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"Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe"

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Christian Louboutin. “Printz,” Spring/Summer 2013–14. Courtesy of Christian Louboutin. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn
Brooklyn Museum, Prospect Heights Until Sunday February 15 2015
People—women and men alike—can't seem to get enough of high heels, and the higher the heel, the more likely that it will attract attention. That ability to captivate is the driving principle behind this show, which argues that, whatever the sexual connotations of high heels, they are also art objects. To illustrate this very sharp point, the exhibit trots out examples of fetishy footwear from the 16th century to the present, courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute and the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto.
Venue name: Brooklyn Museum
Contact:
Address: 200 Eastern Pkwy
Brooklyn

Cross street: at Washington Ave
Opening hours: Wed, Fri–Sun 11am–6pm; Thu 11am–10pm
Transport: Subway: 2, 3 to Eastern Pkwy–Brooklyn Museum
Price: Suggested donation $12, seniors and students $8, children under 12 free. First Saturday of every month 5–11pm free.
    • Suggested donation $12, seniors and students $8, children under 12 free. First Saturday of every mon

      "Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe"

    • Suggested donation $12, seniors and students $8, children under 12 free. First Saturday of every mon

      "Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe"

    • Suggested donation $12, seniors and students $8, children under 12 free. First Saturday of every mon

      "Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe"

    • Suggested donation $12, seniors and students $8, children under 12 free. First Saturday of every mon

      "Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe"

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Desiree F

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This was a great exhibition and wonderfully curated. I love that it wasn't just a chronological account of heeled fashion but detailed about why heels were invented from farming, bathhouses, sign of socioeconomic status, and for style. I loved the very expressive films depicting heeled culture and fantasy worlds. Also loved the interactive tech used to ask questions to the curator. Great stories and visual experience. Not just for fashionistas but for history, design and architecture buffs.