Arts & Entertainment

Your complete guide to Singapore's art exhibitions, theatre plays, musicals, comedy, movie reviews and film trailers

Singapore International Photography Festival
Art

Singapore International Photography Festival

The biennial Singapore International Photography Festival (SIPF) was the first of its kind when it premiered in 2008, and this year’s fifth edition promises to showcase even more works by South-East Asian artists

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Alternative and interactive theatre companies in Singapore
Theatre

Alternative and interactive theatre companies in Singapore

We discover three theatre troupes that are taking their performances off the stage and into pop-up venues around the city

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Best public art in Singapore
Art

Best public art in Singapore

We introduce the artists who are decking out our land-starved city with public art

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Interview: Wong Maye-E
Art

Interview: Wong Maye-E

We pick the brain of Wong Maye-E, a photographer who has been chronicling life in North Korea since 2014

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Interview: Tan Ai Leng
Film

Interview: Tan Ai Leng

Before Tan Ai Leng’s 'My Love Sinema' hits the theatres, we quiz the filmmaker on the flick, her inspirations and what’s it like being a woman in a male-dominated industry

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Latest film reviews and releases

Blair Witch
Film

Blair Witch

If there is any film whose lightning would seem impossible to recapture in a bottle, it’s ‘The Blair Witch Project’. The shaky-cam, DIY-ish, you-are-there techniques that made the 1999 horror so frightening and immediate have passed into cliché. None of us would fall for the original marketing campaign’s ‘It really happened!’ pitch either. So it’s a small miracle that 17 years later ‘Blair Witch’ – essentially a sequel-as-remake (let’s ignore 2000’s ‘Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2’) – is satisfying in its own right and pretty damn scary. Director Adam Wingard and screenwriter Simon Barrett (‘The Guest’) reference the pervasiveness of homemade footage by opening on a website. Newly discovered video footage, apparently of original victim Heather, has been posted. Her brother James (James Allen McCune) heads back into Maryland’s Black Hills Forest in search of his long-lost sister, joined by film student Lisa (Callie Hernandez) and a couple of buddies. They’re kitted out with high-tech cameras including GoPros and even a drone. With all this technology in their hands, there’s no way they can get lost, right?  Wingard and Barrett briefly acknowledge the prior movie’s legacy, but they mostly devote themselves to rerunning its scenario with the dial turned up to 11. With a few new wrinkles worked into the mythology (there’s a nasty, literal twist on those creepy stick figures), the experience proceeds from disorienting to anxious to full-on, hurtling, gasp-inducing panic. (If

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Bridget Jones's Baby
Film

Bridget Jones's Baby

Clever old Bridget. There’s been a hell of a lot criticism of her for crimes against feminism. But here she is, triumphantly returning in her forties, less of a twit, funnier, wittier, and – perhaps most importantly – happier with herself. And unlike the last film in the series, ‘The Edge of Reason’, you don’t need to knock back several large glasses of chardonnay for this film to make you laugh. ‘Bridget Jones’s Baby’ picks up a few years after her relationship with Mark Darcy went pear-shaped. (If you’ve read Helen Fielding’s novel ‘Mad About the Boy’ – the one that bumped off Darcy – ignore it. Pretend it doesn’t exist). Bridge is now 43 and single. But instead of crying into her cardigan about dying alone and being eaten by Alsatians, she has thrown herself into her brilliant career as a top TV news producer. (Honestly, she can even pronounce the names of obscure genocidal dictators). Her mates have all settled down and babied-up, so she’s got a new best friend, hard-partying millennial Miranda (Sarah Solemani from the British sitcom ‘Him and Her’). After declaring that she’s past her sexual sell-by date, Bridget has two drunken one-night stands and finds herself unexpectedly up the duff. Is the dad emotionally constipated Mark Darcy (Colin Firth)? Or sexy American billionaire Jack (Patrick Dempsey)? The script is a team effort by Dan Mazer (who’s worked with Sacha Baron Cohen), Helen Fielding and Emma Thompson, who writes herself a hilarious role as a sharp-tongued do

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Sully
Film

Sully

Clint Eastwood doesn't waste any time: the opening scenes of 'Sully', his stirring tribute to a great day of ultra-coordinated New York City heroism, are so frightening that it’s amazing they're about to play in multiplexes around the world. In the cockpit of his US Airways jet, Chesley 'Sully' Sullenberger (Tom Hanks, easing deeper into his Jimmy Stewart phase after 'Bridge of Spies') sees both his plane engines flame out. Scanning the horizon, he veers towards Manhattan. It’s the wrong move. He calls his wife (Laura Linney) to tell her he loves her. The plane goes down in the city, tearing through skyscrapers in a familiar fireball.   Of course, it’s just a nightmare, only in the mind of the man who, after saving all his 155 passengers by spectacularly landing on the Hudson River (beautifully staged later in a terrific action sequence), went back to his hotel to try to sleep it off. But this pushy scene is also the film's way of shocking us into respectful submission: it could have been so much worse, so let’s not get into any complexities.   Eastwood has never been apologetic about his sincerity – he grabs at emotions that lesser filmmakers would be embarrassed to attempt. But even as recently as 'American Sniper', he’s done a much better job than this of shading in the greys of what constitutes heroism. 'Sully' is so square, it’s a wonder it even gets airborne.   Hanks’s walking iceberg never thaws; the actor is never as vulnerable as he was in 'Captain Phillips'. A

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Morgan
Film

Morgan

Does artificial intelligence pose a danger to the future of humans? Will it all go pear-shaped for people? In evolutionary terms, are we the gorillas to the machines’ humans? Anxiety about AI has been the subject of many films recently: from ‘Her’ to ‘Ex Machina’. Now comes ‘Morgan’, a Frankenstein-like tale for the twenty-first century, directed by Luke Scott (son of ‘Blade Runner’ director Ridley Scott). The monster in this sci-fi fable is Morgan, who looks like a little girl, but is actually a new form of life – a human-AI hybrid developed by a mega-corporation for unspecified weapons purposes. Scott has assembled a cracking cast, and the build-up is incredibly sinister – despite some distracting cardboard dialogue. Kate Mara, channelling Jodie Foster in ‘The Silence of the Lambs’, plays Lee Weathers, the company’s risk evaluator. Lee is sent to a creepy-looking house where a group of scientists (played by Toby Jones and Jennifer Jason Leigh among others) have developed Morgan, who is five years old, but already the size of a teenager and starting to show signs of having kinetic powers. Morgan has also just stabbed one of her minders in the face with a pen, ripping out an eyeball, hence Mara’s arrival, with Paul Giamatti in tow as a psychiatrist. The scientists are devoted to their ‘little breakthrough’: they treat Morgan as a child, even though they’re supposed to call her ‘it’. Is she equally attached to them? Or, like a cat, is she exploiting their pathetic human need t

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Pete's Dragon
Film

Pete's Dragon

What to watch this summer if you’re too scared to make it past episode two of ‘Stranger Things’? The answer is Disney’s ‘Pete’s Dragon’, about an orphaned boy who lives in the forest with his pet dragon (it’s remake of a 1977 film). With ‘Pete’s Dragon’ you get the nostalgic Spielberg-y-ness of ‘Stranger Things’, minus the creepy kids with paranormal nosebleeds. It begins with little Pete’s mum and dad being killed in a car crash. Pete is unhurt, but is about to become boy-mince for wolves when he’s rescued by a dragon. Skip ahead six years, and he’s having the time of his life with his adorable mutt of a dragon – a great big lummoxy cuddle monster of green fur. Of course, it can’t last, and Pete feels the call of civilisation when he meets a nice forest warden (Bryce Dallas Howard). This being a kids film, there is a ‘message’ – about the destruction of nature. But the eco theme genuinely works with the film’s wonder at nature. And great news for wusses: the scariest creature in this forest is a dragon more likely to chase his tail than breathe fire.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Nerve
Film

Nerve

A shy student gets drawn into an online reality dare game in this cyberthriller based on the 2012 young-adult novel by Jeanne Ryan. Emma Roberts stars as teenager Vee, who is goaded into trying out the app, in which an underground community of players perform dares in return for cash. This proves to be surprisingly lucrative for Vee, though she’s actually more interested in impressing fellow player Ian (Dave Franco), a guy she partners up with one night in New York City. Mild challenges such as ‘kiss a stranger’ escalate to life-threatening tests like ‘motorbike blindfolded’. Then things go too far. As for the machinations of the game itself, what begins as faintly unlikely becomes flat-out preposterous, but there’s entertainment value along the way. Directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman (‘Catfish’) make the most of the suspenseful set-up, and Vee has enough likeability that you’ll be rooting for her. Roberts and Franco share chemistry, while Emily Meade is enjoyable in the slutty-best-friend role (though poor Juliette Lewis is wasted in another anxious-mom part). Other films – including David Fincher’s ‘The Game’ – have done this better. But with its engaging story, energetic soundtrack and slick production values, ‘Nerve’ is an easy watch.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Top art museums and galleries in Singapore

National Gallery Singapore
Art

National Gallery Singapore

The former City Hall and Supreme Court buildings have been refurbished to become the National Gallery

Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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STPI Creative Workshop and Gallery
Art

STPI Creative Workshop and Gallery

A dynamic creative workshop and contemporary art gallery 

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ArtScience Museum
Art

ArtScience Museum

Art and science coexist in the same space at Marina Bay Sands

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Objectifs Centre for Photography & Filmmaking
Film

Objectifs Centre for Photography & Filmmaking

Regular courses and workshops at this filmmaking and photography hub

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MINT Museum of Toys
Things to do

MINT Museum of Toys

A private museum with the largest collection of vintage toys in Southeast Asia

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Singapore Art Museum
Art

Singapore Art Museum

20th-century Asian visual art housed in a colonial building

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