Ladyface Ale

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Photograph: Redtail Media
Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
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Photograph: Raj Naik
Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
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Photograph: Redtail Media
Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
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Photograph: Jennifer Rau
Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
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Photograph: Jennifer Rau
Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
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Photograph: Jennifer Rau
Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
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Photograph: Jennifer Rau
Nova ranch wood-grilled burger and duck confit at Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
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Photograph: Courtesy Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
Sliders at Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
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Photograph: Jennifer Rau
French Onion soup and pommes frites at Ladyface Alehouse & Brasserie
San Fernando Valley

This burgeoning microbrewery, which bills itself as an "alehouse & Bbrasserie" is nestled into an unsuspecting strip-mall at the foot of Conejo Valley's Ladyface Mountain, just off Highway 101. Inside, country-pub charm gives way to French, Irish and German influence—an exposed ceiling, low hanging art nouveau light-fixtures illuminate walls adorned with nouveau-posters and thick solid wood tables and café chairs good for small groups and couples are scattered around a long central communal table. About 15 stools wrap around a long rectangular bar, from which two TVs are quite observable—one for baseball and one for football. Brewmaster David Griffiths works just 50 feet from the bar, often popping in an out of the production rooms to chat with guests and answer any questions during tours offered the first Monday of every month. Floor-to-ceiling stainless steel fermentation tanks take up a corner of the pub, offering a definitive reminder that the brews are made in-house.

 

Vitals

Good for: Angelenos living on the West Valley can call on this place for a serious craft-brew fix and French-country pub fare in a family-friendly environment. Gougères ($5) are served with Mornay sauce and are a decadent treat. Ladyface Sliders—offered in three styles: pulled pork, beef or salmon-patties—are an awesome steal for $5, or $8 on the regular menu. Happy hour menu is offered daily from 3pm to 6pm and after 10pm.

The scene: Even the patrons liken this pub to their own “Cheers haven—regulars hold court over the bar, chatting it up with each other and the bartenders mostly over sports news, while students and alums from nearby Pepperdine or Cal Lutheran gather in groups over a round of pints. Parents enjoy a pint over mouthwatering Bouillabaisse ($18) while kids nosh on Mac & Cheese with a salt & vinegar potato chip crust ($8).

The playlist: Throughout the week, live music from jazz and guitar soloists to flamenco, folk, blues, and classic rock bands take over from a soundtrack of the same mixed genres.

The bartender says: Ask about the rotating cask-ale selection, which is tapped and hand-pumped every week and is offered until it runs out (price varies).

Drink this: Ladyface brews offer a range of French and Belgian-styles to hoppy California IPAs and cask-conditioned ales: all by the pint, pitcher or in a growler to-go. Start off with a few tastes of their flagship ales ($1.50-$3 per 5-ounce taste) or a flight of eight brews ($10.50-$14). The La Blonde is a lighter-style Belgian-style brew showing clean citrus and malt ($5 per pint) and for something more rustic the Dérailleur offers rich berry, malty and spice notes ($6 per pint). They also offer rotating seasonal and special releases on tap—currently the Imperial Reyes Adobe Red is a creamy, luscious beer that offers up caramel notes followed by subtle citrus flavors ($6 per pint). About 15 different bottled brews and ciders (6-$34) are available, while French and California wines are sold by the glass ($6-$10) or by the bottle (mostly mid-$20s to upper-$30s).

Venue name: Ladyface Ale
Contact:
Address: 29281 Agoura Rd
Los Angeles

Opening hours: Sun-Tue 11:30am-10pm, Wed-Sat 11:30am-11:30pm
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