Sensing Spaces: Architecture Reimagined at the Royal Academy

Seven architects are transforming one of the city's most prestigious creative institutions. Here's all you need to know

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For the duration of Sensing Spaces, you won't recognise the Royal Academy. Okay, so the grand Palladian exterior on Piccadilly will look as impressive as ever, but inside, a team of seven architects are transforming the galleries of Burlington House beyond all recognition.

The big aim of Sensing Spaces is to change the way the city thinks about and engages with architecture. At the show's core is a series of space-changing installations – think bamboo pyramids that secrete incense, a disorientating maze of mirrors and a kaleidoscope-coloured tunnel that shifts shape as visitors interact with it.

Check out the video above for a taste of what's in store when the show opens next year, and check back soon for more images, exclusive video content and information on how you can get involved with one of the most exciting shows of 2014.

  • Sensing Spaces at the RA

    Installation view of 'Blue Pavilion' by Pezo von Ellrichshausen.

    Photo © Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2014. Photography: James Harris.

    Sensing Spaces at the RA
  • Sensing Spaces at the RA

    Installation by Kengo Kuma

    Photo © Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2014. Photography: James Harris.

    Sensing Spaces at the RA
  • Sensing Spaces at the RA

    Installation by Diébédo Francis Kéré

    Photo © Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2014. Photography: James Harris.

    Sensing Spaces at the RA
  • Sensing Spaces at the RA

    Installation by Grafton Architects

    Photo © Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2014. Photography: James Harris.

    Sensing Spaces at the RA
  • Sensing Spaces at the RA

    Installation by Grafton Architects.

    Photo © Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2014. Photo: James Harris.

    Sensing Spaces at the RA

Sensing Spaces at the RA

Installation view of 'Blue Pavilion' by Pezo von Ellrichshausen.

Photo © Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2014. Photography: James Harris.


Buy tickets for Sensing Spaces Lates on Feb 21

Sensing Spaces: Architecture Reimagined at the Royal Academy - entry at 6.30pm

Architecture shows, with all their blueprints and models, are rarely the most exciting of prospects. But this show promises something different, inviting major contemporary architectural firms from across the globe to create installations to showcase their work.

Sensing Spaces: Architecture Reimagined at the Royal Academy - entry at 8pm

Architecture shows, with all their blueprints and models, are rarely the most exciting of prospects. But this show promises something different, inviting major contemporary architectural firms from across the globe to create installations to showcase their work.


Users say

6 comments
An Architect
An Architect

Once again architects are elevated to the level of artists. What is presented here is a series of over thought and over worked installations that take themselves far too seriously. There is nothing in this show that hasn't been done better by actual artists. Please can we let Architects design buildings and leave the installations to those qualified to make them.

anon
anon

Very disappointing. there were only about 5 pieces of work. Some pieces seemed only aimed at kids, perhaps thats why you are exhibiting during half term. 14 pounds per person way too expensive for this.

James
James

Not worth the price of £14. There simply not much content and what there actually is pretty good, but not great. I'm not sure how they are justifying this high admission price. If I visited for free, I would think "it's OK". But after paying the high price I can't help but feel a bit ripped off. It's worth 14 minutes of your time, not £14.

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