The best Paris markets

Find the best markets in Paris for food, antiques, bric-a-brac and more

Amélie Dupont / Paris Tourist Office

Browse for books, rummage for riches, bargain for bric-a-brac or be a flea market flâneur: Paris's many markets – permanent or weekly, covered or street – are fantastic resources and often very beautiful and atmospheric. For food and drink, markets like Bastille and Saxe-Breteuil are a great opportunity to meet producers and sample new flavours, if not always the cheapest or most efficient way of getting your weekly shopping done. Almost every neighbourhood and arrondissement has its own market; to track down your local stallholders beyond our selection below, check out the comprehensive and up to date listings of all of Paris's markets on the Mairie de Paris's website here (in French). And remember: when taking pictures, it's always polite to ask first.

 

Paris markets by category

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Art and antique markets

Our pick of the most interesting art and antique markets the city has to offer.

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Markets for books and collectables

Exotic stamps, original posters, vintage books and more.

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Pop-up fashion markets

Every so often, they open their doors to some of the best-dressed Parisians in town.

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Flea markets

One man's junk is another man's joy in these bazaars of the bizarre.

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Restaurants

Food and drink markets

These markets know that food and drink are best served with a personal touch.

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Organic markets

These lovely markets are a lifeline for ethically conscious cooks.

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Guides to Paris’s best markets

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Marché Mouffetard

One of the city’s loveliest street markets.

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Marché Bastille

There's more produce here than in most hypermarkets.

Users say
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Marché aux timbres

Millions of stamps and old postcards from around the world.

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Marché International de Rungis

The largest wholesale food market in the world at 232 hectares.

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Les Puces de Montreuil

Montreuil’s flea market is where real folk rifle for antiques nowadays.

Users say
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Marché biologique Raspail

Draws crowds of chic Left Bank residents every Sunday.

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Marché aux Puces de St-Ouen

The biggest flea market in the world?

Users say
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Marché des Enfants Rouges

An ancient orphanage turned deluxe food market.

Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Marché aux Puces de Vanves

The smallest and friendliest of the Paris flea markets.

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Marché d'Aligre

An ancient market on a historic revolutionary site.

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Marché Anvers

A village atmosphere down the hill from Montmartre.

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Marché Saint-Martin

Small, modern, well thought out and in places rather eccentric.

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Comments

6 comments
Kris
Kris

Leuk xxx

Marjorie Williams
Marjorie Williams

Completely agree! Browsing markets in Paris is a superb way to get to know the city. Excellent snapshots & descriptions in this piece. For anyone interested in knowing more about the range of Parisian markets & their open days/hours, look at MARKETS OF PARIS, 2nd ed., written by Dixon Long & myself.

Elizabeth B
Elizabeth B

@Marjorie Williams Does Markets of Paris explain the "rules" of shopping a street market?  What do I need to know?  How do I know how to ask for what I want?  I speak reasonably good french, but will soon be going to my first street market.  (Ave du P. Wilson)  I don't want to make a fool of myself. So far, all I really know is to let them pick the produce...

Marjorie W
Marjorie W

@Elizabeth B  I'm sorry for the time lag but only now became aware of your query. There are no rules other than don't touch the produce, which you already know, so you're off to a good start. Shoppers generally have a better experience when they extend the courtesy of saying "Bonjour," "Merci," and "Au Revoir," don't take photos without asking permission, walk far enough into the market for price comparisons, etc. I'll be addressing this topic and offering more suggestions in an upcoming blog post. If you're still interested, then I invite you to check the website or sign up for posts at www.marjorierwilliams.com for more on this topic. Have a great trip!

Me
Me

Hi there u are smelly

G.G. Weiner
G.G. Weiner

CAR MASCOT or HOOD ORNAMENT by LALIQUE: A Tete de Coq car mascot / mascotte presse-papier or paperweight was purchased at the Bastille market and brought back to England and sold to The Unique Lalique Gallery in Brighton, Sussex