Learn to swing dance and get fit at these classes

You'll be sure to stand out at one of NYC’s 1920s and 1930s–style parties if you learn to swing dance at these fitness classes.

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  • Photograph: Rick Ochoa

    Beginner and Intermediate Class at Brooklyn Swings

  • Photograph: Allison Michael Orenstein

    Nathan Bugh and Evita Arce, Swing/Lindy Basics at Dance Manhattan

  • Photograph: Lynn Redmile

    Nathan Bugh and Giselle Anguizola, Swing/Lindy Basics at Dance Manhattan

Photograph: Rick Ochoa

Beginner and Intermediate Class at Brooklyn Swings

If you’ve ever stood on the edge of the dance floor at the Jazz Age Lawn Parties on Governors Island, marveling at the couples who know how to move, here’s your chance to learn how to swing dance at one of these basics and beginners’ classes. Sessions tend to begin with solo work to help you get the steps down, then move on to routines with a partner.


RECOMMENDED: Fitness guide to NYC


Beginner and Intermediate Class at Brooklyn Swings

Your initiation into this lively style kicks off with an intro to solo moves in front of a mirror. Once you’ve got the key steps down, you’ll partner up for the real dancing: Couples step, rock-step and side pass for an hour, and alternate between following and leading. You might stumble on fellow twosomes as you work through more complex combinations in this slightly cramped space, but no one seems to mind. When your core and legs are aching, just picture Cat Deeley cheering you on. • The Muse, 32D South 1st St between Kent and Wythe Aves, Williamsburg, Brooklyn (brooklynswings.com). Tue 7–8pm; single class $15, four classes $40.

Swing/Lindy Basics at Dance Manhattan

You’ll get to know your classmates right away in this four-week course: After being paired with an initial partner, you’ll switch off every few minutes. Thighs and calves are tingling by round three as you master triple steps and inside-turn passes. By the fourth class, you’ll have mastered the basics, as well as fancier twists and spins. With your freshly toned legs, you’ll have the confidence to hoof it in social settings, not to mention improved balance. • 39 W 19th St between Fifth and Sixth Aves (212-807-0802, dancemanhattan.com). Thu 7–8pm; single class $25, four-week course $85.

Introductory Swing at Stepping Out Studios

This gratis workshop adds a few salsa moves to the standard swing mix. Anywhere from five to 30 students attend each session, but you’ll usually get plenty of attention. After learning the basics solo, you’ll try more impressive moves like the Suzie-Q and crossover, and you’ll work with partners. Stepping Out’s method combines the slower West Coast style and the faster East Coast variation, though the emphasis changes depending on the teacher. Regardless of the style, the rapid-fire moves not only shred your leg muscles, but also give your lower back and arms a killer workout. • 37 W 26th St between Broadway and Sixth Ave (646-742-9400, steppingoutstudios.com). Fri 8:30–9:30pm; free.


Users say

15 comments
jerry feldman
jerry feldman

clearly you have bridged copyright laws. You need to give credit to Lynn Redmile for that photograph and issue an apology.

Makie Sanchez
Makie Sanchez

Do you ever intend to give Lynn Redmile credit for her photography? Ms Redmile has been photographing the jazz and swing scene for years and not crediting her for this is insulting and disrespectful.

Ed Watz
Ed Watz

Will you please credit Lynn Redmile for her photo, this is very unprofessional of TimeOut and I am surprised that you have not corrected your oversight by now.

Kate
Kate

You have not properly credited Lynn Redmile as the photographer of the 3rd photo. Not properly crediting an artist for their work is beyond the pale, please show a little respect for Ms. Redmile and fix this immediately.

Charles Herold
Charles Herold

You've been getting comments about the lack of a credit for Lynn Redmile's photo for three days and you still haven't fixed it? WTF?

Charles Herold
Charles Herold

You've been getting comments about the lack of a credit for Lynn Redmile's photo for three days and you still haven't fixed it? WTF?

Jed
Jed

You are using an uncredited Lynn Redmile photo. Please fix.

Marta
Marta

My friends and I noticed that Lynn Redmile was not credited for HER amazing photography, and that her watermark was cropped out. Shame on you Timeout. Shame on you... I expected better of you.

BS
BS

Just wanted to let you know that this is BS. As Grant Hill would say, "It's not cool, it's not funny, and you're better than that." Let the essence of what is not complete your attempts.

Pops
Pops

Don't most publications give photographer credit on copyrighted photos?

KR
KR

WOAH...Where is the credit for Lynn Redmile?? Not cool Time Out. Someone from there, needs a time out. Please make sure this lovely and talented women is given credit, where credit is due.

Mike Wartell
Mike Wartell

Where are your ethics with the 3rd photo?

rqd
rqd

Must echo KC's comment: great photo, but is it your policy not to credit or otherwise acknowledge the photographer?

DG
DG

As an artist and New Yorker, I'm appalled that the photo of Nathan Bugh and Evita Arce for this article is an uncredited photo from a fellow artist named Lynn Redmile that has been cropped to remove her watermark. I wouldn't have expected such a low class move from Time Out, but now I know better. Shame on you.

KC
KC

I noticed that Lynn Redmile was not credited for her gorgeous photography, and that her watermark was cropped out. What a shame, she's an amazing photographer and artist.