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Soho Curzon

Chinatown

Arthouse film fans have been known to go weak at the knees at the mention of the Soho Curzon, which has some of the best programming in London – a mix of arty new releases and documentaries, often introduced by the filmmakers themselves. Watching a film at the Curzon always feels special, surrounded by film lovers without it being pretentious. The coffee is good, the bar relaxed, and if you’re watching a British film, you’ll likely be seeing the finished product a stone’s throw from where it was edited in Soho. Perfect for whiling away a rainy afternoon.

Venue name: Soho Curzon
Address: 93-107 Shaftesbury Ave
London
W1D 5DY
Opening hours: Box office 0870 756 4620
Transport: Tube: Leicester Sq
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