The 100 best romantic movies: the list

Looking for love? Here you’ll find the most romantic movies ever made, from funny romantic comedies to hormonal teen classics

Whether you’re looking for the best romcoms, steamy sex scenes, a teen classic or a little inspiration for your next Netflix binge, there’s something here for everyone. Take a look at our list of the greatest films about romance ever made and let us know if there’s anything we missed in the comments below.

RECOMMENDED: More great romantic movies

The 100 best romantic movies: 100-91

100

Out of Sight (1998)

Director: Steven Soderbergh

Cast: George Clooney, Jennifer Lopez

Best quote: 'Jack, please don't make me do this.'

Defining moment: J-Lo and Clooney get up close and personal in the boot of a getaway car.

Junk in the trunk
It's got to be the sexiest meet-cute in the movies. Clooney is a bank robber who’s just bust out of prison. Lopez is the federal marshal who gets in his way. We already know she likes a bad boy, so when he bundles her into the boot of a getaway car, sparks fly.

The chemistry between Clooney and Lopez is smokin’ hot in Soderbergh’s down-and-dirty adaptation of Elmore Leonard's novel. Sandra Bullock was originally tested for the marshal role, but it’s impossible to believe she would have sizzled like J-Lo. ‘Out of Sight’ will also go down in history as the movie that finally made TV pin-up Clooney a bona fide Hollywood star. CC

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99

Buffalo '66 (1998)

Director: Vincent Gallo

Cast: Vincent Gallo, Christina Ricci

Best quote: 'You adore me, you love me, you cherish me. Jesus Christ you can't live without me.'

Defining moment: Ricci's fantasy tap dance in a deadbeat bowling alley.

I wanna be adored
Nothing about Gallo's winningly strange debut feature approaches romance in a fashion most viewers are likely to recognise, or even desire. Stockholm Syndrome is a tricky concept at the best of times, and when the captor is Billy, a maladjusted, abusive ex-con played by Gallo, it's fair to say our perceptions of love's limits and limitations are being tested.

Yet as Layla, the zoned-out tap dancer Billy kidnaps so she can pose as his wife at his ghastly parents' house, gawkily luminous Ricci somehow persuades us that there's something to be saved in this lonely wastrel – though probably not in their bizarre relationship. It's a love we can believe, even if we can't quite believe in it. GL

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98

Un Chant d'Amour (1950)

Director: Jean Genet

Cast: Java, André Reybaz, Lucien Sénémaud

Best quote: no dialogue

Defining moment: Phallic substitutes (flowers, cigarettes, a pistol) we expect in a film from 1950, but full-on tumescence we don’t.

Let yourself go
Jean Genet had already been discharged from the French Foreign Legion for indecency, bummed around Europe as a thief and rent-boy, and forged a strong literary reputation before he made this silent, clandestinely-shot 26-minute short in 1950. It’s a potent combination of the raw and the poetic, as male prisoners writhe under the lustful eye of a peeping guard, dreaming of encounters metaphorical and corporeal.

Its explicit gaze is still pretty eye-popping by conventional standards, and in 1966 a California court banned ‘Un Chant d’Amour’, pronouncing it ‘cheap pornography calculated to promote homosexuality, perversion and morbid sex practices’. Needless to say, it became an underground sensation (though nowadays it’s on Youtube), and a touchstone for future film-makers including Kenneth Anger, Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Todd Haynes. TJ

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97

The Fabulous Baker Boys (1989)

Director: Steve Kloves

Cast: Jeff Bridges, Michelle Pfeiffer, Beau Bridges

Best quote: 'You're not going to start dreaming about me and waking up all sweaty and looking at me like I'm some sort of princess when I burp?'

Defining moment: Michelle drapes herself atop Jeff’s piano for a smoky rendition of ‘Makin’ Whoopee’.

Another season, another reason
He knows he shouldn’t. She knows she shouldn’t. But they can’t help themselves. For decades, talented but feckless Jeff Bridges has been working hotel lounges in an easy-listening piano duo with his steady-Eddie brother (and real-life sibling) Beau, but when the work dries up they take on a vocalist – Michelle Pfeiffer’s Susie Diamond, a world-weary former escort seeking the showbiz spotlight.

Suddenly, the trio’s a hit, but there’s something in the air between Jeff and Michelle, which could break the act apart if they choose to respond to it. First-time writer-director Steve Kloves matches awkward adult emotions to razor-sharp dialogue, so naturally Hollywood picked him to adapt the ‘Harry Potter’ saga (!). Still, we’ll always have the Airport Ramada… TJ

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96

Doctor Zhivago (1965)

Director: David Lean

Cast: Julie Christie, Omar Sharif, Geraldine Chaplin

Best quote: 'There's an extraordinary girl at this party.' 'I know. I'm dancing with her.'

Defining moment: Years after their parting, Yuri catches a glimpse of his beloved Lara from a crowded tram and runs after her – a mirror image of his first sighting.

A balalaika made for two
If you’ve got more than three hours to spare, David Lean’s epic, slow-burning adaptation of Boris Pasternak’s novel takes a snail-paced, sumptuous journey through this romantic tragedy set in pre- and post-revolutionary Russia. At its heart is the doomed romance between poet Dr Zhivago (Omar Sharif) and Lara (Julie Christie), the ex-wife of a Communist revolutionary (Tom Courtenay).

As in ‘Gone with the Wind’, great events – the First World War, the 1917 Revolution, the Russian Civil War – rumble in the background, and Lean harnesses all the visual splendour you’d expect from the director of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’. How much true passion and romance there is here, though, is debatable and largely a matter of taste. DC

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95

Cyrano de Bergerac (1990)

Director: Jean-Paul Rappeneau

Cast: Gerard Depardieu, Anne Brochet

Best quote: 'You give me milk instead of cream. Say how you love me!'

Defining moment: Cyrano's 'Non, merci!' tirade against the world.

Where’s John Nettles?
Russia’s most celebrated film talent since Eisenstein – the inimitable Gérard Depardieu – achieved the unusual feat of securing an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor in a foreign language film for his portrayal of France’s answer to the Elephant Man.

Despite his unconventional looks, Cyrano is a spectacular lover – at least on paper, writing letters that cause sexy cousin Roxane (Anne Brochet) to fall deeply in love with the man from whom she erroneously believes she’s received the billets-doux – the dashing but inarticulate Christian (Vincent Perez). Unlike José Ferrer, who did win the Oscar for his 1950 portrayal of Cyrano, Depardieu didn’t take home the little gold statue in the end, but it’s probably his take on Cyrano that’s become the more iconic. CB

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94

Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

Director: Arthur Penn

Cast: Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway

Best quote: 'When we started out, I thought we was really goin' somewhere. This is it. We're just goin', huh?'

Defining moment: That orgasmic ending, with the two outlaw-lovers going out in an hail of bullets.

When they met, it was murder
From the start you know this can only end badly. Bonnie Parker has been dreaming her whole life of getting out of Texas. Then along comes Clyde Barrow, a small-time thief – the kind of man momma warned against. Bonnie and Clyde commit their first robbery before they’ve even stopped to find out each other’s name.

Were the real-life Depression era outlaws (whose robbing spree left at least nine policemen and several civilians dead) really as glamorous as Beatty and Dunaway in gangster chic? No, of course not. But as veteran critic David Thomson once wrote, ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ was a film as much about the 1960s as it was about the 1930s: ‘The picture caught the mood of the late 1960s, with kids angry at society.’ CC

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93

The Fly (1986)

Director: David Cronenberg

Cast: Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis

Best quote: 'Help me be human.'

Defining moment: The climax. Is there anything more romantic than attempting to fuse on a genetic level with your intended?

2 become 1
Never underestimate the ability of gross-out director David Cronenberg to elbow his way onto any list, including one that ranks the most romantic movies of all time. His smart update of the 1950s sci-fi classic certainly brings the gore and Frankenstein-ish doom, but it also wins over our hearts.

Real-life couple Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis were expertly cast as a brainiac inventor and curious ace reporter. You never blink when they fall into bed together: ‘The Fly’ vibes on its actors’ obvious smarts and nuanced sense of attraction. The endgame is majestically tragic, as science and ego upend the headiest onscreen pairing since Diane Keaton and Woody Allen. JR

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92

Roman Holiday (1953)

Director: William Wyler

Cast: Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck

Best quote: 'I'm not two hundred years old. Why can't I sleep in pajamas?'

Defining moment: A swooningly sad, near-perfect love-story ending.

I wanna live like common people
A glitzy precursor to ‘Lost in Translation’ that gets drunk on la dolce vita then leaves the kind of bittersweet aftertaste that lingers for a lifetime, William Wyler’s Oscar-winning classic is a fairytale about what happens after the clock strikes midnight.

‘Roman Holiday’ made an overnight star of Audrey Hepburn playing a young European princess who slips out from the suffocating duties of an Italian press tour and crosses paths with an American reporter (Gregory Peck). He concocts a plan to make a killing with the story of the runaway princess while pretending to show her the sights. It’s a given that the pair fall in love during their whirlwind tour of the Eternal City, but their story is ultimately about love lost – and the tenderness with which bliss can suddenly hollow into memory. DE

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91

Submarine (2010)

Director: Richard Ayoade

Cast: Craig Roberts, Yasmin Paige

Best quote: 'This is the moment where you leave him and come with me.'

Defining moment: A fortnight of atavistic lovemaking is turned into the Super-8 footage of memory.

Sperm Wales
15-year old Oliver Tate (Roberts) is desperate to lose his virginity to indifferent pyromaniac Jordana Bevan (Paige). He attempts to convince her with three good reasons: 1. You are fatally in love with me. 2. Best to do it before legal. 3. Bound to be disappointing, so why wait?

Writer-director Ayoade does a superb job of taking Joe Dunthorne's darkly comic debut novel and, rather than turning it into the Brit-com one might expect from somebody so integral to shows like ‘The IT Crowd’ and ‘Garth Marenghi's Dark Place’, he creates a lithe and oddly elegant deadpan romance that recalls the French New Wave at least as much as it does its other clear ancestor, the Adrian Mole books. CB

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See numbers 90-81

The 100 best romantic movies: 90-81

90

Some Like It Hot (1959)

Director: Billy Wilder

Cast: Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon

Best quote: 'Nobody’s perfect!'

Defining moment: Curtis, in disguise as a rich Brit, takes Monroe for a date on someone else’s yacht.

Love comes in spats
The romance in ‘Some Like It Hot’ is very much of the anything-goes, outsider sort. Wilder’s brilliant, high-energy transvestite comedy is a celebration of folk from the other side of the tracks dressed up as a madcap farce in which Curtis and Lemmon spend most of the film disguised as female musicians and on the run from the Chicago mob in 1929. It’s also, of course, a vehicle for Monroe’s beauty, charm and amply-platformed cleavage (seriously, check out her dresses in her two musical numbers).

Most of the fun lies in gender-bending games of mistaken identity that would make Shakespeare proud. But there’s also some real feeling here, both between Curtis and Monroe and, most bizarrely if fleetingly, between Lemmon and an ageing playboy. Delightful and giddy. DC

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89

Let the Right One In (2008)

Director: Tomas Alfredson

Cast: Kåre Hedebrant, Lina Leandersson

Best quote: 'If I wasn't a girl... would you like me anyway?'

Defining moment: Eli crosses the threshold to show Oskar why she needs an invite.

My bloody valentine
Just because a romance is between two twelve year olds, one of whom has been twelve for a really, really long time, doesn't mean it's not a romance. And so what if your new girlfriend a) isn't exactly a girl and b) feasts on the blood of innocents? At least you've got a girlfriend.

Oskar meets Eli at a difficult time in his young life, and quickly learns that the path of true love ne'er did run smooth, nor faint heart win fair maiden. This chilly Scandinavian take on vampire mythology is a pre-teen supernatural romance you can really get your teeth into – and there’s not a sparkly dreamboat in sight. CB

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88

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)

Director: Mike Nichols

Cast: Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton

Best quote: 'You make me puke.'

Defining moment: George shoots his wife, kind of.

Love is a battlefield
Mike Nichols' acid-drenched adaptation of Edward Albee's stage play isn't everyone's idea of a great screen romance, but there's a reason we haven't called this list 100 Great Date Movies.

Yes, rarely has a Hollywood film depicted a marriage more bitter than that of George and Martha, an academic couple who wind up drunkenly airing their very dirty laundry in front of younger colleagues at a drinks party. But it's also an unusually truthful and compassionate study of the lies and defence mechanisms that keep even unhappy couples together. And casting Burton and Taylor as George and Martha – their own famously fraught marriage bleeding into the one they're acting out – was a masterstroke. GL

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87

Tabu (2012)

Director: Miguel Gomes

Cast: Ana Moreira, Carloto Cotta

Best quote: 'It was from a dream...'

Defining moment: The heady strains of 'Be My Baby' filtered through colonial Africa.

Crocodile rock
Passionate exploration becomes possessive colonisation in both an African plantation and a series of romantic relationships in this playful two-act (plus prologue) tragicomedy from former film critic Gomes.

‘Tabu’ insures itself against the risk of coming across as insincere or twee via the cunning expedient of first showing us what will become of its gorgeous leads at the hands of that old inescapable: time. No amount of arch sound design, renegade crocodiles and fish-out-of-water doo-wop bands can offset the foreknowledge of the eventual destinies of steamy star-crossed couple Aurora and Ventura in contemporary Lisbon. CB

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86

Pierrot Le Fou (1965)

Director: Jean-Luc Godard

Cast: Jean-Paul Belmondo, Anna Karina

Best quote: 'I think your legs and breasts are very moving.'

Defining moment: When Belmondo and Karina flee from a burning car.

Bonnie et Clyde
This anarchic romance was made by French New Wave filmmaker Godard at the height of his powers and starred his then-girlfriend Karina and Belmondo, the thick-lipped, brooding star of his earlier ‘Breathless’. It foreshadows ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ in its story of a beautiful, lawless couple leaving polite society behind and going on the run, from Paris to the Med, pursued by gangsters.

It’s a cluttered burst of colours, ideas and emotions – a frantic essay on real life and movie life that overflows with energy and heady thoughts. It looks and feels like an outlaw romance, with Karina and Belmondo bringing style and attitude to the table, but it’s also a strongly experimental work made by someone determined to shake up cinema and the world. That itself is pretty romantic, no? DC

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85

Chungking Express (1994)

Director: Wong Kar-Wai

Cast: Tony Leung, Faye Wong, Takeshi Kaneshiro, Brigitte Lin

Best quote: 'People change. A person may like pineapple today and something else tomorrow.'

Defining moment: Faye Wong’s idea of affection involves rearranging cop Tony Leung’s apartment while he’s on the beat.

The Wong goodbye
Wong Kar-Wai’s third feature remains a perennially fresh declaration of his unique aesthetic, where the accretion of voiceover, music cues, faces and places creates an immersive mood more significant than whatever passes for a plot.

In this instance, that involves two sets of would-be lovers – policeman Kaneshiro falls for shady lady Brigitte Lin, while his colleague Leung circles around winsome kebab-stall girl Faye Wong. Still, the idea of actually getting it together is much less headily intoxicating than the sweet ache of a broken heart, or the woozy rush of unconsummated possibility. Meanwhile, Wong’s stop-go camera captures the restless bustle of pre-handover Hong Kong, and the melancholy sway of the original ‘California Dreaming’ sets the seal on an off-hand masterpiece. TJ

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84

Say Anything (1989)

Director: Cameron Crowe

Cast: John Cusack, Ione Skye

Best quote: 'I gave her my heart, she gave me a pen.'

Defining moment: Come on, like you don’t know. Window. Trenchcoat. Boombox. Peter Gabriel. Iconic.

Rich and strange
Cameron Crowe’s directorial debut may be remembered for That Scene With the Ghettoblaster, but there’s so much more to it than moody John Cusack and his synth-scored adolescent angst.

For one, there’s Ione Skye as his posh-kid paramour, who may suffer from occasional dream-girl tendencies but shows enough spark to justify John’s obsession. There’s also a terrific supporting cast including Frasier’s Dad John Mahoney, Joan Cusack, Jeremy Piven and a magnificently brash and spiky Lili Taylor.

But it’s the sweet, thoughtful, zinger-studded script which explains why, for one brief moment, we actually believed that Crowe could be the next Woody Allen, only with more New Wave hair and classic rock references. Oh, what might have been… TH

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83

Juno (2007)

Director: Jason Reitman

Cast: Ellen Page, Michael Cera

Best quote: 'I still have your underwear.' 'I still have your virginity.'

Defining moment: Baby, schmaby: it’s all about Juno declaring her love for geeky Paulie Bleeker.

Que Cera, Cera
On release, first-time scriptwriter Diablo Cody’s Oscar-winning unplanned teen pregnancy comedy ‘Juno’ was all-but obscured by one debate: was it a pro-lifer tract deceptively gussied up in indie clothing?

The film’s abortion issues are still up for debate; leaving that aside for a moment, what’s left is a sweetly funny romantic comedy about relationships both teen- and middle-aged, and love of many kinds: parental, romantic and platonic. And sure, the teen-speak might bear about as much resemblance to real teenage slang as the actors in ‘Grease’ did to actual teenagers, but Ellen Page and Michael Cera’s performances remain pitch perfect. CB

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82

Beauty and the Beast (1991)

Directors: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise

Cast: Paige O’Hara, Robby Benson

Best quote: 'I love you.' With those three little words, Belle breaks the spell.

Defining moment: Belle teaches the beast to dance.

Monster love
No, not Cocteau’s 1946 masterpiece (you’ll find that at number 17). This is Disney’s magical cartoon, made in 1991 but harking back to the studio’s glory days. Unlike the golden oldies, however, this fairy tale features a plucky heroine, Belle, who braves slathering wolves to rescue her dad from the Beast’s terrifying gothic castle.

In fact, the Beast is a young prince turned into a monster for his cruelty by the curse of an enchantress. Only three little words can break the spell. It’s impossible not to be swept along by the gorgeous Broadway-style song and dance numbers and by what one philosopher called the fairy tale’s ‘great message’ – ‘that a thing must be loved before it is lovable’. CC

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81

Waterloo Bridge (1940)

Director: Mervyn LeRoy

Cast: Vivien Leigh, Robert Taylor, Virginia Field

Best quote: 'Every parting from you is like a little eternity.'

Defining moment: Viv and Bob slow-dancing the ‘Auld Lang Syne Waltz’.

They are in paradise
The young Vivien Leigh will always be remembered for her indomitable Scarlett O’Hara in ‘Gone with the Wind’. But she also displayed heartbreaking fragility in this famous version of Robert E Sherwood’s play, an ill-starred romance ’twixt soldier and ballerina set against the chaos of war.

As WWII breaks out, colonel Taylor finds himself on Waterloo Bridge, assailed by memories of his whirlwind love affair in the same city during the Great War. Cue triple-strength schmaltz in the golden-age Hollywood manner as fate comes between the radiant couple, though not before they’ve shared an all-time classic clinch on New Year’s Eve, breathily smooching as lights are extinguished round a darkening dancefloor. Passion and foreboding in potent harmony. TJ

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See numbers 80-71

The 100 best romantic movies: 80-71

80

Amélie (2001)

Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Cast: Audrey Tautou, Mathieu Kassovitz

Best quote: 'It’s better to help people than garden gnomes.'

Defining moment: Amélie’s heart pounds as she spots her true love or the first time.

Le femme excentrique
Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s whimsical romance arrived out of nowhere in 2001, a surprise international hit that made an overnight star of Audrey Tautou. She plays the elfin Montmartre waitress with an overactive imagination, continually conspiring to play cupid and meddling in other people’s lives. But when Amélie falls in love she can’t bring herself to confront the handsome object of her affections — the risk of making something real is too much for her to handle.

Instead, she lurks in the background, their relationship mediated by whatever cultural detritus she can use to keep a comfortable distance. But anyone who’s heard the rollicking accordion jam that closes Yann Tiersen’s soundtrack knows what it feels like when a little courage goes a long way. Almost impossible to resist. DE

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79

Splendor in the Grass (1961)

Director: Elia Kazan

Cast: Natalie Wood, Warren Beatty, Pat Hingle

Best quote: 'My pride? My pride? I don't want my pride!'

Defining moment: The young lovers break from their frenzied necking as waters symbolically cascade in the background.

Youth in revolt
Rural Kansas, 1928, when ‘nice’ girls were supposed to hold out until the wedding night. Every fibre of her being is telling high-schooler Natalie Wood she wants alpha male Warren Beatty right now, but his oil magnate dad has decided she’s too ordinary for marriage. Welcome to a world before contraception, as acclaimed playwright William Inge’s Oscar-winning script puts in place a devastating conflict between fundamental human desires and layers of obfuscating social hypocrisy.

Both in their early twenties at the time, Beatty and Wood make a sensual couple, as director Kazan constructs a pristine vision of Americana, played against a coruscating narrative where yearning slides uncontrollably into hysteria. Wood’s startling performance deserved an Oscar but got only a nomination. TJ

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78

Once (2006)

Director: John Carney

Cast: Glen Hansard, Marketa Irglova

Best quote: 'What's the Czech for “Do you love him”?'

Defining moment: In a local music shop, an impromptu jam session between the two near-strangers shapes the gorgeous, Oscar-winning ballad ‘Falling Slowly’.

Busking out all over
On paper, everything about this microbudget Irish folk musical sounds insufferably precious: on the streets of Dublin, a struggling thirtysomething busker meets a shy Czech flower seller and they form an immediate bond over his songs, from which a chaste will-they-or-won’t-they flirtation evolves as they proceed, quite literally, to make sweet music together.

Yet there’s a rare authenticity and sincerity to this intimate miniature that never so much as grazes the gag reflex, from the gentle chemistry of the non-professional, refreshingly non-pretty leads (collaborators and lovers in real life) to the naked emotional candour of their songs (one of which won a deserved Oscar) to the heartbreaking matter-of-factness with which the film resolves their ambiguous relationship. A wisp of a love story, but a perfect one. GL

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77

Holiday (1938)

Director: George Cukor

Cast: Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Doris Nolan

Best quote: 'Compared to the life I lead, the last man in a chain gang thoroughly enjoys himself.'

Defining moment: Grant and Hepburn perform somersaults to announce their anti-establishment credentials.

Pack up your troubles
If you love ‘The Philadelphia Story’ then do catch Hepburn in this previous adaptation of a Philip Barry play as an independent-minded young woman stymied by her conservative family. She senses a kindred spirit in youthful Grant’s Johnny Case, who plans to leave his self-made career behind and travel the big, wide world. The complication is that he’s engaged to her alluring sister Nolan.

Yes, the theatrical origins are only too obvious, but glittering dialogue and sparkling star turns pave the way to a surprisingly affecting ending. Grant is unusually goofy, skillfully masking his character’s contradictions, while Hepburn’s trademark display of determined intelligence remains the key to a film that thrives on the notion of liberating elopement. TJ

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76

Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994)

Director: Mike Newell

Cast: Hugh Grant, Andie MacDowell

Best quote: 'In the words of David Cassidy, when he was still with The Partridge Family, I think I love you.'

Defining moment: When Grant’s Charles makes a stuttering declaration of love to MacDowell’s Carrie on the sunny South Bank.

This is mumblecore
It was the little film that could, an infectiously charming low-budget British romcom that crushed the box office, taking £150 million worldwide and cementing the reputation of Brits in the minds of Americans as quirky and eccentric – if a little sweary.

Writer and romcom supremo Richard Curtis wasn’t keen on casting Hugh Grant as his alter ego Charles at first. The seventy-second actor to audition, Curtis thought Grant too good-looking to play the hopeless Englishman and serial monogamist. But it worked, and he went on to cast the actor in ‘Notting Hill’ and ‘Love, Actually’.

And thank heavens that Curtis managed to fend off American financial backers who hated the film’s title and suggested changing it to ‘True Love and Near Misses’, ‘Loitering in Sacred Places’ or ‘Rolling in the Aisles’. CC

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75

City Lights (1931)

Director: Charlie Chaplin

Cast: Charlie Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill

Best quote: 'Tomorrow the birds will sing.'

Defining moment: The formerly blind flower girl recognises the man she fell in love with by touch alone.

The eye of the beholder
The swan song for the silent era arrived several years after talkies had established themselves as dominant, and it came from a giant who insisted that the old ways were poetry enough. Charlie Chaplin was right, of course: ‘City Lights’ is a movie that’s impossible to improve upon, a gorgeous romance between a tramp and a blind flower girl that breathes the rare air of mythic fable.

Romantically speaking, the heartbreaker comes in the film’s final seconds, in which the tramp’s identity is finally revealed to his love interest, who can now see. On Chaplin’s face, we see shame intermingling with fear and, ultimately, euphoria. Cribbed by Federico Fellini and Woody Allen for similar endings, it’s the greatest close-up in movie history. JR

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74

Silver Linings Playbook (2012)

Director: David O Russell

Cast: Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence

Best quote: 'I love you. I knew it from the moment I saw you. I'm sorry it took me so long to catch up.'

Defining moment: Tiffany meets Pat’s dysfunctional parents.

Crazy in love
You know that moment when you meet someone for the first time and something clicks? Maybe you bond over a mutual hatred of beetroot. Or love the same film? That’s exactly what happens to Pat (Bradley Cooper) and Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence) in ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ – except it’s anti-depressant side effects they bond over.

He’s recovering from a nasty manic episode. She’s been sleeping around since her husband died (‘I'm just the crazy slut with a dead husband!’) As romcoms go, this is awkward and messy, but motors on offbeat energy and a fast-paced wisecracking script. It’s a date movie with a beating heart, a story that believes in love. A happy pill of a film. CC

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73

The Notebook (2004)

Director: Nick Cassavetes

Cast: Ryan Gosling, Rachel McAdams

Best quote: 'Do you think our love can make miracles?'

Defining moment: That snog in the rain, just after Allie learns about the 365 love letters from Noah that she never received.

The world gets Gozzled
The, er, literary oeuvre of Nicholas Sparks has been churned into an awful lot of insipid Hollywood schlock – nobody past puberty got misty-eyed over Miley Cyrus in ‘The Last Song’, and surely no one of any age remembers Kevin Costner in ‘Message in a Bottle’.

On the face of it, it’s hard to say why the aggressively sentimental ‘The Notebook’ is any different. But there’s something so earnest about the way this star-crossed teen romance – he’s a common country boy, she’s a beautiful heiress, you do the math – hits its clichéd marks that the film itself takes on the unassailable, idealistic purity of first love. Magic casting, too: here’s where the world’s love affair with Ryan Gosling started, before he got way too cool for this sort of thing. GL

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72

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1988)

Director: Philip Kaufman

Cast: Daniel Day-Lewis, Juliette Binoche, Lena Olin

Best quote: 'I don't understand how someone can make love without being in love.'

Defining moment: Lena Olin clambers over a mirror, reflecting the film's running theme of solitary sexuality.

Je t’aime... moi non plus
Some of the greatest love stories hinge on denial rather than devotion. Philip Kaufman's shiveringly erotic adaptation of Milan Kundera's 1968-set novel – which many thought too tangled up in its characters’ psychologies to be filmed at all – is remarkable for the romance it builds around a man with no desire to be in love.

Daniel Day-Lewis is ideally cast as Tomas, a young Czech surgeon whose pursuit of an emotion-free sex life is fostered and challenged, respectively, by Lena Olin's uptown artist and Juliette Binoche's sincerely adoring country waif. Between and beyond this brittle love triangle are some of the sexiest sex scenes ever put to celluloid, as the Prague Spring withers and the true cost of free love is learned. GL

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71

Head-On (2004)

Director: Fatih Akin

Cast: Birol Ünel, Sibel Kekilli, Catrin Striebeck

Best quote: 'Are you strong enough to stay between me and her?'

Defining moment: Devil-may-care Ünel celebrates his newfound love by shredding his hands in broken glass and dancing bloodily on stage with a Turkish dance band.

Culture crash
Judging by his ravaged-rocker looks, Turkish-born, Hamburg-resident Birol Ünel is heading for oblivion by the scenic route – drink, drugs, sex, argy-bargy – and that’s before he drives his car head-on into a wall. The last thing he needs while recovering in a psychiatric unit is an offer of marriage from fellow patient Sibel Kekilli, another Turkish-German misfit of equally volatile temperament.

The mayhem which follows has a lot to say about the travails of growing up between two cultures – one ultra-liberal, the other repressive – but amid all the rage, blood and aggro of a truly headbanging storyline, there’s a profoundly moving recognition of the power of love to bring meaning and commitment where previously only existed substance-fuelled nihilism. A stone-cold modern classic. TJ

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See numbers 70-61

The 100 best romantic movies: 70-61

70

Bright Star (2009)

Director: Jane Campion

Cast: Abbie Cornish, Ben Whishaw

Best quote: 'In what stumbling ways a new soul is begun.'

Defining moment: The unpromising first meeting between Fanny Brawne (Cornish) and John Keats (Whishaw) is so spiky and sweet it’s like a screwball comedy in period dress.

A wild surmise
Sometimes the line between disaster and perfection is alarmingly fine. By all rights, ‘Bright Star’ should’ve been awful: a simpering love story between a fey poet and a bolshy society girl, all bulging bodices and whispered nothings. But then Jane Campion grabbed the reins as director, and produced perhaps the most intense and mesmerising romantic film of the century so far, a gorgeous, gossamer-light look at love as living poetry.

The Georgian trappings are beautifully designed, but they’re never allowed to overwhelm the story: this could’ve been shot in sackcloth on a sound stage and it would still have been deeply moving. The two leads are wonderful, but the real acting honours are unexpectedly stolen by Paul Schneider as Keats’ colleague Charles Brown, whose snappy Scots irascibility somehow allows the central romance to shine out all the brighter. TH

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69

Singin' in the Rain (1952)

Directors: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly

Cast: Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, Jean Hagen

Best quote: 'Here's one thing I learned from the movies!'

Defining moment: When Kathy (Reynolds) jumps out of a cake in front of Don (Kelly) at a party.

Stormy weather
The story of the transition from silent movies to the 'talkies' has created a sub-genre all of its own, including movies from 'Sunset Blvd' (1950) to 'The Artist' (2011). Here, it's a light-hearted affair set in the late 1920s as silent star Don Lockwood (Kelly) bumps into Kathy Selden (Reynolds), a chorus girl, when he leaps into her car and she pretends to be a serious actress.

It's a classic case of chilly antagonism thawing into true love as Don and Kathy finally fall for each other and become colleagues when his studio wants to make a talking picture and she has to step in to replace the unappealing voice of movie star Lina Lamont (Hagen). But more famous than any romance, surely, is the opening-credits song-and-dance sequence of Kelly and co performing the title tune? DC

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68

Wings of Desire (1987)

Director: Wim Wenders

Cast: Bruno Ganz, Solveig Dommartin

Best quote: 'That's what makes me clumsy. The absence of pleasure. Desire for love.'

Defining moment: She flies through the air with the greatest of ease, that lonely young woman on the flying trapeze.

From her to eternity
Long before his face became part of a thousand ‘Downfall’ memes on Youtube, Bruno Ganz played an angel in love with a mortal trapeze artist in West Berlin, in Wim Wenders’s romantic metaphysical fantasy. Employing a similar coded combination of colour and black and white to Powell and Pressburger's ‘A Matter of Life and Death’, the celestial perspective is purer but more remote, asking us to consider the appeal of everyday humanity from the outsiders' point of view.

Check out the loose Nicolas Cage remake ‘City of Angels’ if you'd like to see a Hollywood spin on the same big questions (‘Never date a man who knows more about your vagina than you do.’). CB

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67

Moulin Rouge! (2001)

Director: Baz Luhrmann

Cast: Nicole Kidman, Ewan McGregor

Best quote: 'Come what may, I will love you until my dying day.'

Defining moment: David Bowie, Elton John, The Beatles and more are pressed into service in one mega-mixed Elephant Love Medley.

Nothing left toulouse
Baz Luhrmann takes the lavish staging of Bollywood, mashes up elements of the Greek myth of Orpheus together with Giuseppe Verdi's opera La Traviata, and throws it all into a kaleidoscopic blender along with some of the catchiest Western pop songs of the 20th century.

As with Luhrmann's inspirations, events are entirely passion-powered, as Ewan McGregor's ‘oh-so-talented, charmingly bohemian, tragically impoverished’ writer Christian conceives an amour fou for Nicole Kidman's courtesan Satine, serenading her with lines like ‘the greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return’. Of course, given the consumptive Satine is carrying more tuberculosis bacteria than your average badger colony, the greatest thing she's likely to have passed on to poor old Christian is a highly infectious lethal disease. CB

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66

Betty Blue (1986)

Director: Jean-Jacques Beneix

Cast: Béatrice Dalle, Jean-Hugues Anglade, Gérard Darmon

Best quote: 'There comes a moment when the silence between two people can have the purity of a diamond.'

Defining moment: The single-take opening, a full-on naked shagfest, sets the tone of uninhibited passion.

Vive la difference!
Amour fou: the French invented the term and this shows you why. In her very first movie, the 21-year-old Béatrice Dalle delivered a career-defining performance which transcends mere pouting petulance to embody a wide-eyed, crockery-smashing, blade-wielding, bush-flashing rage to live. Struggling writer Anglade does his best to provide the unconditional affection she craves, but will anything be enough to quieten Betty’s inner torment?

Quintessentially French, quintessentially ’80s, as ‘Diva’ auteur Beneix revels in an eye-popping palette of electric blues, neon yellows and lipstick crimson. Tellingly, it’s best experienced in the deliriously grandiloquent 186-minute director’s cut rather than the more familiar but deeply compromised two-hour release version, which struggles to make sense of Betty’s extreme psychology. TJ

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65

The Graduate (1967)

Director: Mike Nichols

Cast: Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, Katharine Ross

Best quote: 'Would you like me to seduce you?'

Defining moment: Dustin Hoffman, Paul Simon, Art Garfunkel, a red Alfa Romeo Spider and the Southern California highway system.

We’d like to help you learn to help yourself
How romantic is ‘The Graduate’, really? Are we talking about the affair between Benjamin Braddock (Hoffman) and Mrs Robinson (Bancroft), in which he’s driven by adolescent lust and gnawing boredom, and she by a desperate desire to revisit her youth, to feel something, anything for a change? Or do we mean the engagement between Benjamin and Mrs Robinson’s daughter Elaine (Ross), in which both characters appear to be marching through some sort of societally mandated courtship routine, without ever really meeting in the middle?

And yet, despite the cynicism and the ironic distance, despite that frankly terrifying closing shot of Ben and Elaine on the bus, miles distant, there’s still something bracing and heartfelt about ‘The Graduate’. Perhaps in showing us all this tragic emptiness, Nichols is encouraging us to confront it. TH

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64

Jules et Jim (1962)

Director: François Truffaut

Cast: Jeanne Moreau, Oskar Werner, Henri Serre

Best quote: 'One is never completely in love for more than a moment.'

Defining moment: Catherine throws herself into the Seine.

Three’s a crowd
Truffaut’s freewheeling tale of a menage à trois burns as brightly today as it did in 1962, tripping along on playful New Wave energy. Moreau is unforgettable as force of nature Catherine, who steals the hearts of two young writers in 1910s Paris. Catherine is Jules’s girl. She’s not beautiful or intelligent, but she is a real woman, he says. The three skip around Paris together. Life’s a holiday.

One night, as the two men spout nonsense about a Strindberg play, Catherine hurls herself into the Seine. She’s unpredictable like that. Later, when she switches allegiances to Jim, Jules can’t bear to be apart from her. Let Jim have her, but let her stay in his life. The years can’t dim the warmth or humanity of Truffaut’s third (and best) film. CC

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63

The Crucified Lovers (1954)

Director: Kenji Mizoguchi

Cast: Kazuo Hasegawa, Kyôko Kagawa

Best quote: 'The heavens won’t punish me if, in the final moment of my life, I am unable to hold back these last words: I have always loved you with all of my being.'

Defining moment: In a rickety boat on a midnight lake, on the verge of suicide, two runaways realise they’re passionately in love.

Always look on the bright side of life
Adapted from an ancient Japanese fable, ‘Chikamatsu Monogotari’ sees master director Kenji Mizoguchi prove his worth alongside the likes of Shakespeare and Thomas Hardy as an all-time master of the populist romantic tragedy. It’s the tale of a simple clerk, Mohei (Hasegawa), who does a slightly crooked but well-meant favour for the boss’s wife, Osan (Kagawa), and, in the ensuing fallout, is forced to go on the run with her, accused of adultery, for which the penalty in seventeenth-century Japan was public crucifixion.

So begins a thrilling, devastating journey through the hinterland, as the forces of propriety and tradition band together to frustrate the lovers’ happiness. Unabashedly sentimental but rich with meaning and subtle purpose, Mizoguchi’s film teaches us that one moment of reckless love is worth more than a lifetime of socially approved loneliness. TH

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62

Gregory's Girl (1981)

Director: Bill Forsyth

Cast: John Gordon Sinclair, Dee Hepburn, Clare Grogan

Best quote: 'Hard work being in love, eh?'

Defining moment: Gregory (Sinclair) realises that the women in his life have all ganged up to get him into the ‘wrong’ girl’s clutches.

The beautiful game
Figuring out who we’re in love with is, of course, a key part of the romantic process. Too many films feature lightning-bolt moments, where the rightness of a match is obvious and irrevocable – cue happy ending. So it’s nice that there are a few movies out there saying, well, hang on a minute. Love at first sight is all very well, but isn’t that a rather shallow and reckless way to select a mate?

‘Gregory’s Girl’ starts with the lightning bolt – gangly Glaswegian Gregory spots leggy keepy-uppy expert Dorothy (Hepburn) – then patiently explains why, for someone as irrational and irregular as Gregory, that kind of perfect love probably won’t work. So why not try someone a little closer to home? The result is pragmatic, sure, but that doesn’t make it any less romantic. TH

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61

Secretary (2002)

Director: Steven Shainberg

Cast: Maggie Gyllenhaal, James Spader

Best quote: 'Who's to say that love needs to be soft and gentle?'

Defining moment: Lee reads back a mistyped letter and gets spanked for the first time.

Taking down the particulars
Before there was ‘Fifty Shades Of Grey’, there was E Edward Grey (James Spader), a boss who exercises a penchant for strict discipline on new hire Lee (Maggie Gyllenhaal). In contrast to ‘Fifty Shades…’, which metastasised out of ‘Twilight’ fan fiction, the literary origins of ‘Secretary’ are more respectable: a short story by Mary Gaitskill, whose writings about BDSM go a bit deeper than the recent bonkbusters.

The skewed romance at the heart of ‘Secretary’ is beautifully played; the characters never come off as dabblers trying to spice things up a bit with fluffy-cuffed role-play, but as submissive and dominant to the core of their sexual identities. CB

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See numbers 60-51

The 100 best romantic movies: 60-51

60

(500) Days Of Summer (2009)

Director: Marc Webb

Cast: Joseph Gordon Levitt, Zooey Deschanel

Best quote: 'This is a story of boy meets girl, but you should know upfront, this is not a love story.'

Defining moment: A post-coital Tom struts to work to Hall & Oates’s number ‘You Make My Dreams’.

Cynical attraction
A post-modern post-mortem of love – or something like it – ‘(500) Days Of Summer’ introduces us to Tom (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) and Summer (Zooey Deschanel), a lady since invoked in countless discussions of that stock indie romcom character, the Manic Pixie Dream Girl.

A trainee architect working as a greetings card writer, Tom falls hard for the kooky charms of his boss’s new secretary, despite the advice of friends who warn him off and Summer herself, who tells him she doesn’t believe in love. Against all the odds, the couple bond over a shared affection for little-known balladeers The Smiths – and the rest is non-linear narrative history. CB

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59

The Way We Were (1973)

Director: Sydney Pollack

Cast: Barbra Streisand, Robert Redford, Bradford Dillman

Best quote: 'When you love someone… you go deaf, dumb and blind.'

Defining moment: The first sight of Babs and His Bobness as 1930s college students.

Let’s call the whole thing off
‘Scattered pictures from the corners of my mind…’ Alan and Marilyn Bergman’s lyrics and Marvin Hamlisch’s melody proved an Oscar-winning combination, bolstering the already considerable star power which has long made this a mums’ favourite. Barbra Streisand is a bolshy, strident Jewish lefty, Redford a WASP prince out to further his own literary career. They seem like chalk and cheese, but such is the stuff of romantic sagas.

That said, the movie never seems quite sure whether it’s unabashed retro-styled escapism or a serious look at the currents of US politics leading to the cultural strife of the ’50s – though the studio’s slashing cuts to the McCarthy-era footage certainly tip it towards the former. Like the song says, ‘Misty watercolor memories, of the way we were’. TJ

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58

An Officer and a Gentleman (1982)

Director: Taylor Hackford

Cast: Richard Gere, Deborah Winger, Louis Gossett Jr

Best quote: 'I got nowhere else to go!'

Defining moment: That ’80s-tastic finale, with Richard Gere in naval whites and ‘Up Where We Belong’ on the soundtrack.

Come on and join your fellow man
‘Star Wars’ showed the movie business that audiences were ready for old-fashioned stories in shiny new packaging, and this mega-hit melodrama took a not-dissimilar approach. Old Hollywood might have pictured the local girl trying to keep her honour yet win the heart of a dashing navy recruit. Here, Richard Gere hogs the limelight as the would-be flyboy learning to love someone other than himself – while Debra Winger alternates good-girl and bad-girl moves.

It’s far from subtle, but certainly delivers more grit than a payload of weepy master Nicholas Sparks’ adaptations. And the big hit single made the image of uniformed Gere ubiquitous for a while – provided you could get goggle-eyed, windmill-armed vocalist Joe Cocker out of your mind. TJ

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57

It Happened One Night (1934)

Director: Frank Capra

Cast: Claudette Colbert, Clark Gable

Best quote: 'I don't know very much about him, except that I love him.'

Defining moment: The pre-censor motel room scene, in which the two unmarried travelling companions use a sheet slung over a washing line to protect their dignity.

Greyhounds of love
When was the romcom born? Ask the experts and plenty will answer that it all began with Frank Capra’s 1934 screwball comedy. Look closely and you’ll see ingredients that have been tossed together ever since: a couple who can’t stand the sight of each other, shotgun-speed bickering and the sudden slap-the-forehead realisation that they are crazy about each other. Claudette Colbert plays a spoilt society heiress who runs away from home to marry a fortune hunter only to fall in love with a rascally newspaper reporter (Clark Gable) en route.

After shooting, Colbert said to a friend: ‘I just finished the worst picture in the world.’ The world thought differently. A sleeper hit (Hitler and Stalin were both fans), ‘It Happened One Night’ became the first film to sweep the board at the Oscars – winning all five major awards. Eighty years later, it’s still irresistible. CC

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56

The Philadelphia Story (1940)

Director: George Cukor

Cast: Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, James Stewart

Best quote: 'The course of true love gathers no moss.'

Defining moment: Brittle ice-queen Tracy (Hepburn) has her eyes and her heart opened following a few choice words from her disappointed Dad.

A little taste of heaven
Look up ‘fizzy’ in a film dictionary and you’ll find a shot of Katharine Hepburn as Tracy Lord (no relation to the porn star), the snappy, snippy, self-regarding heroine of Cukor’s magnificent country house comedy.

Taking his cues from Shakespeare (it could comfortably have been retitled ‘Much Ado About a Midsummer Night’s Shrew-Taming’), playwright Philip Barry weaves a tangled web of delicious misunderstandings and deliberate misdemeanours as three mismatched men – sarky but self-improved ex-husband Grant, youthfully exuberant writer Stewart and dull, well-meaning fiancé John Howard – take it in turns to tilt at Hepburn’s hard-nosed heiress. And if there’s a sneaking suspicion at the end that she picked the wrong one – ‘Four Weddings’-style – that’s all part of the film’s restless, headspinning charm. TH

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55

Show Me Love (1998)

Director: Lukas Moodyson

Cast: Rebecca Liljeberg, Alexandra Dahlström, Erica Carlson

Best quote: 'We must be out of our damn minds. But we are so fucking cool.'

Defining moment: An impulsive snog in the back of a car as Foreigner’s ‘I Want to Know What Love Is’ cranks up on the soundtrack.

I know you can show me
The original Swedish title of Moodyson’s gem-like début is actually ‘Fucking Amal’, a declaration of sheer outrage at being teenage and ready for anything in a provincial backwater where nothing ever happens. Liljeberg’s mousy misfit harbouring unrequited feelings is almost a standard-issue protagonist in these circumstances, but Moodyson shows his insight by depicting blonde bombshell Dahlström, the object of her affections, as a time-bomb of hormonal and existential frustration herself – so creating tantalising romantic possibilities between them.

Spot-on in its registering of bitter class realities and affectionate regard for the sheer uselessness of the adolescent male, this is a funny, true and eventually stirring rallying call for anyone who’s ever thought or felt different. And it even makes Foreigner sound heart-pumpingly fab. TJ

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54

It's a Wonderful Life (1946)

Director: Frank Capra

Cast: James Stewart, Donna Reed

Best quote: 'Why don't you kiss her instead of talking her to death?'

Defining moment: A bell rings in Bedford Falls – an angel has earned his wings.

No man is an island
Stewart put in a career-defining performance in this inverted Christmas Carol fable. He plays good-hearted but despairing small town family man George Bailey, who, in the ultimate Capra premise, is brought back from the brink by an angel showing him what would have happened if he'd never been born.

The first film Capra made after returning from World War II, the picture celebrates what Ken Loach's 2013 documentary identifies as ‘The Spirit of '45’ – communities doing the right thing for working families instead of relentlessly pursuing cold hard shiny profit. Perhaps it's indicative of how pie-in-the-sky these simple values seem to contemporary society that we're classing ‘It's a Wonderful Life’ as a romance. CB

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53

Edward Scissorhands (1990)

Director: Tim Burton

Cast: Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder

Best quote: Kim: 'Hold me.' Edward: 'I can’t.'

Defining moment: Kim dances in the ‘snow’ Edward makes from an ice sculpture in sunny California.

Cuts you up
The scariest thing about Burton’s gothic fairy tale is reading the list of actors who were considered for the part of Edward, the man with scissors for hands created by a scientist. The studio insisted Burton meet Tom Cruise (who believed the story needed a ‘happier ending’). Michael Jackson badly wanted the part. Tom Hanks turned it down.

Finally, Burton got his way and cast Johnny Depp, who, like a Camden goth Charlie Chaplin, plays Edward with a dash of slapstick and sad-eyed loneliness (watch Edward’s scissor fingers twitch when he’s nervous). It was the beginning of a beautiful friendship between Depp and Burton, who’ve made seven films together since. Not such a happy ending for Depp and his co-star and then-girlfriend, Ryder. They split in 1993. CC

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52

Notorious (1946)

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Cast: Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant, Claude Rains

Best quote: 'There's nothing like a love song to give you a good laugh.'

Defining moment: The stars lock lips in the wine-cellar, but is it real or play-acting?

A spy in the house of love
Is ‘Notorious’ really a romantic classic? It’s about a young German woman (Ingrid Bergman) hired by the American government’s most slippery and amoral operative (Cary Grant) to prostitute herself to a powerful, Rio-based Nazi (Claude Rains) in the hopes of gaining information. Naturally, she falls in love with her handler – and naturally, he treats her like dirt.

And yet…it does contain the single most smoking-hot kiss in film history (Hitchcock had Bergman and Grant break off then dive back in again to defy the censors, who ruled that on-screen kisses should last no longer than three seconds). For those who like their romance with a bleeding edge of danger, self-loathing and cruelty (you know who you are), ‘Notorious’ hits the mark dead on. TH

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51

An Affair to Remember (1957)

Director: Leo McCarey

Cast: Cary Grant, Deborah Kerr, Richard Denning

Best quote: 'There must be something between us, even if it's only an ocean.'

Defining moment: The unbearable tension in the final reel. We know something Cary Grant is about to find out.

Ship to shore
A playboy (Cary Grant) and a chanteuse (Deborah Kerr) fall in love on a transatlantic liner. Both are already attached but when they dock at New York, they agree to meet at the Empire State Building in six months’ time. Such is the set-up for one of Hollywood’s most imperishable romances, which Leo McCarey first directed in 1939 as ‘Love Affair’ (starring Charles Boyer and Irene Dunne) and remade in 1957 as ‘An Affair to Remember’.

There’s another version, 1994’s ‘Love Affair’ – a tepid showcase for Warren Beatty and Annette Bening. But as any fan of ‘Sleepless in Seattle’ will tell you, the 1957 film is the most enduring, allowing Grant to play simmering passion beneath a debonair exterior, while Kerr suggests fervent yearning behind that reserved front. Hokey? Yes. Manipulative? Certainly. But we defy you not to blub like Meg Ryan. TJ

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See numbers 50-41

The 100 best romantic movies: 50-41

50

His Girl Friday (1940)

Director: Howard Hawks

Cast: Rosalind Russell, Cary Grant

Best quote: 'You’ve got an old-fashioned idea of divorce as something that lasts forever. Till death do us part.'

Defining moment: Hildy tries to tell Walter she’s getting married but can’t get a word in edgewise.

Takes two to tango
Howard Hawks’s spin on the play ‘The Front Page’ sees Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell both giving performances for the ages. He is Walter Burns, a pushy, charming newspaper editor; she’s Hildy Johnson, a former star reporter on his newspaper. Oh, and she’s also his ex-wife.

When Hildy visits the newsroom to say goodbye, she and her new fiancé Bruce (Ralph Bellamy) get sucked into Walter’s world as he takes them out to lunch and tries to tempt Hildy back to the job to report on the case of a convicted murderer about to be unfairly executed. As Walter tries every trick in the book to undermine Bruce and Hildy’s plans, Hildy finds herself being seduced once more by the world of journalism. But will she also be seduced by her deeply persuasive ex-husband? The film is fast, funny and stylish, and romance is a whirlwind in Hawks’s screwball world. DC

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49

West Side Story (1961)

Directors: Jerome Robbins, Robert Wise

Cast: Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer, Russ Tamblyn

Best quote: 'There’s a place for us, somewhere…'

Defining moment: It’s as camp as Christmas, but Maria (Wood) singing ‘I Feel Pretty’ while anticipating her next date with Tony (Beymer) is a magical moment of romantic exuberance.

The song of the streets
Baz Luhrmann’s ‘Romeo + Juliet’ may have made all the tweeners’ hearts melt (and scored a higher place on this list), but the real hep chicks and finger-poppin’ daddies know which version of Shakespeare’s play is the real leader of the pack.

‘West Side Story’ is like no other musical: sure, it’s sappy (‘Mariaaaaaaaaaa’) and slightly ridiculous, but it’s also brazenly political (‘if you’re all white in A-me-ri-ca!’), sneakily self-mocking (‘Hey, I got a social disease!’) and ferociously, aggressively emotional: the operatic finale is a masterclass in three-hanky audience manipulation. Also, the film contains perhaps the single best song ever written for the musical theatre: ‘Somewhere’, the ultimate romantic ballad for trapped and dreaming lovers. TH

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48

Ghost (1990)

Director: Jerry Zucker

Cast: Demi Moore, Patrick Swayze

Best quote: 'I love you. I really love you.' 'Ditto.'

Defining moment: Swayze and Moore send shares in pottery classes skywards.

Care for a little necrophilia?
Screenwriter Bruce Joel Rubin was initially dismayed to hear that producers planned to hand his heartbreaking supernatural romance over to ‘Airplane!’ director Jerry Zucker (‘I thought with this director that they were going to turn “Ghost” into some kind of comedy and it’d be horrible’), but in fact the move led to a skilfully put-together mixture of tearjerker and madcap farce, enabling Whoopi Goldberg to turn in an Oscar-winning Best Supporting Actress performance for her role as con artist/medium Oda Mae Brown.

Counting sexy pottery as a given, ‘Ghost’ is also romantically notable for the queer frisson of the scene where Sam's spirit possesses Oda Mae to share one final dance with Demi Moore's grieving Molly. CB

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47

Lost in Translation (2003)

Director: Sofia Coppola

Cast: Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson

Best quote: 'Can you keep a secret? I’m trying to organise a prison break. I’m looking for, like, an accomplice.'

Defining moment: Crooning Roxy’s ‘More Than This’ in a Tokyo karaoke bar.

Platonic bomb
Strangely polarising for such a wistful and modest little movie, some people struggle to see past the privilege that backgrounds Sofia Coppola’s story about the unique connection that develops between fading movie star Bob (Bill Murray, in his best and reportedly favourite role) and Charlotte, the married twentysomething he meets in the bar of a fancy Tokyo hotel.

The rest of us get to enjoy one of the most perfect films ever made about the indefinable bonds that can form between people who happen to find each other at just the right moment, with Coppola’s hazy direction focusing on the infinite meanings that live between words. We may never know what Bob whispers to Charlotte in the film’s final scene, but it’s a safe bet that neither one of them will ever forget. DE

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46

Pretty Woman (1990)

Director: Garry Marshall

Cast: Richard Gere, Julia Roberts

Best quote: 'You and I are such similar creatures Vivian. We both screw people for money.'

Defining moment: Gere and Roberts take a private jet from LA to San Francisco for a date at the opera.

Date with destiny
Roberts offered a very different shot in the arm to prostitutes everywhere with this ludicrous but undeniably charming romantic fantasy about a Hollywood streetwalker who falls for a stinking rich businessman (Gere) after he hires her for a week to be his companion at dinners and evening engagements, in between his epic workload of barking at lawyers.

Sure, the idea of a prostitute who’s as beautiful, clean, happy and glamorous as Roberts is absurd, but then Gere’s portrait of the archetypal 1980s business shark with a core of ice yearning to be melted is just as caricatured as her tart with a heart.

‘Pretty Woman’ is slushy, cheesy and so smoothly crafted that it succeeds as the very definition of romantic escapism. Roberts also has some winning comic moments, including her curtain-call quip to an elderly lady at the opera: ‘It was so good I almost pee’d my pants.’ DC

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45

Weekend (2011)

Director: Andrew Haigh

Cast: Chris New, Tom Cullen

Best quote: 'I couldn't be more proud of you than if you were the first man on the moon.'

Defining moment: When Glen interviews Russell on tape for an art project the morning after the night before.

Boy meets boy
This British film, shot on a shoestring, captures in a lively and fresh style the first throes of attraction, passion and maybe even love between two men, Glen (New) and Russell (Cullen), who meet one night in a bar and spend a couple of days and nights together. They talk, they have sex, they size each other up. Glen is open and chatty, while Russell is more guarded and defensive.

Haigh’s film is marked by an immediacy and a sense of tentative exploration that’s rare in depictions of couplings, and by a keen awareness that we project one image on the world and hold another back for ourselves. Not a great deal happens in terms of big events, but the film’s honesty and realism mean that it’s a little film with a lot to say. DC

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44

Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Director: Howard Hawks

Cast: Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn

Best quote: 'When a man is wrestling a leopard in the middle of a pond, he's in no position to run.'

Defining moment: The prison scene: enter Swingin’ Door Susie and Jerry the Nipper.

Romance, red in tooth and claw
Like its bumbling protagonist, Hawks’ archetypal screwball classic went from disaster to darling. The tale of a paleontologist (Grant), a society dame (Hepburn), a snappy terrier and a stray Brazilian leopard, ‘Bringing Up Baby’ ran seriously over budget and over schedule thanks to animal misbehaviour coupled with Grant and Hepburn’s inability to stop making each other laugh during takes.

It flopped disastrously on first release: Hawks’ contract with producers RKO was cut short and Hepburn was labeled ‘box office poison’ by a top exec. Two decades later, following a series of successful TV showings, the film was rightly recognised as the pinnacle of the screwball art: no film was ever so fast, so witty and so gorgeously irrational. TH

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43

Dirty Dancing (1987)

Director: Emile Ardolino

Cast: Patrick Swayze, Jennifer Grey

Best quote: 'Come on, ladies. God wouldn't have given you maracas if He didn't want you to shake 'em.'

Defining moment: Nobody puts Baby in a corner. When even Ryan Gosling has scored using your defining moment (in ‘Crazy, Stupid, Love’), you know it’s a good ’un.

Sir Patrick of Swayz
She dreamt of studying the economics of underdeveloped countries and volunteering for the Peace Corps. He just wanted to dance the night away. Until one day she manhandles some watermelons into his backstage area (not a metaphor), and falls in love at first sight.

Filmed at the peak of Patrick Swayze’s handsomeness, with a healthy dollop of none-more-’80s style and a cracking jukebox full of irresistibly catchy numbers, a thousand clip shows would have us remember ‘Dirty Dancing’ as something of a minor classic. And, for once, they would be right on the money. CB

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42

Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

Director: Wes Anderson

Cast: Jared Gilman, Kara Hayward, Bruce Willis, Bill Murray

Best quote: 'It's possible I may wet the bed, by the way.'

Defining moment: Sam and Suzy kiss an awkward kiss on the beach.

Children, behave
Romance isn't the first thing you expect from a Wes Anderson film, but in this delightful 1960s-set tale, the American auteur employs all his usual tricks – hip soundtrack, arch dialogue, super-careful production design – in the service of a story about the chaos and madness of young love.

Sam and Suzy are 12-year-olds on the run. Suzy is precocious and independent; Sam is nerdy and serious. They don't get very far, but a mile's a long way when you're 12, and danger is never far away. What's lovely is how seriously Anderson takes Sam and Suzy's adventure, while also laying on the humour and the irony. By the time the pair steal a smooch on a deserted beach, we're totally smitten. DC

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41

The Shop Around the Corner (1940)

Director: Ernst Lubitsch

Cast: Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart

Best quote: 'People seldom go to the trouble of scratching the surface of things to find the inner truth.'

Defining moment: Kralik (Stewart) brags to his hated colleague Miss Novak (Sullavan) about his upcoming date with ‘the most wonderful girl in the world’ – unaware that they are one and the same.

Over the counter
You can’t blame a great film for the indignities it spawned. ‘The Shop Around the Corner’ was the inspiration behind both ‘Are You Being Served?’ and gooey romcom ‘You’ve Got Mail’, but that doesn’t dim the brilliance of Lubitsch’s original.

We tend to think of pre-war Hollywood as being a fairly insular, conservative sort of place. But here’s a mainstream comedy set in Hungary (already an Axis collaborator by the time the film was shot), pushing the idea that those benighted Europeans – a world away from middle America – had ordinary lives, loves and values of their own. The performances are perfect, the hate-to-love plotline painstakingly constructed, and the dialogue sparkles like diamonds. TH

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See numbers 40-31

The 100 best romantic movies: 40-31

40

Titanic (1997)

Director: James Cameron

Cast: Kate Winslet, Leonardo DiCaprio

Best quote: 'Where to, Miss?' 'To the stars!'

Defining moment: Oh, go on then: the prow scene, where Leo claims to be the king of the world, and just for a moment we all believe him.

My heart will go on… and on… and on…
Few films inspire as much passion as James Cameron’s epic would-be folly. Following a troubled production, when the film finally splashed into cinemas, it became the biggest money-spinner of all time, provoking an ocean of housewives’ tears and one of the biggest Oscar hauls in history. Then the backlash hit, like an iceberg in Arctic waters: wait a second, people pointed out, the dialogue’s godawful, the depiction of social class is farcical, and the romance is just join-the-dots Mills and Boon nonsense.

So which is true? Well, both, to be fair. ‘Titanic’ is an incredibly involving experience, especially once the ship hits the berg and all hell breaks loose. Sure, it’s about as intellectually valid as a Jilly Cooper novel, but if you’re looking for a high-concept crowd-pleaser with its heart firmly on its sleeve, they don’t come much bigger, sillier or more enjoyable. TH

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39

The Last of the Mohicans (1992)

Director: Michael Mann

Cast: Daniel Day-Lewis, Madeleine Stowe

Best quote: 'Stay alive. No matter how long it takes, no matter how far, I will find you.'

Defining moment: Declaring undying love against a thundering waterfall.

Hip to be squaw
It’s partly about the hair – wild, untamed, immaculately salon-shiny despite many months in the wilderness. It’s partly about the running – manly men springing through the forest like deer, hatchets raised as they swoop down on their unsuspecting prey. And it’s partly about the guns – muskets, rifles, bayonets, all longer than a man’s arm, billowing smoke and sending another Indian brave to his untimely death.

But in Michael Mann’s full-throated adaptation of James Fenimore Cooper’s timeless adventure story, it’s mainly about the romance. Love comes in many forms here: shy, gushing, bloody, brotherly, doomed and feisty. And as Daniel Day-Lewis stands beneath that waterfall, bellowing his heart out and promising to track his beloved wherever the fates may take her, you’d need to have a hard heart not to be swept away completely. TH

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38

Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961)

Director: Blake Edwards

Cast: Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard

Best quote: 'Oh, golly gee damn!'

Defining moment: Holly Golightly sings ‘Moon River’ at the windows of her NYC apartment.

The original pretty woman
It’s the role that Audrey Hepburn will forever be remembered for: the beautiful, bolshy city girl with a brittle edge in this handsome, well-dressed adaptation of Truman Capote’s novella. Of course, Edwards’ film deftly sidestepped the sadder, seedier aspects of Holly Golightly’s life in the book – working as a high-society escort in early 1960s Manhattan. Instead, the film prefers to indulge the on-off, will-they-won’t-they aspect of her relationship with Paul (Peppard), her dapper neighbour.

To be frank, the spark between Hepburn and Peppard is lacking, and there’s little about ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’ that truly sets the heart ablaze. What’s fun, though, is the giddiness of Holly’s life and her dashes about town with Paul (to a strip club, a stuffy library and, of course, the famous jewellery store). What the film most bequeaths us is the romantic ideal of the witty, couture-clad, urbane, dark-haired beauty: the Hepburn that launched a thousand Audreys. DC

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37

Breathless (1960)

Director: Jean-Luc Godard

Cast: Jean-Paul Belmondo, Jean Seberg

Best quote: 'Informers inform, burglars burgle, murderers murder, lovers love.'

Defining moment: The lovers’ ambiguous parting words in the final scene. What do they mean?

A girl and a gun
As love stories go, 'Breathless' ('À Bout de Souffle') is not one for the ages. Jean-Paul Belmondo, playing a Parisian wideboy on the run after shooting a cop, and Jean Seberg as the hipster American newspaper girl who unwittingly shelters him, look impossibly beautiful together, smoking Lucky Strikes and debating existentialist theory in bed. But they seem entirely too cool to be in love.

Yet Godard’s groundbreaking New Wave take on the Hollywood B-movie is romantic almost in spite of itself. Its still-youthful jazz rhythms, its fresh exploration of Paris at its most invitingly chic and its sexy bedroom talk are what so many of us want romance to look and feel like. So we’re more than happy to indulge it, like the cinematic equivalent of a dirty weekend. GL

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36

All That Heaven Allows (1955)

Director: Douglas Sirk

Cast: Jane Wyman, Rock Hudson

Best quote: 'The only Kirby I know is the old gardener, and the last I heard, he was dead!'

Defining moment: The newly-entangled Cary and Ron turn up at a cocktail party full of nosy neighbourhood types.

Let them all talk
The swooning Technicolor palette, the pristine costumes and the fairly standard odd-couple romance between a rich widow, Cary (Wyman), and a Thoreau-reading gardener, Ron (Hudson), only serve to make the social commentary in Sirk’s film all the more powerful.

‘All That Heaven Allows’ is a blistering exposé of how society’s attitudes serve to throw cold water on passion and keep our purer romantic instincts in check. Scenes of folk gossiping behind the couple’s backs or predatory men leaping on Cary are shocking and only make us root even more for Cary and Ron’s relationship (even if the film lacks a genuine spark between the pair).

The film proved an inspiration for two later inquiring romances, Fassbinder’s ‘Fear Eats the Soul’ and Todd Haynes’s ‘Far From Heaven’, both of which took Sirk’s interest in sexual repression and love-across-the-divide in very different directions. DC

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35

Fear Eats the Soul (1974)

Director: Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Cast: Brigitte Mira, El Hedi ben Salem

Best quote: 'We'll be rich, Ali. And we'll buy ourselves a little piece of heaven.'

Defining moment: The scene where Emmi reveals her relationship to her family is a masterclass in awkwardness and character tension.

Achtung, baby
Many of cinema’s most exciting moments come about as a result of unlikely juxtapositions. Who would’ve thought that taking the structure and form of 1950s Hollywood ‘womens’ pictures’ and transplanting them to grim, urban 1970s Germany would result in one of the sweetest, most challenging and emotive romantic films ever made?

Mira plays Emmi, the solitary, spreading middle-aged cleaner who starts an affair with a Moroccan ‘gastarbeiter’ two decades her junior. What’s remarkable about Fassbinder’s film is that he takes these two diametric characters and makes their love completely convincing – not for a second do we wonder why the strapping Ali cares so much for crumbling Emmi, or vice versa. TH

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34

Blue Valentine (2010)

Director: Derek Cianfrance

Cast: Ryan Gosling, Michelle Williams

Best quote: 'In my experience, the prettier a girl is, the more nuts she is, which makes you insane.'

Defining moment: When Dean threatens to throw himself from a New York bridge if Cindy won't tell him what's up.

In sickness and in health
The rough follows the smooth in this bittersweet US indie which flits back and forth from the dying embers of a five-year marriage to the first throes of heady passion. Cindy and Dean are tired, frustrated young parents, but not long ago they were dancing on the streets. Cianfrance gives us a frank portrait of where love can head if there are problems from the start.

It's a difficult and sad watch, but an invigorating one as we run along with the energy of Cindy and Dean's first meetings and then scratch our heads at where it all went wrong. What makes 'Blue Valentine' a smart summary of a faltering romance are the specifics of Dean and Cindy's problems: there's no cynical suggestion that all or most relationships head south with time. Instead, Cianfrance makes subtle suggestions as to why this one might not last the distance. DC

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33

Vertigo (1958)

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Cast: Kim Novak, James Stewart

Best quote: 'Only one is a wanderer; two together are always going somewhere.'

Defining moment: Judy finally gets the hair right and ‘Madeleine’ lives once more.

My fair lady
In 2012, this Alfred Hitchcock film was voted the best movie ever made in Sight & Sound magazine’s respected once-in-a-decade poll (knocking ‘Citizen Kane’ off the top slot). James Stewart plays Scottie, a former police detective who is hired by a businessman to track his supposedly wayward wife through the streets of San Francisco. While on the job, Scottie believes that he witnesses the woman’s suicide, sending his fragile mental state into freefall.

This isn’t the ideal film to choose if you’re after simple, uncomplicated romance. ‘Vertigo’ couldn’t be more complex and cunning, but it’s also brilliantly strange and compelling in what it has to say about love and obsession. It operates on a deeply psychological level: those San Francisco landmarks, especially the Golden Gate Bridge, look like nothing less than the byways and highways of a mind pushed to breaking point by the promise – or threat – of romance. DC

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32

The English Patient (1996)

Director: Anthony Minghella

Cast: Ralph Fiennes, Juliette Binoche, Kristin Scott Thomas

Best quote: 'Swoon, I'll catch you.'

Defining moment: The last kiss in the firelit Saharan cave, just after the Count tells the doomed Katherine he’ll never leave her – a promise they both know he can’t keep.

Desert song
Thanks to ‘Seinfeld’, Anthony Minghella’s Oscar-guzzling, two-planed love story became the butt of many a joke with harder-hearted viewers. But the film’s lingering impression in the public imagination as a kind of saturated desert swoon does a disservice to its subdued yet shimmering sense of melancholy.

For all its sweeping sequences of radiantly lit passion, this adaptation of Michael Ondaatje’s Booker Prize-winning novel is more a story of love’s withered aftermath, as the disfigured Count de Almasy, dying in an Italian monastery at the end of WWII, is ironically sustained by memories of a lethal liaison with patrician married beauty Katherine. For a supposed romantic throwback, it’s impressively bleak, yet tinged with rapture – not least in the matchless beauty of its three leads. GL

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31

Amour (2012)

Director: Michael Haneke

Cast: Emmanuelle Riva, Jean-Louis Trintignant

Best quote: 'Please never take me back to the hospital… Promise… Promise me.'

Defining moment: When Anne suddenly freezes in the kitchen one morning.

Looks like we made it to the end
‘What will survive of us is love,’ wrote Philip Larkin, a poet equally known for being a cuddly old romantic as Michael Haneke, the writer and director of ‘Amour’. In his Paris-set film, Haneke examines what love means when we’re reaching the end of our lives. Haneke gives us Georges (Trintignant) and Anne (Riva), a couple in their eighties who struggle to cope when Anne falls ill from a stroke.

‘Amour’ isn’t romantic in any traditional sense of the word, but it’s steeped in ideas about living life as a couple. It’s deeply thoughtful – and thought-provoking – in relation to what it really, properly means to be with someone all your life, to the end of your life. It’s heartbreaking and totally free of false sentiment. DC

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See numbers 30-21

The 100 best romantic movies: 30-21

30

The African Queen (1951)

Director: John Huston

Cast: Katharine Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart

Best quote: 'What a time we had, Rosie. What a time we had.'

Defining moment: After surviving the rapids, one of the great ‘celebratory hug gets serious’ moments in cinema.

Messing about on the river
We tend to think of movies about old folks shacking up as being a modern phenomenon, as producers pursue the newfangled ‘grey pound’. But it’s really nothing new: in fact, when the original script for ‘The African Queen’ was presented to the censors, the busybodies were shocked at the idea of two unmarried persons enjoying a late-in-life romance in the sweaty confines of a rickety old tramp steamer.

‘The African Queen’ is one of the great films about delayed self-discovery: brittle spinster Hepburn’s realisation of her love for crusty, good-hearted layabout Bogart isn’t just believable, it feels completely necessary. Wise, warm, witty, and with just the hint of a sly, subversive twinkle in its eye, ‘The African Queen’ is old-school Hollywood at its absolute finest. TH

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29

Before Sunset (2004)

Director: Richard Linklater

Cast: Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke

Best quote: 'You can never replace anyone because everyone is made up of such beautiful specific details.'

Defining moment: Celine’s zero hour Nina Simone impression.

First world problems
These days, director Richard Linklater is known as a master of the long game, his 12-years-in-the-making ‘Boyhood’ (2014) reaping acclaim from all quarters. But the first taste of Linklater’s easygoing maturity came a decade earlier with this sequel to ‘Before Sunrise’, one that deepened college-age lusts into regret, nostalgia and a hopeful rebirth.

Again, we’re strolling with Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Céline (Julie Delpy), this time through a pink-hued Paris during the magic hour. Nine years later, they pick up their banter with ease, and even though life’s choices have drawn them in separate directions, the movie throbs with potential for romance. By the time we’re back in Céline’s apartment – Nina Simone cooing on the stereo – the outcome is all but inevitable. JR

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28

William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet (1996)

Director: Baz Luhrmann

Cast: Leonardo DiCaprio, Claire Danes

Best quote: 'A plague on both your houses! They have made worms’ meat of me.'

Defining moment: DiCaprio and Danes making loved-up eyes at each other through the glass and water of a fish tank.

From the Globe to the ghetto
Baz Luhrmann had some cast-iron source material to work with in the form of Shakespeare’s story – but the Australian writer-director took the playwright’s romantic tragedy to another place entirely with this ultra-modern reworking. At the same, he never lost sight of the essence of Shakespeare’s tale of two young lovers doomed from the first time they lay eyes on each other.

The moment that Romeo (DiCaprio, so young!) and Juliet (Danes, so young too!) meet at a wild fancy-dress party is pure bliss to watch, just as Luhrmann’s staging of the final death scene is almost impossible to bear. There are guns, hip-hop, open-topped cars and characters so larger-than-life that the whole thing now, in retrospect, feels like Tarantino directing a season-finale episode of ‘Dynasty’. It’s mad, musical and immensely moving. DC

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27

The Bridges of Madison County (1995)

Director: Clint Eastwood

Cast: Meryl Streep, Clint Eastwood, Annie Corley

Best quote: 'Do you want more eggs or should we just fuck on the linoleum one last time?'

Defining moment: Meryl and Clint in her kitchen, slow-dancing to the honeyed sounds of jazz crooner Johnny Hartman.

Four days in paradise
This classy adaptation of Robert James Waller’s bestseller is ‘Brief Encounter’ in another time and another place. It’s mid-‘60s Iowa and Italian housewife Streep, long wedded to a local farmer, starts thinking about the life she could have had when dashing National Geographic photographer Clint turns up to shoot the famed covered bridges nearby.

While the latterday framing device is somewhat clunky, the central middle-aged romance is exquisitely inscribed through tender looks, stolen moments, and much sultry jazz on the radio, building to a wrenchingly bittersweet conclusion that love’s liberating affirmation doesn’t always arrive when circumstances allow it to flourish. ‘This kind of certainty comes but once in a lifetime’ is the key line, and we believe it. Sigh. TJ

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26

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964)

Director: Jacques Demy

Cast: Catherine Deneuve, Nino Castelnuovo

Best quote: 'People only die of love in the movies.'

Defining moment: A sad, bittersweet meeting in the snow, two lovers seeing each other for the first time in years.

All things bright and beautiful
You'd need to have a sliver of ice lodged in your heart not to be moved by ‘The Umbrellas of Cherbourg’ – a musical that has even hardened musical-haters melting into puddles. Not that it’s a musical in the belt-‘em-out tradition. Instead, every word is sung rather than spoken as 17-year-old Geneviève (Deneuve) falls sweetly and madly in love with car mechanic Guy (Castelnuovo).

‘Umbrellas’ is one of the most ravishing films ever made, wrapped in candyfloss colours to match the blush of first love. When Guy is drafted to fight in Algeria, Geneviève is certain she will die of grief. But time passes and Geneviève doesn’t die. Love fades. And that’s the bittersweet message inside this exquisitely sugar coated pill. CC

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25

When Harry Met Sally... (1989)

Director: Rob Reiner

Cast: Meg Ryan, Billy Crystal, Carrie Fisher, Bruno Kirby

Best quote: 'When you realise you want to spend the rest of your life with somebody, you want the rest of your life to start as soon as possible.'

Defining moment: Too many to mention, but the orgasm scene in the diner has become something of a classic.

Friends with hissy fits
In 2012, the world lost a legend. True, Nora Ephron’s work may have declined over the years, but her screenplay for ‘When Harry Met Sally...’ remains a masterpiece of romcom construction. Embracing, upending and inventing clichés left and right, crammed with one-liners, goofy asides and enough valid life lessons to rival the scriptures, it’s one of the few movie scripts that works just as well on the page as it does on the screen.

And pretty much everything else about the film is perfect, too, from Crystal and Ryan’s just-this-side-of-smug central couple to Fisher and Kirby as the petri-dish of marital dysfunction, from Harry Connick Jr’s just-the-other-side-of-smug crooning to the gorgeous photography of New York through the changing seasons. Bliss. TH

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24

Before Sunrise (1995)

Director: Richard Linklater

Cast: Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke

Best quote: 'Isn't everything we do in life a way to be loved a little more?'

Defining moment: It happens off-screen – Linklater purposely doesn’t show us the did-they-or-didn’t-they sexual encounter.

This means something to me
Proof that you don’t need a plot to fall in love, ‘Before Sunrise’ sees strangers on a train Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) meet-cute, disembark in Vienna, and dance a verbal tango into the night as the deadline of Jesse’s flight home looms.

You’d say that Delpy and Hawke have never been better were it not for the 2004 sequel ‘Before Sunset’, which shows us what happens next, and the 2013 instalment ‘Before Midnight’, which revisits the pair as middle age encroaches. A classy antidote to the notion that passion is purely physical, it’s the sporadically articulate philosophising and spiky gender-focused sparring that glues these two chatterboxes together. CB

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23

Up (2009)

Directors: Pete Docter, Bob Peterson

Cast: Ed Asner, Christopher Plummer

Best quote: 'You don't talk much. I like you!'

Defining moment: It’s all about the opening ten minutes, as we follow Carl and Ellie from childhood, through years of happy marriage ‘til death does them part.

The story of us
It’s remarkable that ‘Up’ has managed to sneak into the all-time top 25 romantic movies on the strength of a single 10-minute sequence, but it’s also testament to the extraordinary power this Pixar classic possesses.

It could’ve been so cutesy, so saccharine: a geeky kid with coke-bottle glasses dreams of being an explorer. The girl down the street wants the same thing. They grow up, fall in love, years pass, and we see the highs and lows of their life together: marriage, family, work, sickness, eventually death – a tapestry of honest emotion and meaning (and this, lest we forget, is a kids’ movie). The rest of ‘Up’ is ‘only’ hilarious and smart – but that opening is romance itself. TH

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22

Les Amants du Pont-Neuf (1991)

Director: Leos Carax

Cast: Juliette Binoche, Denis Lavant

Best quote: 'Paris can stay in bed.'

Defining moment: Alex and Michele dance along the bridge and waterski down the Seine to a backdrop of fireworks, Strauss and Iggy Pop during a Bastille Day celebration.

Paris when it sizzles
'Les Amants du Pont-Neuf' ('The Lovers on the Bridge') is Leos Carax's valentine to amour fou, Paris and his then-partner Juliette Binoche. And it's as rapturous and irrational as true love itself. Even the story of its production is something of a romantic tragedy: three years in the making and spiralling wildly over budget as Carax reconstructed Paris’s iconic Pont-Neuf Bridge in the south of France, it's the kind of grand artistic expression that must fail in order to succeed.

The simple love story – between two bohemian bums, one a derelict fire-eater and one a painter losing her eyesight – could be the stuff of silent melodrama, but Carax crams it with sound and colour to the point of delirious sensory ecstasy. GL

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21

Sunrise (1927)

Director: FW Murnau

Cast: George O’Brien, Janet Gaynor, Margaret Livingston

Best quote: 'This song of the Man and his Wife is of no place and every place; you might hear it anywhere, at any time.'

Defining moment: The couple’s first entry into the palace of delights is one of the most breathtaking moments in cinema.

Bright lights, big city
The shift in attitudes over time can make old movies unexpectedly shocking: we expect attitudes to race and gender roles to be different. But ‘Sunrise’ is a film in which a man attempts, fairly brutally, to strangle his wife – and yet by the end she (and we) have completely forgiven him.

Murnau’s masterpiece remains one of the most visually impressive films ever shot. And it’s in the disparity between that visual splendor and the intimacy of the central couple that the film’s power lies: as the quote above stresses, this is a film about anyone, and everyone. The sets and actions in the story may be big, Shakespearian, and occasionally unbelievable, but the emotions are close, human, familiar – ‘small’ in the best possible sense. TH

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See numbers 20-11

The 100 best romantic movies: 20-11

20

L’Atalante (1934)

Director: Jean Vigo

Cast: Dita Parlo, Jean Dasté, Michel Simon

Best quote: 'Paris, Paris! Oh, infamous, marvellous city!'

Defining moment: Jean leaps into the river and sees a vision of Juliette dancing in the water.

Life is but a dream
The French are famed as a romantic nation, but for those of us raised in a more reserved culture, their occasional tendency towards sweaty-crotched Gitane-smoke-in-the-face Gainsbourg-isms can seem a little, well, aggressive. Not so ‘L’Atalante’: this is a love story with the lightest touch, managing to be spiritual, sensual, serious and strange all at the same time.

Its 29-year-old director famously died before his debut feature was completed, but there’s more in this one film than most directors manage in a lifetime: more meaning, more emotion, more intensity. Perhaps it’s the out-of-the-past setting – a narrowboat plying the canals of rural France – or the weirdly disconnected central couple, or even the presence of Simon’s crusty, irascible Pere Jules. But something in Vigo’s film is not quite of this earth, and to watch it is the closest we may ever come to experiencing someone else’s dreams. TH

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19

Manhattan (1979)

Director: Woody Allen

Cast: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Mariel Hemingway, Meryl Streep

Best quote: 'You look so beautiful I can hardly keep my eyes on the meter.'

Defining moment: The stately black-and-white shots of the city cut to Gershwin’s ‘Rhapsody in Blue’.

A hell of a town
There’s so much in ‘Manhattan’ that’s familiar from Woody Allen’s other films, not least Woody himself playing a writer, Isaac, with endless hang-ups and a variety of women in his life. Here, those women are his 17-year-old girlfriend, Tracy (Hemingway); another love interest, Mary (Keaton); and his ex-wife, Jill (Streep).

For Woody, romance is fluid, complicated and alive. Yet by far the biggest romance in ‘Manhattan’ is Woody’s affair with the city itself. New York is often the backdrop for Woody’s films, but here a sense of place is more important than ever. There are those famous montages of the Manhattan skyline, lent a rare beauty by Gordon Willis’ loving black-and-white photography, and at the film’s climax we see Isaac running through the streets that have shaped him – and Woody Allen – and continue to do so. DC

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18

True Romance (1993)

Director: Tony Scott

Cast: Christian Slater, Patricia Arquette

Best quote: 'And all I could think was, you're so cool!'

Defining moment: To free his hooker wife from bondage, hero Clarence guns down her dreadful, dreadlocked pimp.

Geek cheek
We can’t help imagining that, when he came to write the script for ‘True Romance’, a before-he-was-famous Quentin Tarantino just jotted down his geekiest life goals and added dialogue. So the story follows a loveless comic-store clerk (Christian Slater) whose boss hires him the world’s foxiest and least experienced hooker (Patricia Arquette) for his birthday. She of course falls madly in love with him, he kills her pimp and they hit the road, bound for Hollywood and a major coke deal.

So yes, ‘True Romance’ is pretty shallow – but it’s also beautifully written, directed and acted, and simply impossible to dislike. The supporting cast is a dream – Dennis Hopper, Christopher Walken, Brad Pitt, Gary Oldman and James Gandolfini. But it’s Slater and Arquette who keep the film anchored, offering one of the most puppyishly lovable depictions of first love in modern cinema. TH

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17

La Belle et la Bête (1946)

Director: Jean Cocteau

Cast: Jean Marais, Josette Day

Best quote: 'Love can turn a man into a beast. But love can also make an ugly man handsome.'

Defining moment: As if in a dream, Belle bursts into Beast’s castle, walking on air.

Love is the beauty of the soul
The miracle of ‘La Belle et la Bête’ is how its tricks are still so magical – even in today’s age of CGI. Director Cocteau was a poet first and foremost and he brings to the traditional ‘Beauty and the Beast’ fairy tale pure movie poetry: Belle crying tears of diamonds; the castle lit by disembodied human arms holding up candelabras.

It’s unforgettable, although you might side with Greta Garbo on the ending. Legend has it that when she watched ‘La Belle’ with Cocteau she cried out at the end, as the curse is lifted and Beast is restored to his princely self: ‘Where is my beautiful Beast?’ Garbo, like Belle, had fallen for the matinee idol Beast – and the smarmy-looking prince left in his place doesn’t quite cut it. CC

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16

Wild at Heart (1990)

Director: David Lynch

Cast: Nicolas Cage, Laura Dern

Best quote: 'The way your head works is God's own private mystery.'

Defining moment: After dancing like a maniac to speed-metal combo Powermad, Sailor Ripley busts into a swoonsome version of Elvis’s ‘Love Me’.

American dream
No one does romance quite like David Lynch: just think of Sandy and the robins in ‘Blue Velvet’, or Henry and the radiator lady in ‘Eraserhead’. There are those who write him off as an ironist, but this uniquely intense and unabashed worship of love as an otherworldly, all-consuming and dangerous state of higher consciousness is anything but detached.

Lynch loves love, and he loves lovers, none more so than Sailor and Lula, the star-crossed, whisky-fuelled, sex-crazed, emotionally scarred couple that are the wild heart of his madcap kaleidoscopic road movie. This is all-American love reimagined as a carnival show: brutal and beautiful and completely barmy. TH

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15

Badlands (1973)

Director: Terrence Malick

Cast: Martin Sheen, Sissy Spacek

Best quote: 'Little did I realise that what began in the alleys and backways of this quiet town would end in the Badlands of Montana.'

Defining moment: Kit sees Holly ‘standin' on her front lawn, just a-twirling her baton’, as Bruce Springsteen put it in the ‘Badlands’-inspired song, ‘Nebraska’.

There’s a killer on the road
Here’s where the brilliant career of Terrence Malick begins – and even with such epics as ‘The Thin Red Line’ and ‘The Tree of Life’ on the horizon, many still hold the director’s first film as his most perfect. Loosely based on a real-life Texas crime spree perpetrated by young lovers, the movie features a smouldering Martin Sheen as frustrated greaser Kit, and Sissy Spacek as his teenage girlfriend Holly.

Malick swaddles their exploits in a sheen of soft-focus sunsets and the twinkling music of Carl Orff, but the most romantic element of ‘Badlands’ is Spacek’s narration. It’s the naïve and often heartbreaking account of a lonely girl getting a taste of adulthood, sex and the rush of being bad (and in love). She’s wised up by film’s end, yet for most of the journey, we’re seduced alongside her. JR

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14

Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948)

Director: Max Ophüls

Cast: Joan Fontaine, Louis Jourdan

Best quote: 'If only you could have shared those moments, if only you could have recognised what was always yours, could have found what was never lost. If only...'

Defining moment: The greatest first-date setting of all time – an old fairground ride where scenes from around the globe roll past the windows of a wooden train.

Lonely are the brave
‘By the time you read this letter I may be dead.’ With these words a woman who has spent her life hopelessly devoted to a man who doesn’t know she exists begins her letter to him. Quite simply, ‘Letter from an Unknown Woman’ will leave your heart in pieces on the floor.

Set in turn-of-the-century Vienna but shot in 1948 Hollywood by Max Ophüls with a gorgeous, swooning camera, Joan Fontaine stars as Lisa. Over decades Lisa has had three brief meetings with womanising concert pianist Stefan (Louis Jourdan) – who fails to recognise her every time. Her aching letter gives the film its voiceover as she tells the story of her unrequited, borderline masochistic love: ‘My life can be measured in the moments I have had with you.’ A heartbreaking masterpiece. CC

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13

I Know Where I'm Going! (1945)

Directors: Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger

Cast: Wendy Hillier, Roger Livesey

Best quote: 'Not poor, they just haven't got money.'

Defining moment: Joan tries to cross to the island and gets caught in a storm near a whirlpool.

The high road to romance
And she does know exactly where she’s going. She is Joan Webster (Wendy Hiller), a thoroughly modern independent woman in 1940s wartime London. Joan has bagged a big catch and is engaged to an industrial magnate twice her age. The wedding is set to take place on his private island in the Hebrides and nothing is going to stop her; nothing except the Scottish weather and perhaps a dashing naval officer (Roger Livesey), with whom Joan becomes stranded on the Isle of Mull during a storm.

‘I Know Where I’m Going!’ beautifully combines romance and comedy. And this is a romantic movie with friends in high places. Here’s Martin Scorsese: ‘I reached the point of thinking there were no more masterpieces to discover, until I saw “I Know Where I’m Going!”.’ CC

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12

Gone with the Wind (1939)

Director: Victor Fleming

Cast: Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable

Best quote: 'Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn.'

Defining moment: Rhett Butler’s scandalous proposal – Scarlett is in mourning, her husband not yet cold in his grave.

Whistlin’ Dixie
Why should we still give a damn? Because after more than 70 years, ‘Gone with the Wind’ still does it bigger and better. At nearly four hours long it’s the ultimate rainy-day-in-bed-with-the-flu movie and features maybe the greatest ever screen lovers. Every actress in Hollywood was screen-tested or considered for the role of spoiled Southern belle Scarlett O’Hara. In the end, it went to the hardly-known British actress Leigh, with Gable cast as infamous ladies’ man Rhett Butler.

Scarlett knows exactly what kind of man Rhett is the moment she meets him – the kind of who has a pretty good idea what a girl looks like in her petticoats. Years later, after toughing out the Civil War, Scarlett notches him up (or is it vice versa?) as husband number three. And their stormy marriage gives us one of cinema’s greatest unanswered questions. Can she win him back? Is tomorrow another day? CC

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11

WALL-E (2008)

Director: Andrew Stanton

Cast: Ben Burtt, Elissa Knight, Jeff Garlin

Best quote: 'Beep, beep, beep…'

Defining moment: When WALL-E falls in love with Eve, inspired by watching ‘Hello, Dolly!’

Leaves a metallic taste in the mouth
Can a near-silent portrait of a love between two robots, WALL-E and Eve, really be that romantic? Well, Pixar found a way with this daring story of a lonely robot on Earth in 2700, a time when the planet has been abandoned by life and WALL-E has only piles of junk and a copy of Gene Kelly’s ‘Hello, Dolly!’ for company. WALL-E is a creaky, awkward creature and when the more sleek, iPod-like Eve turns up in his life, he naturally falls head over heels for her.

The film’s great achievement (if we forget its more boisterous and less successful second half) is that its silence and calm draw us in and allows us to appreciate small gestures and the little things in life. It’s the most touching robot-on-robot relationship since the bickering bromance between C3PO and R2D2 in ‘Star Wars’. DC

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See the top ten

The 100 best romantic movies: top ten

10

Punch-Drunk Love (2002)

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson

Cast: Adam Sandler, Emily Watson

Best quote: 'I have a love in my life. It makes me stronger than anything you can imagine.'

Defining moment: When Barry tells Lena that he wants to smash her face with a sledgehammer – in the most charming way imaginable…

Love is strange
Remember that brief, golden period in the early 2000s when you could openly admit to your friends and family that you were looking forward to the new Adam Sandler movie? A time before ‘Grown Ups 2’ and ‘Blended’, when this still-promising comedy talent actually took risks with his career? It’s impossible to imagine the Sandler of today agreeing to ‘Punch-Drunk Love’ – then again, it’s pretty hard to imagine that he knew what he was getting himself into.

Paul Thomas Anderson’s film is without doubt the oddest romcom of all time, suspended in a hinterland between old-fashioned screwball antics, quirky indie romance and outright arthouse obliqueness. The tone is impossible to pin down, veering from rage to romance to ice-cold stillness. But somehow it works: the glassy LA photography is eye-ravishingly cool, the performances are just this side of too-far-out, and the love affair between Sandler and Emily Watson is simply, truly perfect. TH


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9

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Director: Michel Gondry

Cast: Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet

Best quote: 'I've never felt that before. I'm just exactly where I want to be.'

Defining moment: That final conversation in the hallway, in which the repetition of the simple word ‘okay’ means so much more than just ‘I love you’.

Brainwashing for beginners
You might see this extraordinary film, a joint career peak for Michel Gondry, writer Charlie Kaufman and its improbably but perfectly matched leads, described in generic DVD catalogues as a romantic comedy. It’s a term that seems wholly unequal to its dizzying conceptual acrobatics, not to mention the profound sadness in its absurdist excavation of post-romantic trauma.

But a rich, tragedy-tinged comedy it is: Kaufman has essentially given a scruffy sci-fi makeover to a ‘Philadelphia Story’-style farce of second chances and destiny denied, without letting the film’s beating screwball heart get overly chilled by its wintry New York cool. No longer just the hipster’s choice, it’s become the go-to love story for an entire generation of, to paraphrase Kate Winslet’s Clementine, fucked-up girls – and guys – looking for their own peace of mind. GL

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8

A Matter of Life and Death (1946)

Directors: Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger

Cast: Kim Hunter, David Niven, Roger Livesey

Best quote: 'Nothing is stronger than the law in the Universe, but on Earth nothing is stronger than love.'

Defining moment: The beginning. David Niven is a British wartime pilot, crashing down to earth; Kim Hunter is an American radio operator, falling in love with his voice in his final seconds.

All’s fair in love and war
Trust Powell and Pressburger to find a way of exploring love that is teasing, heartfelt and totally imaginative – while also being timely for an audience recovering from six years of war, separation and strain. When Niven’s pilot plunges to the ground, we enter two worlds: one of them celestial (in monochrome) and one of them real (in colour), although the distinction is in fact much more playful.

After narrowly cheating death (or did he?), will Niven remain on Earth with his new love, Hunter? Or must he succumb to fate? In the end, Powell and Pressburger’s idea is age-old and simple: love conquers all. But they explain this with the bonkers-brilliant concept of putting this idea on trial in no less than a heavenly court. The climax couldn’t be more stirring. DC

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7

The Apartment (1960)

Director: Billy Wilder

Cast: Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine

Best quote: 'That's the way it crumbles... cookie-wise.'

Defining moment: C.C. Baxter decides to take the advice of his doctor and become a mensch.

When life gives you Lemmon...
Billy Wilder’s ‘The Apartment’ takes the long and winding route to true romance. The premise is anything but romantic: CC Baxter (Jack Lemmon) is a Manhattan office drone whose way to the heart of his bosses – and promotion – is to loan out his bachelor pad to married men having affairs or one-night-stands. Baxter’s neighbours are increasingly fed up with his apparent philandering, but the sad reality is that the four walls of his apartment witness no romance at all when it comes to their actual tenant.

When he starts a flirtation with Fran (Shirley MacLaine), a beautiful lift attendant who works in his faceless modern office block, little does Baxter know that she is actually caught up in an unhappy affair with his boss (Fred MacMurray). Wilder is unafraid to go down some dark alleys in ‘The Apartment’: there’s a strong streak of cynicism relating to modern office politics and even a suicide attempt. But that only makes the final resolution all the more rewarding and hard-won. DC

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6

Brokeback Mountain (2005)

Director: Ang Lee

Cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Heath Ledger, Michelle Williams, Anne Hathaway

Best quote: 'I wish I knew how to quit you.'

Defining moment: When Jack and Ennis make love in a tent.

A camp romance
Lee’s adaptation of E Annie Proulx's short story is a desperately sad account of gay love beaten into submission by society’s attitudes and conventions. Jack (Gyllenhaal) and Ennis (Ledger) are two ranch hands in early 1960s Wyoming who spend one glorious summer out in the wilderness falling in love and sleeping with each other.

It’s a golden age – a long-lost arcadia – that can never be recovered by this unlikely romantic pair as the years go by and Jack and Ennis live separate lives (though they occasionally meet up for secretive fishing trips to rekindle their passion). As they age, Jack is more successful at holding down an everyday life with a job and family, but Ennis seriously struggles, and his story is all the more tragic for it. It’s a brilliantly acted film, and Lee finds time to celebrate and explore the love at the core of his story as well as creating space to mourn its fallout. DC

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5

Harold and Maude (1971)

Director: Hal Ashby

Cast: Ruth Gordon, Bud Cort

Best quote: 'Oh, Harold, that's wonderful. Go and love some more.'

Defining moment: In a field of daisies overlooking a vast military cemetery, Maude explains her philosophy of life.

Age shall not wither them
The hippy era was full of movies that attempted to confront square society, to shock viewers into some undefined form of action. How many of them are still effective today? But ‘Harold and Maude’, the gentle flipside of the revolutionary dream, is every bit as charming, affecting and surprising as it must have been on its first release.

Partly this is because none of its themes have gone out of date: we still live in a world of empty privilege and rigid hierarchy, petty authority and relentless conformism. So the idea of a teenage boy (Cort) shacking up with a batty old woman (Gordon) is still a challenge to social norms. Best of all, ‘Harold and Maude’ is also still devastatingly romantic: a story of soulmates, in the most literal sense. TH

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4

Annie Hall (1977)

Director: Woody Allen

Cast: Diane Keaton, Woody Allen

Best quote: 'Don’t knock masturbation. It’s sex with someone I love.'

Defining moment: Call the lobster squad! Dinner has escaped.

Analyse this
Irrational, crazy and absurd, ‘Annie Hall’ gives us love in its all its messy glory. It’s the anatomy of break-up. ‘Where did it all go wrong?’ asks Woody Allen’s neurotic comedian Alvy Singer after his split from scatterbrain singer Annie (Diane Keaton, enjoying a killer fashion moment in boyish slacks and a fedora).

Allen has said that ‘Annie Hall’ was his first film to go ‘deeper’. And at its heart is the sad message that finding your soulmate doesn’t guarantee a happy ending. Or, as an old woman tells Alvy: ‘Love fades.’ But for all that, ‘Annie Hall’ is hands down the most hilarious film ever made about love, hysterically funny and packed with gags. CC

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3

In the Mood for Love (2000)

Director: Wong Kar-Wai

Cast: Tony Leung Chiu Wai, Maggie Cheung

Best quote: 'Feelings can creep up just like that. I thought I was in control.'

Defining moment: Leung whispers his secret into the ruins of a wall.

The agony and the ecstasy
Sometimes, unconsummated love can be the most real of all. Few films, if any, have portrayed that notion quite so exquisitely as Wong Kar-Wai’s ‘In the Mood for Love’, a stunningly sumptuous 1962-set period piece detailing the affair that almost begins between beautiful neighbours (played by Tony Leung and Maggie Cheung) who learn that their spouses are sleeping with each other.

Watching Cheung repeatedly walk past Leung in a dark Hong Kong alleyway in slow-motion to the aching strains of Umebayashi Shigeru’s string theme, it’s clear just how much emotion can exist between two people who have barely even touched. DE

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2

Casablanca (1942)

Director: Michael Curtiz

Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman

Best quote: 'We’ll always have Paris.'

Defining moment: Bogey tells Ingrid Bergman to get on the plane with her husband, or she’ll regret it. Maybe not today…

The fundamental things
Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, she walks into his. Humphrey Bogart’s choice between the woman he loves and doing the honourable thing is one of the most wrenching you’ll ever see on screen. Seventy years on, it gets the heart racing every time.

Bogey is Rick, a hard-drinking American in Casablanca, a city full of refugees fleeing the Nazis. Most of them wash up in Rick’s bar, including his great lost love Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman). With her is a Czech Resistance leader who’s escaped a concentration camp.

‘Casablanca’ is full of famous lines, but my favourite is Rick’s description of himself heartbroken and abandoned on a train platform – ‘a guy standing in the rain with a comical look on his face, because his insides are kicked out.’ CC

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1

Brief Encounter (1945)

Director: David Lean

Cast: Celia Johnson, Trevor Howard

Best quote: 'This misery can’t last… Not even life lasts very long.'

Defining moment: That most restrained of farewells, Alec squeezing Laura’s shoulder goodbye.

Make tea not love
You’d think that Lean’s tale of stiff-upper-lip emotion would be frightfully and unwatchably old-fashioned today. A married woman falls in love with a married man and they do the decent thing. And…? Unlike ‘Casablanca’, the future of civilisation isn’t hanging on the outcome. Just the happiness of two families. And not to mince words, they’re an unglamorous pair.

She’s Laura (Johnson), a not especially pretty housewife. He’s Alec (Howard), an earnest doctor. So why do we continue to find Lean’s much-loved classic so unbearably moving? Because it’s still thrilling to watch the continents of emotion beneath Laura and Alec’s icy properness. Celia Johnson is like a silent movie star with her huge eyes, showing so much emotion with barely a rustle of an eyelash.

Adapted from a Noël Coward play, ‘Brief Encounter’ is a brilliantly crafted film, beginning with a goodbye in a railway café – the end of an affair that never really was. From there, Lean flashes back to the lovers’ first meeting in the same café. Laura has grit in her eye. Alec gallantly removes it. Later, they run into each other in a restaurant. They have luncheon (this is the 1930s), take a trip to the cinema, drive in the countryside. He borrows a flat for the afternoon for them to meet in, but embarrassment takes over and they don’t make love.

It’s all so very innocent. We listen to her innermost thoughts – as she narrates a kind of an imaginary confession to her sweet but dull husband: ‘I’m an ordinary woman. I didn’t think such violent things could happen to ordinary people.’ Laura and Alec know in their heart of hearts that leaving their families and running off together will not make a happy ending. And so they must part. He accepts a job in South Africa. Our hearts stop with the lovers’ when a busybody crashes their last few precious minutes together. Unforgettable. CC

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