Bars near the Statue of Liberty

Cap off your sightseeing with a cocktail or a beer with this guide to New York bars near the Statue of Liberty.

Ambrose Hall

A shore escape is a godsend when city temps hit those oppressive 90s, but if a Jitney-bound getaway is out of reach, this South Street Seaport affair is a sunny saving grace. Named for the Lightship Ambrose, and sister to summertime staple Beekman Beer Garden Beach Club, the watering hole trades scratchy beach towels for cushy chaises and that too-close-for-comfort sunbather for a slick finance crowd. The space is split into three locales: a nautical-ish hall inside the historic Schermerhorn Row building, a revved-up surf club atop shipping containers and an easygoing outdoor beer garden. It’s a breeziness on par with a day at the ocean—sans sand at the bottom of your bag. ORDER THIS: In the no-fuss mess hall, coastal lunch fare arrives humbly on paper plates. A classic lobster roll ($17) is deconstructed, broken down as a trio of buttered baguette slices topped with chunky Maine-lobster salad and juicy beefsteak tomato, though the bites could use a brightening spritz of lemon. Substitute the missing citrus with the seafoam-green Spruce Goose Summer ($14), which pins lip-puckering limeade against crisp crème de menthe. GOOD FOR: Though the twinkly lights and sea-kissed air are intoxicating at night, avoid happy hour. With three bars and packed indoor-and-outdoor seating, the staff hustles to keep up at peak times; plus, a bustling beach house can feel more cramped than cool. Instead, sprawl out on cushioned white-wicker loungers at the surf club for a Saturday afternoon booz

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Financial District

The Dead Rabbit

At this time-capsule FiDi nook, you can drink like a boss—Boss Tweed, that is. In a redbrick landmark, Belfast bar vets Sean Muldoon and Jack McGarry (of Northern Ireland’s acclaimed Merchant Hotel) have conjured up a rough-and-tumble 19th-century tavern. And it’s just the kind of saloon that the bare-knuckle Five Points gang the joint’s named after (its emblem was a dead rabbit impaled on a spike) would have frequented. DRINK THIS: Resurrecting long-forgotten quaffs is nothing new in Gotham, but the Dead Rabbit’s sheer breadth of throwback libations eclipses the competition. Spanning 100-some-odd bishops, fixes, nogs and smashes, the bar squarely hits many of these mid-1800s hallmarks. The Byrrh Wine Daisy ($14), era-appropriate in its china teacup with mustache guard, is particularly well wrought: Puckery rhubarb soda, raspberry eau-de-vie and fresh citrus amp up the fruit-forward Byrrh, while bitter Amaro CiaCiaro and piney angelica tinctures squelch any overt sweetness. Some drinks are less successful in their reincarnations (the Tween Deck is a flat mix of Jamaican rum, Sixpoint cask-conditioned ale, lime sherbet and allspice), but the whopping list holds plenty of sure-footed sips alongside the missteps. GOOD FOR: A working-class drink—though that working class is now buttoned-down bankers instead of roughneck Irish dockhands. McGarry and Muldoon liberate the cocktail from its blue-blood trappings. The snug, sawdust-strewn first floor is made for pints and whiskey slu

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Financial District

The Iron Horse

Taking cues from Coyote Ugly, this FiDi saloon makes its bartenders the main event. The all-female cast of boozeslingers is known to perform feats of fire-blowing and hula-hooping while serving cheap swill like $2 Rolling Rocks—one of them may even pull you up on to the bar for a dance. A full menu includes typical bar fare, and if you go there on a Sunday, you can enjoy gratis burgers and hot dogs when you purchase a drink.

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Financial District

Bar Seven Five

The gimmick at this glam hotel drinkery is the absence of the bar itself. In place of the traditional format, mixologists man glossy black stations, and patrons are free to mingle among them. The cocktails, like the Perfect Pearl Manhattan (bourbon, sweet and dry vermouth, and Lagavulin Scotch), are updated twists on Prohibition classics. For those who choose not to cluster around the mixing stations, servers with wooden carts—modeled after ones used on 19th-century Pullman cars—roll the drinks directly to you.

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Financial District

Bavaria Bierhaus

At this bi-level beer hall, servers have donned traditional lederhosen and dirndls for lugging pints of German beers like Schofferhofer Grapefruit and Hofbräu Dunkel. To soak up the suds, find Deutsch bites like jagerschnitzel and sausages. The wooden bar was imported from German town Erding, and there is a 70-seat outdoor space for warm-weather boozing.

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Financial District

Bin No. 220

This sleek Italian-style wine bar, where banker types devour cured meats, cheeses and olive oil, offers refuge from the South Street Seaport tourist scene. Located on historic Front Street, this TONY Eat Out Award winner boasts cast-iron columns, a polished walnut bar and a nifty metal wine rack that showcases the horizontally stowed bottles. Most patrons come for the selection of 60 wines (20 are available by the glass), but a well-stocked bar satisfies those who prefer the hard stuff.

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Financial District

Black Hound

Bartender Jeremy Strawn (the Mulberry Project) mixes literary-themed cocktails at this plush Battery Park City lounge. The rye-and-amaro based Moveable Feast nods to Hemingway, while the Finishing Touches—which features absinthe, maple bitters and roasted pecans—references author Jean Kerr, who wrote a novel by that name. A small menu of plates tends toward the decadent: A surf-and-turf burger is made with American Wagyu beef, while the mac and cheese is studded with truffles.

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Battery Park City

Clinton Hall

A stone's throw from its 19th-century namesake, Castle Clinton—America's first beer garden—the folks behind Watermark Bar honor the storied nabe with a 4,000-square-foot Battery Park beer hall of their own. At the marble bar, 20 taps rotate selections of hard-to-find brews: Huyghe Delirium Tremens, Van Honsebrouck Kasteel Rouge and De Halve Maan Straffe Hendrik Bruges Triple, available in pints, half pints or third pints. A flux capacitor behind the bar controls the carbonation and temperature of each tap, ensuring that pints are served at an optimal 34 degrees. Pub grub includes Bavarian fare like spaetzle, soft pretzels and house-made brats, such as an all-beef link with pickled tomato relish, and lamb sausage infused with cumin and ginger.

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Battery Park

Demi Monde (CLOSED)

Cocktail hotshots David Kaplan and Alex Day—respectively co-owner and former bartender of the exemplary Death & Company—transport enlightened tippling to a larger, louder stage with this 120-seat subterranean bar and New American eatery. Ditching the hushed tones and slo-mo stirring of Death & Company, the pair kitted out the glossy dark granite bar for speed with foot-pedal-controlled sinks and four filtered seltzer taps. Festive bubbles are the star of the drinks program—half of the 16 cocktails are effervescent, and the menu offers four house-made sodas (including celery and strawberry-tarragon) and ten sparkling wines. Plunk down on one of the plush gray banquettes and sip the Heads Up, which combines Aperol, acid phosphate, seltzer and a cutting-edge elixir: vermouth blanc is flash-infused with watermelon via a whipped-cream canister. Day, along with head bartender Scott James Teague (Pegu Club), also created a number of sophisticated noncarbonated concoctions, like the Wolf Tone, made with pisco, grappa, elderflower, eucalyptus and bitters. An art installation of knotted ropes made by bondage artist Midori hangs near the oak-and-brass chef's table, where Phillip Kirschen-Clark (Vandaag) will serve a tasting menu. But his inventive booze-friendly small plates—including Negroni-cured oysters and absinthe-pickled eggs—are also available throughout the space. In the coming months, Handsome Coffee Roasters will open a daytime café in the upstairs lobby.

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Financial District

Growler Bites & Brews

At this canine-themed tavern, the word growler refers to both jugs of beers and bellowing pups. Dog-lovers can bring their pets to the oak-paneled spot—which features antique prints of dogs and an outdoor patio—and choose from 20 American craft suds (Sixpoint, Allagash). To eat, find hot dogs from Mile End and sausages from Salumeria Biellese in pretzel brioche buns, plus fried pickles and sandwiches.

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Financial District

The Honorable William Wall

Sailing diehards can get three sheets to the wind at this two-story booze barge, moored in the Hudson River near Ellis Island during warm-weather months. Accessed via a vintage launch departing from Battery Park's North Cove Marina, the 140-person waterborne watering hole is the official clubhouse for the Manhattan Sailing Club. At the open-air bar on the upper deck, cheer on regattas over plastic cups filled with $5 beers (Coors Light, Heineken) or dark and stormys. Food is BYO, or order from a nearby restaurant and have it launched over to the floating clubhouse.

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Battery Park

The Irish American

The owner of Liam's and Dark Horse is behind this Irish pub. Choose from 30 draft beers and comfort-food plates, like shepherd's pie and Jameson-chipotle buffalo wings.

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Battery Park

Keg No. 229 (CLOSED)

Critics' pick

Set back from the foot traffic of touristy South Street Seaport, this sleek watering hole is a beer lover’s retort to the grapecentric Bin No. 220 across the road. Thankfully, the fancy wallpaper and reclaimed-wood tables doesn’t translate to inflated prices—most selections from the East Coast–leaning draft lineup (Flying Dog, Southern Tier) are fairly pegged at $6 each, while well-chosen craft cans (Oskar Blues Old Chub, 21st Amendment Back in Black) go for $5. It’s all rather civilized, until you find yourself at one of the four pour-your-own stations in the back—high-top tables with two beer taps that allow you to top off freely and track your consumption via an LED screen. With a chalk leaderboard glorifying the biggest boozers, it's tough to avoid to urge to go for broke.

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Financial District

The Libertine

Packed with hangdog bankers, Todd English’s mediocre gastropub restaurant is a clichéd finance man’s haunt. While the pub pie, featuring a harissa-laced crust and fork-tender lamb, was simple and satisfying, other dishes felt like overkill. The signature burger was hyperaccessorized with too many toppings, and fried “carpetbagger” oysters would have been fine without the extraneous addition of raw beef. Regressive recession indulgences rule the dessert menu—see the very McDonald’s fried apple turnover—and not in a good way.

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Financial District

Lilly O'Brien's

This straightforward Irish pub has a standard selection of 13 beers on tap and a number of TVs on which to watch local sports. Its party room occasionally plays host to comedy shows.

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Financial District

Living Room Bar & Terrace

Wall Streeters have a new option for after-work martinis: this fifth-floor bar in the W Hotel. Mixologist Charlotte Voisey crafts cocktails named for the neighborhood: The Five Points blends pisco with muddled pineapple and arugula, while the Brooklyn Bridge blends rye, bitters and blood-orange liqueur. Bar bites include a bacon and arugula pizza and grilled spicy octopus.

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Financial District

Meade’s

An ocean-fresh raw bar and icy microbrews, not Styrofoam buckets of suds, rule at this upscale offshoot of nearby dive Jeremy’s. Lunching businessmen pack the upstairs lounge to munch half-pound burgers, oysters and po’ boys at paper-topped tables, which are equipped with crayons for sudden inspiration. After dark, easygoing locals rule the slender downstairs bar, downing Dogfish Head and Lone Star brew and playing Connect Four beneath lazily spinning ceiling fans.

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Financial District

Nelson Blue

If the idea of dining in the tourist-laden South Street Seaport with a kid in tow makes you weak in the knees (and not in a good way), check out this gem of a restaurant. Just slightly off the beaten cobblestoned path, Nelson Blue serves fantastic New Zealand–style grub in a beautiful space: You'll feel like a Kiwi yourself, surrounded by all the native tribal decor. Kids gravitate toward the traditional lamb and pork skewers and finger-friendly sides like zucchini-and-corn fritters and french fries with herb salt.

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Financial District

The Porterhouse at Fraunces Tavern

Critics' pick

This Revolutionary-era tavern now operates as the first stateside outpost of Dublin’s Porterhouse Brewing Company. Tangles of filament bulbs above the bar and distressed mirrors on the walls smack of artificial ye-oldeness, but the real pedigree of the place still holds appeal for beer-swilling history buffs, who can geek out over the thought of George Washington drinking here in the 1700s. Hoist imperial pints of Porterhouse’s own brews—we like the smooth, slightly tangy Oyster Stout and the easy-drinking Porterhouse Red—or sample the globe-trotting selection of guest beers, including Victory Prima Pils on tap and bottles of Schlenkerla smoked beer.

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Financial District

Romi

The owner of Soho’s Naked Lunch has scored another success, close to Ground Zero but with an uptown feel. Everything's huge, so there’s plenty of downstairs seating (bar, booths, high tables, wraparound couch). But the upstairs lounge is the magnet: black leather armchairs, low tables and a DJ booth to pump deep house beats over the bar, Wednesday through Saturday. A light tapas menu is offered until 11pm. Few places have opened in this area in the last few years; this one has locals raving.

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Financial District

SmorgasBar

Smorgasburg expands with a boozy seasonal offshoot at the South Street Seaport, outfitted with a 300-seat beer garden and eight ’burg vendors. From Memorial Day weekend through October, a dozen market favorites—including Brooklyn Oyster Party, Asia Dog, Landhaus and Pizza Moto—hawk their goods at a Front Street marketplace. Two makeshift bars—set inside and atop old shipping containers—service the 300-seat beer garden, pouring brews like Captain Lawrence Kölsch and Sixpoint Sweet Action, as well as wines and cocktails. Bartenders fizz up vodka, tequila, bourbon or rum with Brooklyn Soda Works pop (grapefruit-jalapeño-honey). Slushies from Kelvin Natural Slush Co. also get spiked with hooch for an adult icy treat.

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Financial District

SouthWest NY

It’s in New York, but doesn’t feel of New York. The windows overlook a Hudson River view that resembles San Diego more than our own bustling metropolis. Much of the crowd comes from the nearby Financial District or is here on business, so prices for specialty margaritas, Mexican beers and appetizers tend to be expense-account high. But during the summer, it’s wonderful to be near the promenade and sailboat-dotted marina.

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Financial District

Stone Street Tavern

Brokers’ fresh-pressed shirts and shiny leather shoes rule at this downtown alehouse, located on a quaint cobblestone block in the Financial District. After the markets close, the weathered wood floors get further scuffed by martini sippers and Coors Light chuggers, whose boisterous gabbing competes with a circa-1996 soundtrack (hello, Cranberries!). Later on, the bar evolves into a serene spot to grab a pint or lofty pub eats like Parmesan-crusted fries and a beer-battered grouper sandwich with tartar sauce.

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Financial District
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