Sarah Charlesworth, "Objects of Desire: 1983-1988"

  • Art
Critics' pick
1/20
Courtesy Of Maccarone
Sarah Charlesworth, Buddha of Immeasurable Light, 1987
2/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Bird Woman, 1986
3/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Bowl and Column, 1986
4/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Black Mask, 1983
5/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Fear of Nothing, 1988
6/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Black Woman, 1983–1984
7/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Figures, 1983-1984
8/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Blonde, 1983–1984
9/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Garden of Delight, 1988
10/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Goat, 1985
11/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Golden Boy 1983–1984
12/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Golddiggers, 1987
13/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Harness, 1983–1984
14/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Maps, 1987
15/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Red Mask, 1983
16/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Natural History, 1987
17/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Red Scarf, 1983
18/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Tiger, 1985
19/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, Work, 1988
20/20
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Sarah Charlesworth, White T-Shirt, 1983–1984
Free

One of the leading members of the Pictures Generation, Sarah Charlesworth is recognized for her poetic use of appropriated imagery. The focus of this exhibition—her five-part “Objects of Desire” series, created between 1983 and 1988—comments on the iconography of contemporary culture. It explores the exigencies of desire as they pertain to sexuality, religion and nature.

Charlesworth began by cutting out photographs of people, animals and items from various print sources, then rephotographing them against bright monochromatic backgrounds. The results were produced as glossy prints with matching colored frames. Presented as single images, diptychs and triptychs, the 20 pieces here use color to notate different categories of desire, equating, for example, red with sexuality, green with nature and blue with spiritual longing.

Two images against fields of red—of a leather bondage harness and a silhouetted fall of platinum blond hair—evoke the role of absence in desire. Meanwhile, another diptych in black and blue pairs the triangular abracadabra symbol with a set of tools. The work speaks, perhaps, to the combination of magic and craft needed to make art. Luckily, both are very much in evidence here.—Paul Laster

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Event website: http://maccarone.net
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