Greenwich Picturehouse

Cinemas , Multiplex Greenwich
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Hydar Dewachi

Instantly recognisable by its striking glass and brick exterior (which throws buckets of natural light on to the box office and slender upstairs bar), the Greenwich Picturehouse is the number one destination for film lovers in south-east London to watch a movie. There’s everything you'd expect from a Picturehouse cinema here – plump seats, a decent range of drinks and snacks, a programme mixing top-end mainstream releases with artier films – plus a downstairs bar that doubles as a venue for comedy and music gigs. And if you’re feeling peckish, there’s a little Spanish restaurant attached to the foyer.

Venue name: Greenwich Picturehouse
Contact:
Address: 180 Greenwich High Rd
London
SE10 8NN
Opening hours: 7.45pm
Transport: Greenwich rail/DLR
Price: £7, concs £5
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