Arts & Entertainment

Your complete guide to movie reviews and film trailers, theatre plays, musicals, comedy, art exhibitions and more in Singapore

Art

Singapore's best public art

Art and sculptures in the city that are perfect for Instagrams

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Art

Virtual art galleries in Singapore

View art on your iPad

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Film

The best alternative cinemas in Singapore

For serious movie buffs: Not your mainstream cinemas 

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Film

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1

The third film of the series picks up right after Katniss was rescued from the Quarter Quell games

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Art

Top art galleries in Singapore

The best white spaces to see some art

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Art and theatre events

Dim Sum Dollies: The History of Singapore

The beloved trio is back with the second installment of their History of Singapore saga, with Denise Tan taking the place of late, great Emma Yong as they take us through the decades from the 1960s all the way up to the present day. Read our interview with Denise Tan, the newest member of the Dollies. Parental guidance is advised for children under the age of 16 due to the socio-political references in the play.

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Art

The Earlier Mona Lisa

Explore your way through nine galleries that present the rediscovery of the painting in 1913 England

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Peter Pan - The Never Ending Story

Fly away to Neverland with songs by Robbie Williams, Westlife, Josh Groban and more

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Art

Ran Hwang: Becoming Again

The Korean artist uses the humble button as her chosen medium to build incredible, immersive installations.

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Art

Beyond the Grid

This group exhibition features prints and paper-making techniques that defy stereotypical contemporary Chinese aesthetics.

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Art

Ore Huiying: We are Farmers

This photo exhibition is the local artist’s documentation of her family’s farm, which has been in business for more than three generations.

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Latest film reviews and releases

Film

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

‘The Defining Chapter’ declare the posters for this wrap-up episode in Peter Jackson’s trilogy of ‘The Lord of the Rings’ prequels, the last of three films stretched from JRR Tolkien's one novel, 'The Hobbit'. Exactly what’s being defined is left conveniently vague, because what we have here is a whole lot more of Jackson’s proven formula: more battles, more creatures, more not-quite-comical asides, more stern speechifying and more gob-smackingly elaborate action set pieces. If you’ve been enjoying ‘The Hobbit’ so far, you’re in for a treat. But if you were hoping for something extra or different this time around – a touch of honest emotion, perhaps –  then ‘The Battle of the Five Armies’ may leave you wanting.We pick up the story right where ‘The Desolation of Smaug’ cut to black: the dragon is on the rampage, and all Bilbo (Martin Freeman) and his Dwarvish companions can do is watch as the lizard lays waste to Laketown. It’s a phenomenal opening, thunderous and apocalyptic, pitching us into the heart of a city on fire. But when the smoke clears the script begins to lose focus, as what seems like every single character in the trilogy so far (bar one slimy riddler) comes crawling out of the stonework. While Thorin (Richard Armitage) indulges his lust for gold to the frustration of bowman Bard (Luke Evans) and elf-king Thranduil (Lee Pace), Gandalf recruits a few old pals to assist in his escape from the dungeons of Dul Guldur. In the confusion, poor Bilbo feels more like a su

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Film

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

This adaptation of a popular 1970s children’s book is brisk and buoyant, if slapdash – a series of well-executed vignettes that you wish added up to more. The basic premise remains: 12-year-old Alexander (Ed Oxenbould) has a terrible day at home and school while the rest of his family have a great one. But before the life lesson (that everyone has bad days) can be learned, Alexander makes an early birthday wish: let my parents and siblings know just how awful things can get. The next morning, Alexander’s unemployed dad (Steve Carell) is running late for his job interview, his harried mum (Jennifer Garner) is dealing with major crises at work, and siblings Anthony (Dylan Minnette) and Emily (Kerris Dorsey) have their plans go spectacularly awry. Kids can come to ‘Alexander…’ for the broad slapstick and bodily functions; adults can groove to the clever Dick Van Dyke cameo and inspired drops of songs by INXS and the Feelies. The movie’s admirable energy, however, doesn’t hide an overall sense of slightness that prevents this from being a family classic.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Film

Interstellar

Christopher Nolan’s overwhelming, immersive and time-bending space epic ‘Interstellar’ makes Alfonso Cuarón’s ‘Gravity’ feel like a palate cleanser for the big meal to come

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Film

Nightcrawler

Jake Gyllenhaal gives a careet best performance in this savagely brilliant media satire

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Film

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1

‘Mockingjay – Part 1’ goes deeper and darker

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

Serena

It’s third time unlucky for Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper. The Hollywood A-team is back with a C+ movie. ‘Serena’ isn’t terrible, but it’s no ‘American Hustle’ or ‘Silver Linings Playbook’. To be fair to J-Coop, they act their socks off. And this must have looked like a winner on paper: an intense drama about a couple who bully and murder their way to the top of the lumber industry in 1930s Colorado, adapted from a bestseller and directed by Oscar winner Susanne Bier.But, somehow, ‘Serena’ has turned out about as intense as queuing for the self-checkout tills in Sainsbury’s. Cooper is George Pemberton, a smug timber baron who proposes to femme fatale Serena (Lawrence) the moment he claps eyes on her. If the Pembertons were alive today, you’d be rushing to sign your name to a petition on Change.org to stop them in their tracks. They want to make their fortune stripping the North Carolina mountains of trees, never mind the hellish conditions for their workers, whose limbs go flying off into the woods at horrifyingly frequent intervals. Serena is the ruthless brains behind the operation, a natural-born businesswoman with a bit of murderous bitch thrown in. You get the sense that director Susanne Bier can’t decide what to do with Serena. In places she’s a feminist, riding around the mountain in jodhpurs and showing the men how to chop down a tree like you mean it. But when she finds out she can’t bear children she goes off-the-leash loony. We don’t invest anything in eithe

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Top art museums and galleries in Singapore

Art

Singapore Art Museum

This former Catholic boys’ school, a striking white building with two wings and long verandas, was revamped in the early 1990s when there was a policy of converting old colonial buildings into public museums. Because of its small, unusual and hidden gallery spaces, it has never held blockbuster shows. Instead, it specialises in smaller exhibitions, mostly 20th-century Asian visual art, often drawn from its own collection of South-east Asian ‘pioneer’ art. Free entrance on Fridays after 6pm

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Things to Do

red dot design museum

  An offshoot of the famous red dot museum in Germany, the largest exhibition of contemporary design in the world, this local version displays the prototypes and models made by winners of the prestigious red dot product design awards. Housed in a bright red colonial building that was the former Singapore Traffic Police Headquarters, the museum displays interactive installations and products such as unconventional furniture, watches and TV sets.

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Art

FOST Gallery

Since its establishment in 2006, FOST Gallery has built a reputation as one of Singapore's more innovative galleries, presenting works by both established and emerging artists from Singapore and abroad.

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Things to Do

The Cathay Gallery

Ever wondered why the Cathay Building, with its mish-mash of ’30s art-deco frontage and avant-garde glass body, looks like it was designed by a mentalist architect with schizophrenia? You can find out at the perenially unsung Cathay Gallery, housed in a quiet, out-of-the-way corner on the second floor, which colourfully relates the rocky past of the 75-year-old entertainment giant that is Cathay, as well as its founders Dr Loke Yew and his son, Dato Loke Wan Tho. Check out the short documentary about the plane crash which killed Dato Loke, and browse through heaps of retro movie memorabilia. Film diehards will no doubt go gaga at the super-rare antique film projector at the entrance, while within the gallery, old photo enlargers, cinema chairs, vintage movie posters and other oddball silver-screen curios and Technicolor nostalgia make for a diverting hour before catching a somewhat more contemporary cinema experience upstairs. Tip: Catch the black-and-white trailer for the Cathay-produced smash-hit Malay horror flick from 1957, Pontianak. Seah Jun En See more: The best things in life are free Latent Images: Film in Singapore

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Art

ArtScience Museum

Shoehorning art and science into the same room and doing justice to both was always going to be a big risk (although we could think of bigger – who wouldn’t want to spend an afternoon at the ReligionScience Museum?). Right from the get-go, the concept, with its strong ring of focus-grouped marketability, invites cynicism and excitement in almost equal measure. Is this, you wonder, the arrival of a museum thinking well and truly outside the box? Or is it, as some have reckoned, another hole in the foot of a city trying ever harder to better itself with another catchy but ultimately hollow niche-filler? Another empty, world-beating superlative to add to the list? As it turns out, the answer is a bit of both. The permanent exhibition – that’s the ArtScience showcase on the top floor – is surprising for its brevity and, after all the hype, a bit of a letdown. Three rooms make a glib attempt to tackle the ‘conceptual barriers erected between the artistic and scientific communities’. The Inspiration room asks: what do an ancient Chinese scroll, Leonardo’s flying machine, a robo-fish, a Kongmin lantern and the ArtScience Museum itself have in common? You leave without ever really finding out, other than they were invented by very creative minds. But you do get to play with touch screens and, if you so desire, create a digital postcard to send to mum. The Expression room, a large, multi-panelled cinema, screams ‘Look, art and science can co-exist!’ with a short video montage

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Film

Objectifs Centre for Photography & Filmmaking

This filmmaking and photography hub was established in 2003 and has already garnered a huge following of enthusiasts wanting to further their knowledge in either craft. Besides holding regular courses and workshops, they also create awareness by organising photography exhibitions, film screenings and talks. And if that’s not enough, this establishment spearheads Objectif Films in partnership with Infinite Frameworks and Shooting Gallery Asia. Together, they distribute the largest number of short films in South-East Asia and represent award-winning short films from our region.

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