Arts & Entertainment

Your complete guide to movie reviews and film trailers, theatre plays, musicals, comedy, art exhibitions and more in Singapore

Film

Interview: George Lucas

Lucas tells us about his new film, 'Strange Magic'

Read more
Art

Three places to learn art in Singapore

Continue your exploration of the art world after Art Week

Read more
Comedy

Interview: Bill Burr

The American comedian on his life, love and laughs

Read more
Art

'Moving Light, Roving Sight' by teamLab

An immersive digital installation

Read more
Art

Ruben Pang

More about local artist Ruben Pang's latest exhibition, Ataraxy

Read more

Art and theatre events

Tartuffe

The master of the house, Orgon, invites the pious Tartuffe to stay with his family. Enchanted by Tartuffe’s good nature, Orgon offers the newcomer his daughter’s hand in marriage – but the rest of his family can see through Tartuffe’s wiles and guiles. And now, they have to find a way to convince Orgon of their suspicions. The play was written by French playwright Molière, and is now translated and performed by Nine Years Theatre in Chinese with English subtitles.

Read more

Make It New

Local dance company Arts Fission celebrates its 20th anniversary with a ten-day event that incorporates elements of dance, design and discussion. Find out more about Make It New here.

Read more
Art

Jacques Villeglé: Retrospective

The renowned 88-yearold French mixed media artist showcases more than 50 artworks, dating from the 1960s to early 2000s. Villeglé’s works are created using the technique of décollage, in which images are placed on top of one another before being torn away to reveal the layers beneath.

Read more

Rooted - A Triple Bill

The Singapore Hokkien Huay Kuan Dance Theatre’s second tentpole production features works by four choreographers – including Neo Jenny, Benedict Soh, Anthony Meh and Aman Yap – who are inspired by their Chinese heritage and roots.

Read more
Art

Urban Art

Featuring sculptures and other artworks that bridge the gap between nature and industry, a series of works are displayed along Orchard Road and in the gallery. Participating artists include Yi Chul Hee, Pierre Matter, Blek Le Rat, and Shepard Fairey, among others.

Read more
Art

Billy Mork: Horses’ Home Sweet Home

The images by this local photographer capture white horses in their natural habitats in Northern Mongolia and Southern France, highlighting the animals’ bold, sturdy and charming characteristics.

Read more

Latest film reviews and releases

Film

A Most Violent Year

In little over three years and three features, American writer-director JC Chandor has launched himself into the rare company of uncompromising filmmakers with more than superheroes on the brain. 'Margin Call' (2011), filled with gloriously terse business talk, got him Oscar-nominated. 'All is Lost' (2013) had virtually no talk, but managed to distill the loner essence of its star, Robert Redford, like no one had before. Now, 'A Most Violent Year', Chandor’s absorbing no-bull New York period drama, further clarifies what might be the most promising career in American movies: an urban-headed filmmaker sparing with time and place and with an eye on the vacant throne of the late, great Sidney Lumet ('Serpico', 'Dog Day Afternoon').Set in the chilly winter of 1981 (evoked with a minimum of perms and trench coats), the movie starts with a business deal, as Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac, absorbingly anxious), an independent gas-company owner, hopes to close with some Hasidim for a precious piece of waterfront property. He leaves the meeting with 30 days to come up with an astronomical sum of money, and it's right at that moment that his problems mushroom: a politically-minded city attorney (David Oyelowo) starts breathing down his neck with aggressive financial queries; Abel’s Brooklyn-born wife, Anna (Jessica Chastain), daughter of a gangster, grows fidgety; and his gas trucks keep getting hijacked on the road.The municipal stew is dense and unusually flavoursome, of a kinship with Ja

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

The Imitation Game

Hidden codes, secret meanings and mixed messages pulse through the reliable, old-fashioned, buzzing copper wires of true-life British period drama ‘The Imitation Game’. Snappy and not too solemn, but perhaps not as much of a psychological puzzle as it could have been, the film gives us key episodes in the tragic life of Alan Turing. He was the mathematician whose biting, anti-social intelligence briefly ran in step with the needs of the British war effort in the 1940s when he was employed to help break the Nazi Enigma code at Bletchley Park. Turing’s wartime achievements – kept under wraps for years – counted for nothing when his homosexuality fell foul of the law in the early 1950s, sending an already fragile personality into freefall. Benedict Cumberbatch, no stranger to roles with a hint of sociopathic genius, delivers a performance more complicated and knottier than the film around him. The script tends to spell out its themes, repeating a corny slogan: ‘Sometimes it is the people who no one imagines anything of, who do the things that no one can imagine.’ Cumberbatch, though, defies the film’s simplicity. His Turing is awkward, determined, at times comically stand-offish (a description that could just as easily apply to his Stephen Hawking, Julian Assange and Sherlock Holmes). The film gives us three periods in Turing’s life: his schooldays, wartime service and final years in the early 1950s. We intermittently hear Turing on voiceover telling his life story to a suspic

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

American Sniper

Only a filmmaker like Clint Eastwood – conservative, patriotic but alive and sensitive to human tragedy – could make a movie about an Iraq War veteran and fill it with doubts, mission anxiety and personal tragedy. ‘American Sniper’ is a superbly subtle critique made by an especially young 84-year-old. Like ‘The Hurt Locker’, it salutes the honest work of soldiers, in this case Navy Seals, shivering through their beach training and heading to the battle zone with a minimum of fuss. Among them is Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper), the real-life Texas rodeo rider who, after seeing terrorism on TV, transformed himself into the military’s most lethal weapon, racking up a confirmed 160 kills. But it’s what happens to Kyle back home – the shakes, the soaring blood pressure, the family dysfunction – that makes the film one of the most sympathetic combat movies ever produced. Bulked up yet still able to express his signature neuroticism (dialled down from ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ and ‘American Hustle’), Cooper has never been better than when embracing Kyle’s seesawing psychological state. The story ends on a terrible irony, which Eastwood slightly bungles with pageantry, but the overall mood is haunted.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

Birdman

‘Most of the successful people in Hollywood are failures as human beings.’ So said Marlon Brando. But what happens when their 15 minutes are up? It’s not like failure suddenly transforms former mega-celebs into humble human beings who can pick up their own coffee from Starbucks. That's Michael Keaton’s problem in this savagely funny, strangely sweet, sad and utterly brilliant New York-set comedy from Mexican writer-director Alejandro González Iñárritu, better known for his gloomy, state-of-the world dramas 'Babel' and '21 Grams'.Keaton is Riggan Thomson, an actor who raked in the cash in the early 1990s as a lame pre-‘Avengers’ superhero in a blockbuster franchise (a clear nod to Keaton's own days as Batman). He hasn’t made a Birdman film in years – but Birdman is still part of him. Quite literally: there's a naff, booming comic voice in his head (‘You're the real deal’), and it gives him superhuman powers. Is Birdman a figment of Riggan's imagination? Is this a dig at superstar actors with inflated egos who have trouble telling the difference between real-life and their movie characters? Whatever it is, Riggan has problems. He’s trying to reinvent himself for a second act as a Serious Artist, remortgaging the house in Malibu to write, direct and star in an adaptation of a Raymond Carver short story on Broadway. But Birdman is shitting on the plan, telling Riggan to make a reality TV show instead of this ‘piece of shit’.'Birdman' is hilarious simply as a film about putting on

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

The Theory of Everything

At its best, this affecting biopic of the cosmos-rattling astrophysicist Stephen Hawking (Eddie Redmayne) smartly avoids schmaltz. Hawking has often seen the dark humour in the disease that began robbing him of his muscular functions as early as his student years. ‘The Theory of Everything’ runs with that irony: this is a Hawking profile in which you’ll see the wheelchair-using, speech-impaired scientist happily rolling around his living room dressed up like a Dalek.More substantially, it’s also a movie that delivers science in an approachable, Brian Cox-like way. An early scene has a thoughtful professor introducing the Cambridge student to a lab where all the action happens; it’s a lovely moment of quiet inspiration. The film is filled with snazzy visual metaphors: a swirling cup of coffee becomes a symbol for dark and light matter. A formal dance, where Stephen twirls with his future wife, Jane (Felicity Jones), twinkles with party lights and a hint of the universe falling into place.The film is Jane and Stephen’s story (the script is largely based on the second of Jane Hawking’s two memoirs), and even though it smooths out some of their domestic unease and eventual divorce, there’s still a painful strain below the surface, from playful sparring over religion to the tougher realities of ambitions put on ice. Both performers are extraordinary, and while Redmayne has more physical mannerisms to master, Jones burns hotter as a strong woman who can’t forget her own needs.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

Mr Turner

Twice before, first with 'Topsy-Turvy' and then with 'Vera Drake', Mike Leigh has punctuated his bittersweet studies of contemporary life with period dramas. Now, with 'Mr Turner', the British director of 'Naked' and 'Secrets and Lies' takes us back to the nineteenth century and the later years of the celebrated, groundbreaking, difficult painter JMW Turner (1775-1851). Sad and joyful, 'Mr Turner' offers a wonderfully rich tapestry of experience and digs deeply into a complicated, contradictory life. Timothy Spall – a veteran of Leigh's films – plays this eccentric, determined London bohemian like a bronchial, cantankerous, randy old toad with backache. He grunts and grimaces and gropes his way through life. He talks like a market trader after a crash course in the classics. Leigh, meanwhile, explores Turner's life unburdened by any sense of purpose other than an intense, contagious fascination with this man, his work, his times and, increasingly, the inevitable, slow, irresistible trudge towards death. We observe Turner's fondness for his elderly father; his sexual relationship with his meek housekeeper (Dorothy Atkinson); his rejection of his children and their mother; his arms-length acceptance by the lions of the Royal Academy; his late-life relationship with a Margate widow (Marion Bailey); and the mockery of the crowd when his work turns experimental. 'Vile' and a 'yellow mess' concludes Queen Victoria at an exhibition: the presence of royalty in a Mike Leigh film is ju

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Read more

Top art museums and galleries in Singapore

Things to Do

Peranakan Museum

The world’s largest and best overview of Peranakan life over three floors

Read more
Film

Objectifs Centre for Photography & Filmmaking

Regular courses and workshops at this filmmaking and photography hub

Read more
Art

ArtScience Museum

Art and science coexist in the same space at Marina Bay Sands

Read more
Things to Do

Gillman Barracks

A cluster of galleries take over this former military encampment

Read more
Things to Do

MINT Museum of Toys

A private museum with the largest collection of vintage toys in Southeast Asia

Read more
Art

Singapore Art Museum

20th-century Asian visual art housed in a colonial building

Read more