from a studio that usually offers more.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Film

Horns

“Are you horny?” No one ever asked Daniel Radcliffe questions like that when he was Harry Potter. This patchy supernatural black comedy is his latest and least successful shot at putting distance between himself and the boy wizard. Adapted from a novel by Joe Hill (Stephen King’s son), Radcliffe plays the eccentrically named Ig, the prime suspect for the murder of his girlfriend in the woods outside their sleepy Pacific Northwest logging town. If that weren't bad enough, Ig wakes up one morning with little devil’s horns growing out of his forehead. When he takes his protuberances to his physician to chisel off, the doctor instead admits that he’s obsessed with his teenage daughter’s hot best friend. The horns, it turns out, have a freaky truth-telling power that compels people to confess their deepest, darkest secrets. Naturally, Ig decides to exploit this to discover who really killed his girlfriend. There are some brilliantly twisted scenes, best of all when newly horned Ig visits his supportive hippie parents, who confide that they secretly can’t stand him. But flashbacks to Ig’s relationship with his girlfriend, Merrin (Juno Temple), are silly. In the end, Horns is weird without being interesting. And he might not want to hear it, but Radcliffe was better suited to playing the bruisingly sweet, idealistic beat poet Allen Ginsberg in Kill Your Darlings. He looks too self-conscious here to be believed.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Movie-going in LA

Film

The 11 best movie theaters in Los Angeles

Movie theaters are a dime a dozen here in LA, but these eleven spectacular cinemas are a reel above the rest.

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Best open-air places to watch movies in LA

Love outdoor movies? Enjoy summer nights with this guide to the best places to watch films under the stars.

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Time Out film lists

Film

50 films that best capture the essence of LA

The world knows Los Angeles better than it thinks.

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Film

The 15 most epic surf movies

These 15 films illustrate the pure kinetic pleasure of wave riding.

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Film

The 100 best animated movies

Animation introduces us to the magic of cinema, and we polled over 100 experts to find out why.

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Film

50 great documentaries

As long as there is fantasy in film, audiences will also yearn for the truth—or something close to it.

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Film

Youth-gone-wild films

Some children, adorable though they are, must simply be born bad.

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