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Tribeca Film Festival announces competition titles

The Tribeca Film Festival announced the 24 titles that will compete for the Best World Narrative and Best Documentary prizes at this year's 14th edition

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The best movie events in New York this week

One-off screenings, festivals, double-bills, special guests and more. Each week we bring you the very best of New York's alternative movie events

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The best movies to see this month

Our film critics highlight the 10 best movies released in U.S. theaters for the month of March

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Five must-see movies at this year's New York International Children's Film Festival

Running from Fri 27 through Mar 22, NYCIFF 2015 is stuffed to the gills with 100 short and feature-length films

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The best new movies on Netflix in March 2015

The streaming service announces a trove of lucky Irish titles for St. Patrick's Day and much more

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Latest movie releases

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New movies now playing

Looking for a movie to see tonight or this weekend? Check out these new movie reviews by Time Out critics.

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The best movies to see this month

Our film critics highlight the ten best movies released in US theaters for the month of February

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The best new movies on Netflix

Check out our top five new movies on Netflix in March, as well as a full list of everything else streaming

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New movies we love

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Kes

Taking in school and home life in an area where nature meets the mining industry on the Yorkshire skyline, Ken Loach’s most enduring movie is the story of Billy Casper, a smart but wayward boy who, despite a quick mind and tongue, has a reputation as a rogue.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Wild Canaries

A contemporary Cobble Hill riff on Manhattan Murder Mystery, Lawrence Michael Levine’s Wild Canaries may fly along a familiar path, but it’s sexier, smarter and a hell of a lot more fun.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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The Hunting Ground

In this harrowing, high-impact follow-up to The Invisible War (on the rape epidemic within the U.S. military), writer-director Kirby Dick again teams with producer Amy Ziering, to take on reputable colleges that systematically ignore the issue of campus rape, thereby enabling serial predators. 

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Queen and Country

A direct sequel to 1987’s Hope and Glory—and the best thing that John Boorman has made since—Queen and Country begins where that film leaves off, continuing the director’s autobiographical account of his relationship with war and the collateral effect it has on the people at its periphery.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem

“A man is always on trial,” intones a solemn rabbi in Gett, one of the film’s few out-and-out ironic laughs. Most of the time, though, you’ll be quaking with rage.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Wild Tales

Comedy seldom travels well from one culture to another, but to judge from the first episode of this engaging if uneven satire highlighting humanity's more basic instincts, it's clear that young Argentine writer-director Damián Szifron has a knack for latching on to ideas with a humorous dimension that's pretty universal.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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The 10 best Bjork music videos

On March 8, MoMA will launch an expansive midcareer retrospective that looks back on two decades of Björk’s visual work. This exhibit is but the latest evidence that Björk is one of the film world’s most innovative forces of nature—the Icelandic swanstress may only need one name, but her boundless creativity can hardly be confined to one medium. Best known for her music, in which the eternal howl of her voice anchors peerlessly progressive uses of modern technology to an indivisible human core, Björk has supplemented each of her nine solo albums with an array of iconic music videos. In addition to being one of the first artists to meaningfully explore the aesthetic and semiotic value of CG and its relationship to the body, Björk has collaborated with the likes of Michel Gondry, Spike Jonze and Chris Cunningham, pushing these directors toward their potential. She’s the first person of any kind to have an app inducted into MoMA’s permanent collection, and—as if that weren’t enough—she also starred in the best episode of Space Ghost Coast 2 Coast. Insanely, Björk’s contributions to the world of moving images are so immense that her landmark performance in Lars von Trier’s Dancer in the Dark (for which she won the Best Actress prize at Cannes) is little more than a superfluous detail. Follow along below as we count down Björk's 10 best music videos.    10. “Who Is It?” (Dir. Dawn Shadforth, 2004) Medúlla, Björk’s sixth album, is famous for being almost entirely comprised o

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Drummer Antonio Sanchez to perform Birdman score live in NYC

Film scores can sometimes register as so much sonic wallpaper, a barely noticeable backdrop to what's happening onscreen. But the score that renowned jazz drummer Antonio Sanchez contributed to Alejandro González Iñárritu's Best Picture–winning Birdman—a gorgeously realized series of improvised solo performances—is a major exception: As our review pointed out, those beats are absolutely integral to the film's kinetic, at times frenetic pacing. In one of several high-profile 2015 Oscars flaps, Sanchez's contribution was deemed ineligible for a Best Original Score nomination, since the film also featured a conventional classical score. ([Cough] Bullshit. [Cough]) The good news is that invaluable local classical-and-beyond concert presenter Wordless Music is giving the drummer his due, via a Birdman screening and live Sanchez solo performance, taking place Saturday, April 4, at the UWS's Concert Hall at New York Society for Ethical Culture. Tickets for the event—a New York premiere—go on sale here at 10am on Friday, March 6. As Wordless puts it, perhaps over-modestly, tickets "will not last very long, we suspect." A screening of the Best Picture winner, featuring a live performance of 2014's flat-out coolest score? Uh, yeah—we'd tend to agree.

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Watch a trailer for the year's best Sundance movie

We saw more than 50 movies at Sundance this year, but the one that topped our list as the best of the fest was just 16 minutes long. And frankly, it wasn't even close. "World of Tomorrow" is the seventh Don Hertzfeldt short to play at Sundance (his 2000 entry, "Rejected," would eventually go on to be nominated for an Oscar), his second to win the festival's Grand Jury Prize for its category, and the first to make us feel that the rest of our year at the movies might be all downhill from there.  A whirlwind 16-minute adventure through space, time, memory and the limitless potential of the “outernet,” "World of Tomorrow" is the indie animator's first all-digital short (although the brilliantly deranged couch gag that he made for the most recent season premiere of The Simpsons served as something of a dry run). Hertzfeldt's most colorful film follows in its maker's proud tradition of dropping stick figures into grand existential crises, the story for this one introducing a 4-year-old British girl named Emily (Winona Mae) who’s too small and innocent to realize what’s happening when an adult clone of herself (Julia Pott) invites her for a tragicomic tour of the future. Their journey across space and time is packed with adventures both devastating and devastatingly funny—the young Emily is voiced by Hertzfeldt's niece, who's stitched her performance together from the hilarious snippets of audio he recorded while she was visiting him—and it builds to an emotional punch of the gut

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The Tribeca Film Festival will kick off with a history of SNL

With every passing year, the Tribeca Film Festival becomes an increasingly unmissable fixture on the city's cinema calendar. The sprawling event brings hundreds of exciting (and sometimes not so exciting) new movies to the heart of downtown Manhattan. Founded by Robert De Niro and friends in the hopes of rejuvenating the area after 9/11, the festival has always been defined by its connection to the city, and its marquee events tend to reflect that. (Last year's opening night film, Nas: Time Is Illmatic, was a euphoric explosion of Queens pride.) The 2015 edition, which runs April 15–26, is clearly committed to continuing that tradition. Today, the fest announces that this year's opening-night film is Bao Nguyen's Live from New York!, a documentary that looks back at how Saturday Night Live filtered and shaped more than 40 years of American culture, pop or otherwise. Nguyen's film won't be the first feature to turn its cameras on Lorne Michaels's late-night institution (James Franco's Saturday Night, a fly-on-the-wall look at the making of a single episode, played at Tribeca in 2010), but its focus on the program's formative early years promises to make for a unique look at a beloved NYC export. Be sure to come back for the announcement of the festival's full slate in early March, and follow us (@TimeOutUSFilm) for a comprehensive guide to the fest as it takes shape.

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