Dan Thorpe Residency Show One/ Homecoming && Cali Fragments

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Dan Thorpe Residency Show One/ Homecoming && Cali Fragments
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Format says
To kick off his residency at Format, Dan Thorpe presents his first two releases — California Fragments, and Homecoming (three years later) — in full, back to back in Format's gallery.

Cheap beer // $5 entry if you have a job, free if you don't, more if you're feeling generous.

In retrospect, California Fragments is a reflection on how ideas of productivity, composition and creativity shift when you're seriously mentally ill. I wrote, all up, about twelve bars of music when I first left Australia in 2011-12. It's a strange album to look back on. I remember desperately trying to write and being unable to stick with anything like it was yesterday, but it stands as a work of an enduring want to say something, even when I found it almost physically impossible to address everything I was/wasn't feeling. Like the situation it came out of, what California Fragments is really trying to talk about is being in love but not being able to be 100% there. A sense of place that's frozen and constantly distorting through a feeling that you haven't got long left (in either sense, really). Of nervous quietness. It remains one of my favourite things I've ever written, and I remain proud of my younger self for being around to write it down.

homecoming (three years later) has similarly grim origins, coming from grief and a retreat inwards and away from everything to deal with it. I launched this LP at Format just over a year ago, and from that first performance to now, I am happy to report, things have gotten easier. Maybe there's something about repeatedly opening your wounds for (international/interstate) crowds of strangers, but this album (and especially performing it) has been a process of healing for me. I don't hold much stock in the idea of ~making something from our pain~ as an ideal model for art (I feel like insisting people be productive while they're suffering is probably peak capitalism), I am more than happy to say admit that finding ways of dealing with and being open with your grief helps.
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By: Format