20 of the worst Oscar winners in history

Tom Huddleston sorts the least deserving Academy Award winners

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It’s Oscar season once again – and while Academy members scratch their heads trying to decide which of this year’s crop of worthy titles deserves to take home the big prize, we trawl the archives to uncover the worst Oscar offences of all time. From the film that beat ‘Citizen Kane’ to Best Picture to the time ‘Harry and the Hendersons’ walked away with a handful of gold, here are all the Academy’s biggest blunders in one handy list.

This is by no means a definitive rundown of all of Oscar’s shoddy decisions – we didn’t even have room to mention Celine Dion or ’Chicago’ – so if you really, really hate ‘Titanic’ or really, really love ‘Forrest Gump’, tell us about it in the comments box below.

  • Victor Fleming for ‘Gone with the Wind’ (1939)

    Best Director, 12th Academy Awards, 1939

    A problematic win on two counts: firstly, because Fleming wasn’t the only director on the film (George Cukor was replaced three weeks in, while studio employee Sam Wood occupied the chair when Fleming temporarily stormed off) and secondly because this sweeping adaptation of Margaret Mitchell’s arguably racist novel doesn’t really stand up to modern scrutiny.

    It could’ve been...
    John Ford for ‘Stagecoach’, Frank Capra for ‘Mr Smith Goes to Washington’, William Wyler for ‘Wuthering Heights’.

    Read review

  • How Green was My Valley’ (1941)

    Best Picture, 14th Academy Awards, 1941

    Of all the John Ford masterpieces that could have won Best Picture, why this hokey, unconvincing tale of strike action set in the Welsh valleys but shot in Malibu Canyon was the one to go the distance is anybody’s guess – especially considering the phenomenal competition.

    It could’ve been...
    Citizen Kane’, ‘The Maltese Falcon’, ‘Sergeant York’.

    Read review

  • The Greatest Show on Earth’ (1952)

    Best Picture, 25th Academy Awards, 1953

    Legendary producer-director Cecil B DeMille may be one of the key figures in the history of American cinema, but that doesn’t mean his films were all great. Gaudy circus story ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ may have packed them in at the box office, but you’d be hard-pressed to mount a strong artistic defence of this trashy, overlong epic.

    It could’ve been...
    The Bad and the Beautiful’ (not nominated),‘High Noon’.

    Read more

  • ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ (1956)

    Best Picture, 29th Academy Awards, 1957

    Sometimes the Academy don’t just get the winners wrong, but the whole damn ceremony: in 1957, while the likes of ‘The Searchers’, ‘Written on the Wind’ and ‘Forbidden Planet’ were wowing audiences at home, with ‘The Ladykillers’, ‘La Strada’ and ‘Seven Samurai’ on release worldwide, the Academy saw fit to reward this turgid family romp, while the nominees were rounded out with epically tedious crud like ‘Giant’, ‘The King and I’ and ‘The Ten Commandments’.

    It could’ve been...
    A year to remember.

  • Leon Shamroy for ‘Cleopatra

    For Best Cinematography, 36th Academy Awards, 1963

    That this bloated, tedious and wildly overpriced historical epic took any awards at all is disgraceful, but the one which really sticks in the craw is Cinematography. Not only does the film look like it’s been shot through a veneer of blancmange, but it triumphed over arguably the most visually sumptuous film ever made, ‘The Leopard’, which wasn’t even nominated.

    It could’ve been...
    The above, ‘8 ½’ (not nominated) or ‘Irma La Douce’.

    Read more

  • The Sound of Music’ (1965)

    Best Picture, 38th Academy Awards, 1965

    The mid-'60s were a grim time for Hollywood both artistically and economically, as reflected by a truly lacklustre brace of Best Picture nominees at the 1966 awards: alongside Robert Wise’s excruciatingly cheerful nuns ‘n’ Nazis romp were ranged the likes of ‘Doctor Zhivago’, ‘Darling’ and something called ‘A Thousand Clowns’.

    It could’ve been...
    Um… ‘Von Ryan’s Express’?

    Read more

  • Une Homme et une Femme’ (1966)

    Best Foreign Language Film, 39th Academy Awards, 1966

    It may have looked slick, exciting and frightfully modern at the time, but Claude Lelouch’s paper-thin romantic romp now seems trite, dated and disgustingly self-satisfied – as relentlessly annoying as its twittering oh-so-French theme song.

    It could’ve been...
    The Battle of Algiers’, ‘Loves of a Blonde’.

    Read more

  • John G Avildsen for ‘Rocky

    Best Director, 49th Academy Awards, 1977

    We’ve nothing against ‘Rocky’ – it’s a solid slice of old-fashioned underdog wish fulfilment – but could the Academy really justify the decision to grant it not just Best Picture but the directing award for journeyman John G Avildsen, whose ensuing career – ‘The Karate Kid’ trilogy, anyone? – only makes this award seem all the more ridiculous.

    It could’ve been...
    Alan J Pakula for ‘All the President’s Men’, Martin Scorsese for ‘Taxi Driver’ (not nominated) or Sidney Lumet for ‘Network’.

    Read more

  • ‘I Just Called to Say I Love You’ by Stevie Wonder, from ‘The Woman in Red

    Best Original Song, 57th Academy Awards, 1985

    Everyone loves Stevie Wonder, and with good reason, but even before the song was verbally lambasted by John Cusack in ‘High Fidelity’, it was widely accepted that this drippy, cloying romantic ballad is one of the soul pioneer’s low points.

    It could’ve been...
    Footloose’, ‘Ghostbusters’, ‘Against All Odds’, ‘Purple Rain’.

    Read more

  • Out of Africa’ (1986)

    Best Picture, 58th Academy Awards, 1986

    In the mid-'80s, the Academy suddenly became obsessed with dishing out heaps of awards to grandiose, sweeping tales of life in foreign lands: see ‘Gandhi’, ‘Platoon’, and ‘The Last Emperor’. While each of those films is defensible, the same can’t really be said of this tiresome, glacially-paced colonial romance.

    It could’ve been...
    Witness’, ‘Ran’ (not nominated), ‘Prizzi’s Honor’.

    Read more

  • Rick Baker for ‘Harry and the Hendersons’ (1988)

    Best Makeup, 60th Academy Awards, 1988

    ‘Academy Award winner “Harry and the Hendersons”’ must be one of the oddest accolades ever devised, but it’s nonetheless true. The make-up fraternity may simply have been rewarding FX legend Rick Baker for past achievements, but whatever their reasoning, this dire family monster-com had no right to be within sniffing distance of awards glory.

    It could’ve been...
    Absolutely anything else.

    Read more

  • Driving Miss Daisy’ (1990)

    Best Picture, 62nd Academy Awards, 1990

    Sometimes the Academy seem to enjoy making things difficult for themselves. To nominate this good-natured but worryingly old-fashioned race-relations weepie rather than Spike Lee’s dynamic, challenging ‘Do the Right Thing’ was insult enough. To then give crotchety old ‘Miss Daisy’ four awards including the big prize was an unforgiveable injury.

    It could’ve been...
    The above, or ‘My Left Foot’, ‘Dead Poets Society’, ‘Born on the 4th of July’.

    Read more

  • Anthony Hopkins for ‘The Silence of the Lambs’, Al Pacino for ‘Scent of a Woman

    Best Actor, 64th and 65th Academy Awards, 1992, 1993.

    Wild overacting has always been a surefire hit with Academy voters, but this double-thick feast of juicy ham took it to new heights. Anthony Hopkins seems to be blending Bela Lugosi and William Shatner in his lip-smacking turn as conveniently named Hannibal ‘the Cannibal’ Lecter, while Al Pacino simply marches about scaring pigeons by yelling ‘Hoo-ha!’ at the top of his voice. Great actors, ridiculous performances, Oscar glory.

    It could’ve been...
    Robert De Niro, Robin Williams (1992), Clint Eastwood, Denzel Washington (1993).

  • Three drippy ballads from Disney

    Best Song, 65th, 67th and 68th Academy Awards, 1993, 1995, 1996

    In the mid-1990s, the Walt Disney Company exerted a stranglehold over the Best Song category, resulting in wins for three unlistenably schmaltzy ballads – A Whole New World from ‘Aladdin’, Can You Feel the Love Tonight? from ‘The Lion King’ and Colors of the Wind from ‘Pocahontas’ – each of which combine lowest-common-denominator lovelorn lyrics, hideously catchy melodies and slushy string-based instrumentation.

    It could’ve been...
    Anything by Randy Newman.

  • Forrest Gump’ (1994)

    Best Picture, 67th Academy Awards, 1994

    America loves to pat itself on the back, but this slick, saccharine, deeply reactionary nostalgia-fest is one giant leap too far. Tom Hanks gives a dead-eyed, inexplicably Best Actor-winning performance as the dullard man-child whose simple, old-timey wisdom inevitably gets the better of revolutionaries, counterculturists and those pesky Vietnamese.

    It could’ve been: Pulp Fiction’, ‘The Shawshank Redemption’, ‘Quiz Show’.

    Read more

  • A Beautiful Mind’ (2002)

    Best Picture, 74th Academy Awards, 2002

    By the late 90s, it seemed the Academy had decided to avert any chance of controversy by doling out awards to the blandest, most inoffensive movie they could find (see also: ‘Shakespeare in Love’, ‘Titanic’, ‘Chicago’). The worst offender in this category has to be Ron Howard’s entirely forgettable maths ‘n’ madness biopic, a disease-of-the-week TV movie which somehow escaped into the multiplex.

    It could’ve been...
    The Fellowship of the Ring’, ‘Gosford Park’, ‘Mulholland Dr’ (not nominated).

    Read more

  • Renee Zellweger for ‘Cold Mountain’ (2003)

    Best Supporting Actress, 76th Academy Awards, 2003

    Proof that it’s possible for a single supporting performance to sink an entire film, Renee Zellweger’s slack-jawed, fish-faced female-Forrest-Gump ruined this otherwise decent landscape drama from Anthony Minghella – but the Academy saw fit to reward her nonetheless.

    It could’ve been...
    Patricia Clarkson in ‘Pieces of April’, Shohreh Agdashloo in ‘House of Sand and Fog’.

    Read more

  • Crash’ (2005)

    Best Picture, 78th Academy Awards, 2006

    2005 was the year politics returned to Hollywood, with the Middle East (‘Munich’), gay rights (‘Brokeback Mountain’) and America’s troubled political history (‘Good Night and Good Luck’) all on the agenda. ‘Crash’ was a political film too, but in the lily-livered, hand-wringing, don’t-say-anything-unless-you-say-something-offensive-by-mistake vein – so of course it snatched the big prize.

    It could’ve been...
    Any of the above.

    Read more

  • The Secret in Their Eyes’ (2010)

    Best Foreign Language Film, 82nd Academy Awards, 2010

    Seems like the Academy got their definition of ‘best’ completely upside down when they opted to garland Juan José Campanella’s overwrought and near-farcical Argentinean pseudo-political potboiler with an award. Sure, it was a popular hit at the box office, but if you’re saying it’s even an eighth as good as ‘The White Ribbon’or ‘A Prophet’, then you need to have serious words with yourself.

    It could have been...
    Either of the above.

    Read more

  • Mauro Fiore for ‘Avatar

    Best Cinematography, 82nd Academy Awards, 2010

    How can a film made on a computer win an award for Cinematography? Would ‘Toy Story’ be equally eligible? And even if it wasn’t the product of 10,000 keyboard-bothering nerds rather than one experienced cameraman, the fact remains that ‘Avatar’ may be slick and action-packed but it’s not a particularly lovely film to look at, unless you’re a big fan of puce green and baby blue.

    It could’ve been...
    The White Ribbon’. End of story.

    Read more

Victor Fleming for ‘Gone with the Wind’ (1939)

Best Director, 12th Academy Awards, 1939

A problematic win on two counts: firstly, because Fleming wasn’t the only director on the film (George Cukor was replaced three weeks in, while studio employee Sam Wood occupied the chair when Fleming temporarily stormed off) and secondly because this sweeping adaptation of Margaret Mitchell’s arguably racist novel doesn’t really stand up to modern scrutiny.

It could’ve been...
John Ford for ‘Stagecoach’, Frank Capra for ‘Mr Smith Goes to Washington’, William Wyler for ‘Wuthering Heights’.

Read review


Users say

73 comments
John D
John D

Forrest Gump is not brain dead patriotism, it is a masterpiece work about existentialism. Pulp Fiction is amazing, but what makes it better, because its edgy? If your mad that Forrest Gump plays tribute to American History, why are you not mad pulp fiction plays tribute to the Exploitation genre? Forrest Gump should be every bodys role model, he is un judging and full of love and life. 

https://philosophynow.org/issues/83/Forrest_Gump


Joshua N
Joshua N

For 2002, I'd argue that "Ghost World" was also deserving of a Best Picture nomination.

Tex S
Tex S

Forrest Gump and Out of Africa were travesties and emblematic of the pablum the academy loves. The English Patient could have also been included. And you should have made the list 21 to give room to Chicago, the terrible on all levels movie/musical. 


PTxS

paul k
paul k

    Dr. Doolittle won best score and best song ("Talk to the Animals").  Paul Simon was not even nominated for the score for The Graduate and "Mrs. Robinson".

imLifing
imLifing

I thought the Sound of Music was phenomenal.

Jhon C
Jhon C

Carol Reed for Oliver! and not for The Third Man or The Fallen Idol. Specially when the winning was above Stanley´s Kubrick 2001: A Space Odyssey and Gillo Pontecorvo for The Battle of Algiers

Burn
Burn

Best director- Bob Fosse for Cabaret over Francis Ford Coppola for The Godfather Best Actor- Art Carney over Al Pacino and Jack Nicholson Ordinary People and Robert Redford over Martin Scorsese and Raging Bull Dances with Wolves and Kevin Costner over Martin Scorsese and Goodfellas Scorsese again for Aviator losing to Clint Eastwood

Burn
Burn

I agree with most but not Forrest Gump. I love Pulp Fiction, Shawshank and Quiz Show but Gump was groundbreaking for special effects and editing. Not to mention the directing, score, acting, and camera work were unbelievable. Whereas the other 3 had some of those elements, Gump had all those and easily deserved Best Picture

Peter
Peter

They are scared to put Denzel Washinton (one of the greatest actors by the way) for that awful movie/performance, "training day".

I liked The Secret in Their Eyes.
I liked The Secret in Their Eyes.

I don't understand how Un Prophet was so much better than it. It was just The Godfather in prison, but instead of Italians, there was an Arab dude. Though The White Ribbon definitely deserved to win.

Chara
Chara

The Secret in Their Eyes was a much better movie than The White Ribbon, a totally pretentious oscar-begging movie with no heart in it at all. Crash was also the best movie in its category that year. It was an outsider but truly the best one. I am utterly surprised that you left outside of your list Gwyneth Paltrow (Shakespeare in Love) winning instead of Cate Blanchett (Elizabeth) in 1999. In my opinion, that was the most undeserved Oscar even given.

mr e
mr e

"doesn’t really stand up to modern scrutiny" ---- what can? two things: 1) in about 2 years, your use of modern will be outdated, and 2) i don't think Victor Fleming knew or could even consider what could hold up in 75 years...he just set out to make the best movie he could..

ddhandarah
ddhandarah

This is one of the most tedious, unconstructive lists I've ever read. Some of your choices are good and some of them are bad, but what makes the entire article so much worse is the childish, flippant, and altogether condescending tone. Grow up.

trailrunnr
trailrunnr

Just saw Terms of Endearment ... should be on this list.

siddharth sen
siddharth sen

are you sick..titanic is a piece of ART..it was ike a painting whole movie..rest nearly ok..there is reason why u aint in d jury..i understnd ..WHY??

Matt
Matt

"...the fact remains that ‘Avatar’ may be slick and action-packed but it’s not a particularly lovely film to look at, unless you’re a big fan of puce green and baby blue." Really, though? It's a movie that uses the stunning visual effects/landscapes/characters as the main selling point. I can totally understand how a person would possibly dislike the movie, as a whole... but, how can you seriously say that the visual aspect of the film wasn't extraordinarily beautiful?

sarah
sarah

A Beautiful Mind forgettable? What is wrong with you? Although I do agree The Fellowship of the Ring is a far better choice, you can't possibly call A Beautiful Mind forgettable and made-for-TV-escaped-to-cinema piece. Also, Tom Hanks in Forest? Say what you want about the movie, but his performance is brilliant. To each his own, I guess...

David
David

Tom Huddleston, you are amazing. I wonder, do you stay up nights trying to come up with clever put-downs and then quickly write them down when you get a "Eureka?" If not, you just have a natural knack for nasty insults, which would only be a compliment to drunken white trash. To say that Anthony Hopkins didn't deserve the Oscar for Silence of the Lambs is like saying The Beatles didn't deserve the Grammy for Revolver. While the Academy almost never represents the year's best movies and nearly always nominates the same handful of safe, big budget dramas (and one indie) for everything, you actually managed to denigrate some of their best choices. Congratulations.

Joe
Joe

I agree with most of your choices, although the list could've gone on another eighty slides. The Academy gets it wrong more often than not, and the Oscars have become a giant popularity contest. If the award for best picture actually went to the best film of the year, there would be many more foreign films nominated. How is it that the Blind Side is nominated for best picture but not Pan's Labyrinth? (Different years, I know).

Red
Red

I think you missed Jennifer Hudson in Dreamgirls. The award is for acting, right? Nobody who votes at the Academy noticed that she gave a one note, amateur performance? In the original stage musical Effie White is the lead character who goes from wide eyed young girl, to disillusioned young woman until finally a proud woman who triumphs. Jennifer Hudson gave us bitter, angry girl from beginning to end.

Vince Adkins
Vince Adkins

The Titanic was a self-serving and tedious movie, allowing its two characters, representatives of both lower and richer classes to come together -- big deal. No mention was ever that more rich white guys survived than poor women and their children. And the centurian proclaims that her romance liberated her from...well, everything. Forest Gumb is a sordid story about how one not-too-bright character's unintentional behavior continued to change history of its time. It goes down with all the tripe that leaves audiences feeling better about themselves. The Shashank Redemption might as well won best picture so certain hope would triumph against adversity.

Una
Una

I don't really understand why you've decided to put The Sound of Music in as a 'worst Oscar winner'. It's clearly a succesful film, and by your own description the most promising out of the other nominees? In fact, this entire list bar a couple is ridiculously innacurate.

radiowarsx
radiowarsx

You are very right and VERY wrong in this list. The right: Crash is terrible. The wrong: The Secret in their Eyes is beautiful. You also seem to have a big misunderstanding of context. Even dated performances deserved awards recognition at their given time, because they tapped into something manifest in the moment. Anthony Hopkins, for example, represented something aesthetically and culturally terrifying at a time when Bundy, Gein, and Heidnik were haunting our headlines.

LisPol
LisPol

What about American Beauty winning over Cider House Rules in 2000? Also, hope Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is not overlooked this year, should at least be nominidated.

RaeJeanne
RaeJeanne

Just opinions,--What I have noticed over the years is that the winners tend to be released late in the season and assume all of us rush madly to the box office as soon as a show is released. When I dine out I do not generally spend as much as a movie ticket costs, and although there is magic in the cinema, it is not the same as when there was a real curtain and the movie was watched in a theatre with gargoyles and balconies. I also realize there are social and political reasons for Oscar choices; only time determines a true classic.

Steve
Steve

This is a really embarrassing list: Gone With the Wind is apparently not very good, A Beautiful Mind is a TV movie, Anthony Hopkins most memorable performance is stupid and three of Disney's most celebrated songs come under fire. Idiot.

strom-z
strom-z

"I can't take anyone who thinks that Mulholland Drive is a better film than A Beautiful Mind seriously." - if you switched the movies in your sentence it would make more sense

Ken
Ken

Almost every movie that won in the 80s was the wrong choice. Around the world in 80 days is a joke. The secret in their eyes was a great movie though. and while how green was my valley is not a terrible movie cant believe it beat out citizen kane

Drew
Drew

I can't take anyone who thinks that Mulholland Drive is a better film than A Beautiful Mind seriously.

The Squiss
The Squiss

What about Tom Hanks as Best Actor for Philadelphia instead of Anthony Hopkins for Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins for Shadowlands, Daniel Day-Lewis for In The Name of The Father or Liam Neeson for Schindler's List? OR Tommy Lee-Jones as Best Supporting Actor for The Fugitive over Leonardo DiCaprio for What's Eating Gilbert Grape?

The Squiss
The Squiss

And then there's Kenneth Branagh being nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay for the unexpurgated Hamlet! www.thesquiss.co.uk

Zoeb
Zoeb

This is a really clever list I have to admit. Forrest Gump, with its predictable story, did not deserve the Oscar, that was rightfully Tarantino's for Pulp Fiction. On the other hand, Rocky winning best Picture and Director was bad enough. Network and Taxi Driver really did deserve the wins. And why is not Titanic in the list? It did not deserve the Oscar at all. Also, Slumdog Millionaire.... not worthy as well. Avatar- best cinematography- Oscar was playing a big joke on the audience.

Ay
Ay

Add: Sandra Bullock (being nominated is bad enough) winning, Julia Roberts, Slumdog Millionaire, War Horse getting nominated, most anything by Steven Spielberg, actually; also add: James Cameron, Extremely Loud being nominated, The Help (a feel good movie for anglo Americans about a cruel and trying time where there was little to feel good about), Aaron Sorkin, Inception being nominated, Denzel Washington for Training Day, any nomination or award for Ron Howard, the best picture to Lord of the Rings final installment.....and so many more....I think the point is that they get more things wrong than they do right....why? B/c it is comprised of people from within the very industry that gives them jobs so they want to maintain the status quo for the most part; it is a reflection of what American audiences (for the most part) react to, which is not necessarily the best made film; and b/c The Academy has a identity struggle, trying- like a chile, or The Supreme Court- to maintain legitimacy and all too often shedding any sense of legitimacy by caving into bad hollywood overwrought melodrama...cue the Batman music b/c its next on the caravan of bad films to get nominated in 2013.

will
will

It is extremely egregious for you to say Anthony Hopkins and Al Pacino didn't deserve their Oscars. Those were two amazing performances, especially Hopkins's performance-simply chillng. And playing a blind man while delivering that performance is very difficult. Number 13 is really outrageous. And that comment on Gone With the Wind is just plane stupid. And Driving Miss Daisy, while a snub, isn't one of the worst. The Oscars are the highest achievement in film industry. And saying they're a load of crap is basically saying that Ledger winning best actor in Dark Knight is a load of crap; The Godfather winning best picture is a load of crap; Nicholson winning best actor for Cuckoo's Nest is a bunch of crap. So the Academy Awards are not a load of crap.

Patsy
Patsy

the deer hunter was a sorry movie

patsy brown
patsy brown

the sorriest movie i have ever seen was babel

markinbooone
markinbooone

Mine (and others') strong disagreements with some of the author's criticisms - and equally strong agreements with others - are simply proof that the Academy Awards are not the final word on artistic merit, an erroneous belief held too long by too many. The Oscars are, more often than not, just an exclusive popularity contest among the cliques in the industry, whose subjectivity is mired in whatever project they happen to have been consumed with when voting comes around. Their inside knowledge of the politics of the industry seems to be a more likely influence on the nominations and selections than entertainment value (like the author's mention of an award given that really rewards past work). Most people don't go to see a movie because the cast includes a trademarked award before somebody's name - they go because they like the genre, the talent, or the preview. It's a mystery to me why the Academy Award still has any street cred at all.

JLehtonen
JLehtonen

I understand this thing was meant to be funny but... It is an extremely weak argument to play the racism card with Gone With The Wind and then suggest Ford's Stagecoach instead. Stagecoach is definitley as racist as GWTW... no, it is even more so. It pictures apaches only as murderous maniacs. GWTW was the triumph of the studio system, epitome of the Hollwood of that era. In that sense, it deserved every Oscar it got.

Filmfan
Filmfan

Whether or not you like Gone With the Wind, it's obviously false to say that the film doesn't "stand up to modern scrutiny" when it's still loved and watched by millions of people.

Manon
Manon

Everything about Shakespeare in Love, especially Gwyneth Paltrow winning Best Actress

magsasaka1960
magsasaka1960

I'm a big fan of Gene Hackman's. But was his role in "Unforgiven" more worthy of a best supporting actor Oscar than Jack Nicholson's in "A Few Good Men"?

magsasaka1960
magsasaka1960

What about Gwyneth Paltrow (Shakespeare in Love) winning the best actress award over Cate Blanchett (Elizabeth) in 1998? Or...Sandra Bullock (The Blindside) over Meryl Streep (Julie and Julia) in 2009? Was "Shakespeare in Love" really better than "Saving Private Ryan" in 1998? And how could the Academy explain awarding the best picture to "Chicago" over "The Pianist" in 2002?

RK
RK

I caon't believe you did not mention Terms of Endearment winning over the Right Stuff. I stopped watching the awards after that one.

larry b
larry b

1981 Best Picture Choice: Chariots of Fire. Boring, boring. board. It beat out one of Hollywoods most iconic pictures, Raiders of the Lost Ark. Seriously? Or Reds or On Golden Pond would have been better choices than watching a bunch of pasty white Brits running in their underwear.

Jc
Jc

I have to disagree with Gone With The Wind, Forrest Gump and Crash. Gone With the Wind was an epic milestone in American Cinema mostly because at the year 1939, who would have thought that they could come up with a motion picture that have that type of multicolored cinematography and the grand production was just not right for that year (too early). Remember that Ben Hur was made what? 20 or so more years and Gone with the Wind has basically the same caliber in terms of cinematography, production and directing? Second, Forrest Gump was just so slick and sooo damn good in terms of artistic content. Lastly, Crash. We may admit that on that year, Crash was standing alongside good movies like BrokeBack Mountain but all of them had their own edge against each other and Crash had it's own by having a damn good knitty story-line which was comparable to that of Babel.

Allen
Allen

There are 10000 people who will disagree with your assessment of Gone with the Wind not standing up to modern scrutiny to everyone who will agree. Regardless of whether you like or dislike the story and its contents, most people agree it was a watershed in film history and it has been seen by more people than any other film, and is still amazingly popular today. As for the racist comment, yes, slavery was racism in its ultimate form but it happened.

Ray
Ray

The Departed? can consider itself lucky to be in a weak year. I'd agree with everything here apart from Rocky(though Taxi Driver should have won other awards) Also Chariots of Fire was nice and everything but how did it beat REDS?!

Armada D
Armada D

@Burn  are you 10 years old? 

nivenv
nivenv

@Burn  hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah..............hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha. *wipes tear* hahahaha!!!

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