Movies

Find Los Angeles movie showtimes, read movie reviews, find theaters in your neighborhood and buy movie tickets here. Plus, browse the top film events in LA.

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The 50 most romantic movies of all time

Spring isn't in the air just yet, but we don't need an excuse to get our hearts pumping.

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The 50 films we can’t wait to see in 2015

A new Bond, Star Wars, and Terminator, plus movies from Scorsese, Spielberg and the Coen brothers.

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2015 Oscar nominees announced

The full list, including surprises and snubs, is here

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Film events this week: critics' picks

Whether you prefer drive-ins, director Q&As or outdoor screenings, we've got you covered.

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Review: Beloved Sisters

Is there a harder era to sexualize than the bewigged 18th century? This flick pulls it off.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies in theaters: Critics' picks

Movies

Appropriate Behavior

“I feel dead inside,” says Desiree Akhavan with the kind of grim conviction that would make even Morrissey look insincere. Given that this NYC indie is Akhavan’s movie debut as writer, star and director, you’d expect nothing less than 100 percent from the 30-year-old—even as the world her character navigates is confusing and ridiculous. She plays Shirin, an Iranian-American hipster trying to recover from a breakup with her girlfriend while finding her niche in boho Brooklyn. It’s shades of Girls, no doubt (Akhavan and Lena Dunham are buddies in real life, and the rising star appears in the new season). Existential conversations take place with a Park Slope Food Coop “walker” lurking in the background; Shirin’s first tentative hookups include an OkCupid date whose idea of going out for a drink is brown-bagging beer while sitting on a stoop. But Appropriate Behavior isn’t all knowing LOLs; there’s a satisfying depth and heart here too, that’s more in line with Annie Hall. Shirin’s abysmal online tryst cuts to an intimate sex-with-the-ex memory that’s blushworthy in all the right ways. Through flashbacks, we watch the couple’s relationship sputter into life and run a wobbly course to its ignominious end (“You’re ruining my birthday,” “You’re ruining my twenties!”). Shirin’s awkwardness may be fashionable, but it’s not affected—she’s genuinely scared to confess her fluid sexuality to her conservative Iranian parents, and doesn’t remotely fit in at her family circle’s bourgie Pe

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Ida

Tragedy hangs like smoke over this spectral, startling return to form for Polish-born, British-based writer-director Pawel Pawlikowski. First and foremost there’s the historical catastrophe of the Holocaust that drives the story, shot in b&w. But there’s also a pervasive, underlying layer of personal hardship and struggle: It doesn’t feel like a stretch to place Ida alongside, say, Roman Polanski’s Macbeth and Elem Klimov’s Come and See, films haunted by the loss of a spouse and a subsequent darkening in the filmmaker’s view of the worldview. First-timer Agata Trzebuchowska is quietly compelling in the title role of an apprentice nun who, on the eve of taking her final vows, leaves the convent for the first time to track down her last surviving relative. But Aunt Wanda (Agata Kulesza) isn’t exactly what Ida was expecting: She’s Jewish, alcoholic, a bedhopper and a ruthless court justice whose once-powerful standing in the Soviet regime of early-’60s Poland is slowly but inexorably waning. Ida is a film built of snapshots: Few scenes run longer than a minute or two, and the dialogue is sparse and functional, in stark contrast with Pawlikowski’s poetic, chatty earlier works like My Summer of Love. In addition, the painterly, painstakingly composed camera angles are all self-consciously “off,” with faces and bodies confined to corners of the empty, TV-square frame. The effect is somewhere between incredible beauty and mounting discomfort: a direct reflection of how sheltered

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

A Most Violent Year

In little over three years and three features, writer-director J.C. Chandor has launched himself into the rare company of uncompromising filmmakers with more than superheroes on the brain. Margin Call (2011), filled with gloriously terse business talk, got him Oscar-nominated. All Is Lost (2013) had virtually no talk but managed to distill the loner essence of its star, Robert Redford, like no one had before. A Most Violent Year, Chandor’s absorbing no-bull NYC drama, further clarifies what might be the most promising career in American movies: an urban-headed filmmaker attuned to economies of place and time, with an eye on the vacant throne of Sidney Lumet. Set in the chilly winter of 1981 (evoked with a minimum of perms and trench coats), the movie starts with a business deal, as Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac, finely anxious), an independent gas-company owner, hopes to close with some Hasidim for a precious piece of waterfront property. He leaves the deal with 30 days to come up with an astronomical sum of money, and it’s right at that moment that his problems mushroom: A politically minded city attorney (David Oyelowo) starts breathing down his neck with aggressive financial queries; Abel’s Brooklyn-born wife, Anna (Jessica Chastain), the daughter of a gangster, grows fidgety; and his gas trucks keep getting hijacked on the parkway. The municipal stew is dense and unusually flavorful, of a kinship with James Gray’s The Yards and other films made for the last handful of adult

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Black Sea

Submarines are such scary places that it’s hard to make a mess of a movie about them. The challenge lies in coming up with a fresh twist on the milieu that doesn’t tread on familiar WWII territory. Kudos, then, to screenwriter Dennis Kelly for this engrossing modern fable, in which a group of disgruntled employees of an ocean salvage company rent an ancient Soviet sub to retrieve lost Nazi gold from the floor of the Black Sea. The grizzled crew all have equal shares, but then they realize that the loss of a shipmate or two would mean a fatter payday for everyone else. Law brings unexpected gravitas to his role as the embittered captain whose desire to wreak revenge on his heartless bosses may be clouding his judgment, and the excellent supporting cast vividly captures the script’s intercrew animosities. Detailed set design also contributes to the oppressive claustrophobia of this undersea Treasure of the Sierra Madre, which oozes atmosphere. If Black Sea runs a few fathoms short of classic status, it’s because director Kevin Macdonald pumps the brakes just when things are picking up. Still, the film’s old-fashioned storytelling makes it a worthy addition to the sub subgenre.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Selma

Do we dare watch Ava DuVernay’s civil-rights drama as a mere piece of historical re-creation (expert though it is), and not as a newscast of what’s happening right now? There’s nothing “finished” about the issue of American racism and fittingly, Selma, unlike so many great-man biopics, lures us into a crucible of unsettled arguments and shifting strategies as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s landmark 1965 Alabama march becomes a reality—at a terrible cost. The film plays like a better episode of Mad Men, pitch-perfect in its details yet fully lived-in: a universe of rolled-up shirt sleeves, sweat-laden brows and screams that don’t sound canned. Meticulously researched and elegantly scripted by debuting screenwriter Paul Webb, Selma toggles between moments big and small, though everything feels necessary. The 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in 1963, an act of homegrown terrorism largely responsible for the drive to action, isn’t announced so much as eased into, as four impeccably dressed girls descend a stairway, chatting about hairdos. We see King (David Oyelowo) grousing about his fancy tie; attended to by a soothing wife, Coretta (Carmen Ejogo); and trotted out to accept his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. His work is far from done: Even as his team makes its way down to Alabama to set up headquarters, King’s reputation precedes him, as does a punch in the face in the hotel lobby. Selma truly takes off, though, in its wonky instances of back-and-forth: Oyelowo brings massive convi

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Citizenfour

In June 2013, after several months of coded messages back and forth, U.S. security worker Edward Snowden summoned three people to a hotel room in Hong Kong to reveal who he was and what he wanted. Two of the three were journalists: freelancer Glenn Greenwald and The Guardian’s Ewen MacAskill. The third was documentary maker Laura Poitras (The Oath), who has now turned 
the behind-the-scenes story of Snowden’s revelations into this movie. Her film’s quiet, matter-
of-fact sobriety is as chilling as 
the information Snowden revealed—that the U.S. and U.K. governments were spying on their citizens to an extent beyond most paranoiacs’ wildest nightmares. Even if you know Snowden’s story, it’s doubly striking when heard here, straight from the horse’s mouth and shared for 
the first time. Partly, Citizenfour 
serves as a concise refresher of 
a complicated story that has 
been developing for over a year. 
Poitras offers helpful background, 
opening her film with the testimony of other whistle-blowers and repeated high-up denials of
their allegations. But Citizenfour is at its most eye-opening—and essential—simply as a portrait of the then-29-year-old at a point of absolute no return as he spends almost a week hiding out before disappearing into an entirely new existence. He talks about his motivations, about leaving his girlfriend a note in their Hawaii home saying that he had gone on a long work trip, about cutting all ties with friends and family, about the near-inevitability

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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The best upcoming movie releases

Movie-going in LA

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The 11 best movie theaters in Los Angeles

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Time Out film lists

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50 films that best capture the essence of LA

The world knows Los Angeles better than it thinks.

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The most romantic movies of all time

Prepare to swoon at our loveliest of lists, the 50 most romantic films of all time.

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The best and worst Disney movies

From Snow White to Frozen, we explore the brilliant best and woeful worst of Disney animated films.

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50 great documentaries

As long as there is fantasy in film, audiences will also yearn for the truth—or something close to it.

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The top 50 sports films of all time

Ahh, sports movies. Victory, defeat, comebacks and a whole lot of ass slapping.

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