Theater

Your guide to Broadway and theater in NYC: Ticket sales, theater reviews and listings for Broadway shows, Off Broadway shows, musicals and plays

Theater

Ten historic drawings by Broadway’s greatest caricaturist

If ever there were a visual distillation of the spirit of Broadway, it was an Al Hirschfeld caricature.

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The 20 best plays and Broadway musicals this summer

Anyone who believes that the Tony Awards finale means the end of New York’s theater season should think again. Whether it’s new Broadway musicals—bafflingly obscure (Amazing Grace) or wildly anticipated (Hamilton)—or exotic imports at Lincoln Center Festival, the summer is as drama-filled as fall and spring. 

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Theater

Review: An Act of God

There aren’t many lies you can tell about God that organized religion hasn’t told already: He is loving; He rewards the faithful; He is a He; and the biggest crock of all—that He exists

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Blog

Give Kristin Chenoweth the Tony Award she deserves

The Tony Awards will be broadcast on CBS on June 7

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Theater

The complete guide to Shakespeare in the Park in NYC

Every summer, the Public Theater produces a beloved New York democratic tradition: Shakespeare in the Park, presented for free at the open-air Delacorte Theater in Central Park.

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Theater and Broadway shows in New York

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Time Out's picks

The best shows on Broadway and off, as chosen by Time Out's critics.

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Best Broadway shows

The perfect short list of the most exciting plays, musicals and revivals on Broadway.

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Off Broadway shows

Reviews and tickets for Off Broadway shows in New York

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Off-Off Broadway shows

Reviews and tickets for Off-Off Broadway shows in New York.

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Theater tickets and offers

Blue Man Group

Blue Man Group is not just a show; it’s a state of mind. Get tickets to this wildly popular and ever-evolving production

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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The Book of Mormon

Buy tickets for the smash hit show from the creators of 'South Park'!

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Aladdin

Book your tickets to the new, Tony Award winning Broadway rendition of Disney’s classic animated film Aladdin!

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Gazillion Bubble Show

Now $45, Was $75

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2015 Tony Awards

Theater

The Tony Awards

There is no bigger night in New York theater than the annual Tony Awards, when the best on Broadway are recognized for their outstanding acting, brilliant musical numbers, stellar direction, writing and everything else that makes theatergoers the devoted fans they are. It's a thrill to revisit all the highs of the season, pore overthe Tony nominees list and root for the productions and people that moved us the most. With this ultimate guide to the 2015 Tony Awards, you can revisit every stellar moment from the Broadway season, vote on who you think the Tony winners will be, read interviews with some of the outstanding talent and get prepped to watch the awards broadcast on Sunday, June 7, 2015. When are the Tony Awards? The 69th Annual Tony Awards are on June 7, 2015 at 8:00 PM ET. Where are the Tony Awards? The Tony Awards are held at Radio City Music Hall and televised live on CBS. How to get tickets to the Tony Awards? Tickets to the 69th Annual Tony Awards will go on sale in the spring on the Tony Awards website.

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Blog

Broadway watch: post-Tony nomination massacres

It’s a grim annual ritual: Tony Award nominations come out and snubbed shows start dropping like flies. Yesterday it was Living on Love, the Renée Fleming vehicle that received less than loving responses, struggled at the box office, and then gave up after garnering zero nods. Living on Love goes cold this Sunday.The Heidi Chronicles opted for pre-emptive action: After failing to draw audiences to this Wendy Wasserstein revival—despite casting Mad Men star Elisabeth Moss—producers announced a premature end last week. It also shutters after Sunday’s matinee.So who’s next? All eyes are on Doctor Zhivago, which got some of the nastiest notices of the season (including this pan from yours truly). The show looks expensive to keep going on what must be terrible word of mouth, and it too was completely ignored by Tony nominators. Last week the box office take was $485K—probably shy of the behemoth’s weekly “nut” (the basic cost of running it). But with 50 producers (is that a record?) there might be cash sloshing around to burn. But how long?Hand to God (five nominations) and It Shoulda Been You (zero nominations) each filled 73% of the house last week. The Visit was at 72% capacity. Each is praying to do better business in coming months, either from June Tony wins or an uptick in word of mouth.Otherwise, most of the nominated shows are doing well at the box office: The King and I, Something Rotten!, An American in Paris and Fun Home are playing to full or near-full capacity. Wolf H

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Nods, snubs and sweeps: Five takeaways from the 2015 Tony Award nominations

By: David Cote & Adam Feldman This morning, Broadway-bound Bruce Willis and Mary-Louise Parker announced the nominees for the 2015 Tony Awards. While for us there weren’t a lot of surprises (our pre-nominations were pretty close), there are still lessons to be drawn from the announcement. 1. Choreography is more than dance. Most of the names in this category came as no surprise: Christopher Wheeldon for his gorgeous ballet sequences for An American in Paris and Casey Nicholaw’s boffo Elizabethan England–meets–Las Vegas showmanship in Something Rotten! But less expected was Scott Graham & Steven Hoggett for Frantic Assembly, which created the intricate movement vocabulary for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. In this hyper-stylized drama about a youth on the autism spectrum, no character dances, per se, but every footstep and gyration has been carefully plotted out. Nice to see Tony acknowledging that all movement has a method. 2. Harvey Weinstein snubbed—or was he? The widely panned Peter Pan musical Finding Neverland did not receive a single Tony nomination, which some have seen as a defiant gesture toward the show’s producer, Hollywood superpower Harvey Weinstein. And yes, Weinstein has made a lot of clumsy missteps in his dealings with the Broadway community. But the truth is that Finding Neverland just isn’t very good, and in a year with so much competition—ten original musicals, plus five revivals—it was roundly outclassed. Finding Neverland didn’t ne

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Theater

The 25 best Tony Awards performances

The Tony Awards are not just a celebration of excellence in Broadway theater, but also a national showcase and public record of performances that are otherwise local and fleeting. The most memorable Tony moments can echo in theater history for years or decades to come. But which are the best of the best? We've surveyed every performance of a nominated musical or musical revival since CBS's first Tony telecast (in 1967), and here's our list of the top 25. Note that we're limiting ourselves to Tony-nominated shows in the years they were nominated; don't look here for special material, musical guests, opening medleys and the like. So without further ado—and steeling yourself for the possibility that some of your favorites didn't make the cut—prepare to be razzle-dazzled by the greatest of the Great White Way. Curtain up! RECOMMENDED: See complete Tony Awards coverage

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Latest theater and Broadway reviews

Theater

The Upper Room

There isn't a whole lot happening in The Upper Room—or, rather, it's the end of the world, yet it still feels like a quiet retreat, a rest before the drama kicks in. Some of this sleepy quality comes from Catherine Brookman's excellent tunes

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Theater

Nice Girl

Nice Girl: Theater review by Adam Feldman Two years ago, Diane Davis made a powerful impression as the obscenely monstrous daughter of a retired couple in The Model Apartment. As the title character in Melissa Ross’s absorbing Nice Girl, she’s equally persuasive—less shocking but subtle and touching—as a very different woman at odds with her elderly mother. Davis plays Josephine, who shares a home in suburban Boston with her long-widowed, dependent, housebound mom, Francine (Kathryn Kates); it is 1984, and Josephine, at 37, has all but resigned herself to a life of spinsterhood. The flirtation of a neighborhood butcher (Nick Cordero) and the encouragement of a vivacious new work friend (Liv Rooth) give her a new lease on life—but leasing is not the same as owning. In Mimi O’Donnell’s sensitive staging for Labyrinth Theater Company (on a terrific set by David Meyer), Josephine is sympathetic but not maudlin, and Ross is refreshingly unhurried in depicting her plight. The dialogue gives the characters room to breathe, though it occasionally strays from 1980s idiom, and Davis pulls off the difficult feat of making shyness dramatically compelling, suggesting wheels of emotion turning behind the mostly placid surface. Nice Girl does take one major false turn—a contrivance as predictable as it is far-fetched—and its ending is needlessly ambiguous. But the play works: It draws your attention to a woman who would not presume to command it.—Adam Feldman Bank Street Theater (Off Broadw

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Summerworks Festival 2015

Summerworks Festival 2015: D Deb Debbie Deborah Theater review by Helen Shaw Most of the time, the tiptoeing critic can avoid spoilers: You hint at plot without telling who dies; you don't give away the eleventh-hour coup de théâtre. But what to do when a thriller puts its best, most surprising scene in its first 15 minutes? The only option is to get a bit…vague. Let me hasten to add that this review will be the most positive vague I can manage, since Jerry Lieblich's D Deb Debbie Deborah boasts moments of slippery gorgeousness, some of which have to be seen to be believed. Yet exactly how he and expert director Lee Sunday Evans manipulate our understanding of identity should probably remain a mystery, perhaps even to we who have seen the show. The titular Deb (deft, hilarious Brooke Bloom) has just started a new job. After some uncanny experiences at home—an intercom conversation turns eerie, her boyfriend (Nick Choksi) seems unfamiliar—she finds herself working for a famous artist (Geoff Sobelle), helping him with a project based in imitation and re-creation. The project eats up her time, then it seems to eat up the play itself: Sobelle and Choksi repeatedly exchange roles and even Deb herself frays existentially. When more art-world characters arrive (played by Stacey Yen and Kate Benson), they sometimes play the same characters we've already met. Has Deb gone mad? Or is this theater's revenge for centuries of double casting? By the play's whirling climax, five actors pla

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Theater

The Sound and the Fury

The Sound and the Fury: Theater review by David Cote The weirdest yet homiest of Elevator Repair Service’s trilogy of literature-based performances, this ravishing immersion into William Faulkner (first seen in 2008 at New York Theatre Workshop) demands patience and calmness in the midst of sensory overload. Like the piece’s developmentally disabled central character, Benjy (played by the singular Susie Sokol and, on alternate performances, by the equally compelling Aaron Landsman and Pete Simpson), you feel like this world is full of bewildering signals, but also profound beauty. This may be the most emotional show I’ve seen by ERS, longtime masters of collaging found text, dance and intricate soundscapes. The formal coolness and ironizing detachment is still there, but relaying a tale that overflows with inchoate family sadness and childhood alienation. Typical of ERS, the performance virtuosity is amazing. Twelve wonderful actors juggle genders, ages and ethnicities, playing members of the Compson household from 1898 to 1928 in nonlinear memory fragments floating through Benjy’s head. It’s Southern Gothic via Joycean pastiche, and while director John Collins & Co. use supertitles and costume pieces to keep timelines and identities clear, you may still get lost. But here, losing your way is how you get home.—David Cote Public Theater (Off Broadway). Created by Elevator Repair Service. Text by William Faulkner. Dir. John Collins. With ensemble cast. 2hrs 15mins. No intermiss

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Theater

The Other Thing

The Other Thing: Theater review by Sandy MacDonald Ghosts are a touchy topic for D.C.-based journalist Kim (Samantha Soule), seeing as, unbeknownst to her, she’s sharing her psyche with a doozy—but playwright Emily Schwend keeps that revelation in reserve for a good long time. 

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Theater

The Flick

Annie Baker’s 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner runs over three hours and is filled with prolonged, dialogue-free stretches in which Massachusetts moviehouse workers sweep up popcorn and paper cups, shuffling between rows, mutely focused on their menial tasks

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Theater

Photo highlights of Elevator Repair Service’s craziest theatrical mash-ups

Although Elevator Repair Service started creating performance pieces (“plays” is too neat) a decade after punk and New Wave, comparisons to New York’s music scene are too tempting. It was the early ’90s, and nobody knew where theater was going—experimental types looked to Richard Foreman, the Wooster Group and Robert Wilson for inspiration.

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The 20 plays and musicals to see this Summer

Anyone who believes that the Tony Awards finale means the end of New York’s theater season should think again. Whether it’s new Broadway musicals—bafflingly obscure (Amazing Grace) or wildly anticipated (Hamilton)—or exotic imports at Lincoln Center Festival, the summer is as drama-filled as fall and spring

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Blog

Steve Guttenberg will do Shakespeare in Riverside Park this June

Steve Guttenberg will be starring in Shakespeare in the Park this summer! Well, okay, not Shakespeare in the Park, but Shakespeare in a park. And okay, not starring, per se...

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Theater

Sleep No More and other immersive theater in NYC

Theater audiences crave the immediacy of live performance, and immersive theater takes that to a different level. Off Broadway shows like Sleep No More break down the barriers between actors and spectators, letting you follow your own paths in unconventional spaces

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Theater in pictures

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The 10 hottest chorus boys in Broadway musicals

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The 10 hottest chorus girls in Broadway musicals

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The 25 best film-to-musical adaptations

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Broadway's 25 all-time greatest divas

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