Barcelona for kids

Discover the best the city has to offer for kids and families

Kids

Barcelona for kids

The best family-friendly venues in Barcelona

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Child-friendly places to eat

Restaurants, cafés and fun places to feed the kids

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Restaurants

Ice cream!

Where to get ice cream in all flavours and colours to help you beat the heat. Suitable for parents, too.

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Things to do

Families al fresco

Get out where families and fresh air meet for some quality bonding time with those you love most

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Shopping

Bakeries: O, sweet temptation!

When it's time to stop and refuel with the kids, we've got you covered

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Restaurants for families

Restaurants

Merquén

Merquén is a tasty condiment made ​​from roasted peppers, a legacy of the Mapuche culture that spread to Argentine and Chilean Patagonia. In Chile it's used for seasoning dishes of the finest Andean cuisine. It looks powder with small reddish flakes and is made of the dry and spicy 'cacho de cabra' variety of chili and mixed with coriander seeds, although the Mapuche also include other ingredients. Merquén is also the name Chilean Rolando and Catalan Laia have given their restaurant with Chilean soul and Mediterranean flavour. While there are a number of well-prepared Chilean dishes, Laia puts the Catalan touch on things in the kitchen. Especially when it comes to the tapas. (read more)

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Restaurants

Aguaribay

The best thing you can say about a vegetarian restaurant is that it doesn’t look like one. Forget about the vegetarian clichés of sad tofu salads, here they offer a lunch menu featuring imaginative, tasty, nutritious dishes such as beans with cream of polenta and sage or home-made stuffed pasta, and always with an aperitif tapa included. In the evenings they unveil a range of tapas such as papas arrugas, Argentinean pies, burritos and fajitas. A small, well-chosen selection of wine and beer is available.

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Restaurants

Semproniana

Ada Parellada’s cooking is always fun, fresh and original. It’s worth a visit to see how she has reinterpreted classic French and Catalan cuisine, with some delicious game dishes. Saturday afternoons they host Patacutxi, a cooking workshop for the little ones, ages 4 to 10, while parents can take their time in the dining room.

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Restaurants

Granja Petitbo

On the spot that was a dairy in the early 20th century now stands this café with a Nordic feel and impressive design, where you can indulge yourself in breakfast, lunch and midday snacks including home-made cakes, sandwiches made with care and quality, and lots of different scrambled egg dishes. Their set lunch menu is definitely worth getting to know, and Saturday and Sunday mornings they do a more than decent brunch.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Children's cinema

Film

Song of the Sea

It really doesn’t matter that Song of the Sea tells a story as thin as the line of a pencil or that this tribute to the wistful magic of Irish folklore is so transparently indebted to the films of Hayao Miyazaki that its most crucial moments feel like they were made in Japan. What matters is that Tomm Moore has followed up 2009’s The Secret of Kells with another heartfelt and gorgeously rendered work of 2-D animation, its every blue-gray blotch of watercolor a defiant rejoinder to the rounded plastic sameness that dominates contemporary cartoons. Modernizing an ancient myth with a visual approach that splits the difference between cute and Cubism, Song of the Sea tells the tale of a widowed lighthouse keeper (voiced by the perfectly tender Brendan Gleeson) who decides that the blustery Irish coast is no place to raise his precocious 10-year-old son, Ben (David Rawle), and his curiously mute daughter, Saoirse, who may or may not be half-seal. The kids are shipped to Dublin, and the brunt of the film chronicles their enchanted journey back home, the odyssey unraveling into an exquisitely painted mess when the siblings are waylaid by an old owl witch with a broken heart (Fionnula Flanagan).  No matter how frayed the storytelling becomes, the animation is always suffused with a gentle melancholy; Song of the Sea isn’t just pretty, it’s genuinely transporting. If Moore’s film is so busy ladling on the sweet ethereal frosting of its world that Ben and Saoirse feel less like chara

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Film

Shaun the Sheep the Movie

Only Aardman – the British creators of Wallace & Gromit, Morph and other lovable, mouldable characters – could find an irresistible movie in industrial amounts of clay and a story of an amnesiac farmer and his flock at loose in the big city. Much of the beauty of this big-hearted, stop-motion-animated caper (a spin-off of the insanely successful kids TV series) is the entire absence of decipherable language (instead imagine grunts, mumbles, bleats and screams) as Shaun the Sheep tries to engineer a day off from Mossy Bottom Farm and instead causes the often-bewildered farmer to bang his head and wander off into the metropolis (which looks a lot like Bristol, where Aardman has its HQ). Amid the chaos, it’s sometimes hard to work out exactly which sheep is Shaun, but that doesn’t matter when there are great slapstick scenes in a hospital, a hair salon, a fancy restaurant and an ominous animal pound. Maybe an hour would have been enough, but even the slower patches have charm to burn.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

Home

A smart concept is thoroughly wasted in this cute but grating Dreamworks animated comedy. It opens with an alien invasion – but not one of those messy, bloodthirsty ones. Our new extraterrestrial overlords, the cheerful, squashy Boov, merely want to shift the population of Earth to a new home in Australia – renamed Happy Humans Town – so they can enjoy the rest of the planet in peace. But it’s not long before their plans are threatened by Oh, a renegade Boov voiced tiresomely by US comedian Jim Parsons. He’s helped by a plucky young earthling sidekick, Tip, voiced by singer Rihanna, who also provides a bland, intrusive ‘concept soundtrack’. Spreading its net as widely as possible, ‘Home’ offers pratfalls and moral lessons for little ones, cute cats and slushy pop for the tweeners and snappy cultural references and wannabe-offbeat humour for the older kids. The result is inoffensive but flavourless, crammed with familiar elements from better movies – ‘Lilo and Stitch’, ‘Toy Story’, ‘Despicable Me’ – but lacking any clear identity of its own.

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Film

Cinderella

Enough with the feminism. Disney has clearly had enough of these uppity princesses getting all empowered and messing with their fairytales. After ‘Frozen’, and ‘Into the Woods’, it’s back to the basics of being a princess in director Kenneth Branagh’s lavish, sappily sweet version of ‘Cinderella’. That means microscopic waists, swooning bosoms and a happily-ever-after ending for this Cinderella (Lily James, the naughty cousin from ‘Downton’), or just plain Ella – the ‘Cinders’ bit comes later. The film opens shakily with scenes from Ella’s idyllic childhood acted in a style inspired by the surrounding forest. ‘Have courage and be kind,’ says Ella’s mother (Hayley Atwell) with a saintly deathbed smile, so cursing Ella to a lifetime of smiling sweetly and talking in sing-song to her CGI pet mice. Cate Blanchett is wickedly good as her evil stepmother Lady Tremaine, dressed to kill in the style of a 1940s femme fatale with Veronica Lake curls and blood-red lipstick. This is a pretty faithful retelling of the classic fairytale, but Branagh and screenwriter Chris Weitz (‘The Golden Compass’) have rustled up enough of a backstory to stop Lady T being a straight-up psycho-bitch villainess. Left widowed and bankrupt by her first husband, she’s now bitter about being married to a man still in love with wife number-one. You know the rest. Helena Bonham Carter is hilarious as the Fairy Godmother, a cross between Gok Wan and a toff racing-horse trainer after a few gin and tonics. ‘Woul

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Child-friendly Barcelona

Attractions

Parc d'Atraccions Tibidabo

If there’s one thing kids love it’s a funfair – and the same usually goes for their parents. The amusement park perched at the top of Tibidabo has an otherworldly charm, a hundred years of history and the added attraction of being perched high above Barcelona. With rides for all ages, it’s a day out to remember.

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Attractions

Zoo de Barcelona

The dolphin shows are the big draw, but the decently sized zoo has plenty of other animals, all of whom look happy enough in reasonably sized enclosures and the city's comfortable climate. Favourites include giant hippos, the prehistoric-looking rhino, sea lions, elephants, giraffes, lions and tigers. Child-friendly features include a farmyard zoo, pony rides, picnic areas and two excellent playgrounds. If all that walking is too much, there's a zoo 'train'. Bear in mind that on hot days many of the animals are sleeping and out of sight, and when the temperature drops below 13 degrees many are kept inside.

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Attractions

Barcelona Bosc Urbà (Urban Jungle)

This urban adventure park – the first of its kind in Barcelona – is designed to deliver a monster dose of adrenalin. There are zip lines, nets, rope swings, bungee jumps, bridges and walkways rigged on platforms up to six metres above the ground – altogether more than 50 attractions on the park's various circuits, designed for kids, families and adrenalin junkies of all ages.

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Attractions

L'Aquàrium

The Poble Espanyol brings together reproductions of buildings from all over Spain, but it's more than an architectural curiosity. You can sign up for one of their many workshops – from gardening to pottery – or take part in their family gymkhana, a treasure hunt with clues that will send you out to discover all the village's secret nooks and crannies.

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Museums

MIBA. Museu d'Idees i Invents de Barcelona

Even though the Museum of Inventions and Ideas was originally designed for adults, you won’t be able drag your kids away. Wacky ideas and ingenious inventions suggest a future where anything is possible. And at the Minimiba, 5- to 12-year-olds can submit their own ideas: every month three of the best are turned into prototypes by a team of builders.

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Attractions

Torre de les Aigües

In 1870, the Torre de les Aigües provided water to some of the first houses to be built in the Eixample district. Now, more than a century later, converted into a swimming pool and a small park, it provides fun for young and old alike. As temperatures soar in August, the Torre de les Aigües is a welcoming oasis: relief from the heat and unlimited opportunities for splashing, paddling and generally getting wet.

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More places to take the family