Arts & Entertainment

Your complete guide to Singapore's art exhibitions, theatre plays, musicals, comedy, movie reviews and film trailers

Theatre

Legends of the Southern Arch

The Theatre Practice celebrates its 50th anniversary with a 'wuxia' production

Read more
Film

History vs Hollywood

We take a look at four upcoming films based on true stories

Read more
Art

PantoneMyArt - Tattoo in Colour 2015

It's a body art-themed exhibition at tcc – The Gallery

Read more
Art

Interview: Ryan Gander

The UK-based artist explains his exhibition to us

Read more
Cinemas

Swanky Silver Screens

Splurge out at these cinemas for a luxe movie-going experience

Read more

Art and theatre events

Triple Bill

See works by three award-winning Asian choreographers, including Taiwanese choreographer Sun Shang-Chi’s Nexus, which he created with local group THE Dance Company; Chinese choreographer Xing Liang’s As Is; and a restaging of Singaporean choreographer Jeffrey Tan’s 2012 performance, Remains Remain. A postshow dialogue with the choreographers will be held on Apr 2.

Read more

Traces IV – Motifs

Weaving the local tradition of firing ceramics in dragon kilns into dance, this double bill by Dance Ensemble Singapore explores the unique Nanyang culture. Featuring dancers from South Korea and Singapore, it is a celebration of our past practices.

Read more
Art

Max Bashev: Special Thanks to…

The Russian artist recreates the works of masters like Vermeer and Da Vinci in a 1980s New York painting style, mixing elements from the past with modern societal issues.

Read more
Art

Ryan Gander

The works of the UK-based artist are composed around visual puzzles and unusually assembled objects, which challenge the way that viewers perceive prints. Ryan Gander explains his art to us.

Read more

Beauty and the Beast

BASE Entertainment and Lunchbox Productions are back with an award-winning musical based on Disney's classic about Belle, a young lady from a provincial town, and Beast, an enchanted prince whose curse can only b broken if he learns to love and be loved.

Read more

Legends of the Southern Arch

Incorporating martial arts and stunt, this wuxla tale about honour, passion and vengeance spans three generations of bloodshed as warriors battle over a secret manual – it enables its owner to dominate the wulin world and remain the realm of martial arts – hidden under the Southern Arch.

Read more

Latest film reviews and releases

Film

Chappie

After the out-of-nowhere sucker punch of his 2009 debut ‘District 9’, Neill Blomkamp’s second film, 2013’s ‘Elysium’, felt like the work of a Hollywood-designed, blockbuster-producing robot: slick and anonymous. So it’s a huge relief to discover that, with ‘Chappie’, the South African filmmaker has re-engaged his emotion chip and ramped up the weirdness factor for this lovably scattergun cybernetic satire. We’re in near-future Johannesburg, where a platoon of faceless android crimefighters have begun the mammoth task of cleaning up the streets. But their inventor (Dev Patel) has greater ambitions: he’s working on the world’s first true artificial intelligence, a computer that can not only think, but create. The result is Chappie, a creature with the body of a killer but the mind of a child. And when Chappie falls into the hands of wannabe gangsters Ninja and Yolandi – played, roughly as themselves, by Afrikaans electroclash duo Die Antwoord – his future is thrown wide open. Will he become a benefit to humanity? Or a menace to society? It would have been easy for Blomkamp to use Chappie as a cipher, a metal shell to be filled with symbolic notions of nature versus nurture, corporate greed and post-human existential angst. But thanks to a wonderful vocal performance from Sharlto Copley, this droid is so much more: he’s adorable, sympathetic and even relatable, a lost soul in a harsh world. ‘Chappie’ the film isn’t so perfect. The plot is threadbare, the nods to ‘RoboCop’ are

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

Fifty Shades of Grey

A watered-down adaptation that hides coyly under the sheets, 'Fifty Shades of Grey' is full of all sorts of sex, but it's still a hopelessly softcore erotic drama that fails to be even a fraction as titillating as the EL James books that inspired it. And yet, strangely, that's exactly why it works.'Fifty Shades' begins with Anastasia Steele (Dakota Johnson, nuanced), a demure college student, arriving for an interview in the office of Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan, stiff), Seattle's most eligible billionaire. It isn't long before the two are bound together like the pages in the spine of a saucy paperback. The virginal Anastasia, however, is in for a surprise: Christian is as kinky as he is rich.Inevitably, this telling of the tale has been neutered to the brink of recognition. Christian is an S&M fetishist, and when Anastasia is invited into her new partner's 'Red Room of Pain', she's confronted by a wonderland of leather, rope and recycled circus equipment. And yet, by the time the movie ends just a few mild spankings later, 'Fifty Shades' feels like going on a trip to Disney World and only riding the monorail.But British director Sam Taylor-Johnson's film becomes fascinating for the finesse with which she navigates the prudishness forced upon it. The director is capable of pivoting from romantic comedy to erotic drama at the crack of a whip, her dexterity allowing the tepid sex scenes to be framed by a surprisingly sensitive story of self-discovery. Substituting heartache

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

Unbroken

Teenage tearaway, 1930s Olympic runner, World War II prisoner-of-war survivor… Why has it taken so long for Hollywood to make a film about the incredible life of Louis Zamperini? Angelina Jolie's third film as a director is a gorgeously shot and hardhitting old-school war drama that’s meant to leave us awestruck by the power of the human spirit. It gets so much right – but still somehow fails to get under Zamperini’s skin.Jack O’Connell’s scrappy underdog energy is perfect for Zamperini, who we meet at 26 in a gripping scene as he shoots at the Japanese from a B-24 bomber in 1943. In flashbacks we see him as a juvenile delinquent, the son of poor Italians, tearing around California. When little Louis, age 13 or so, discovers there’s more to running than dodging cops he quits booze and fags to train with his brother. At the 1936 Berlin Olympics he catches Hitler’s eye as he runs the fastest lap of the 5,000-metres race. Is it his athlete’s iron discipline that keeps Zamperini alive when his plane crashes into the Pacific – and he’s stranded on a raft with two buddies? He puts the trio on rations of two squares of chocolate and three sips of water a day. There’s little variety in these scenes, although in a shift from the usual macho bravado of men bonding at war, Jolie shows us the tenderness of these boys. When one of them gets sick, Zam – as his mates call him – holds his hand, tenderly telling him stories of his ma’s gnocchi.Which is enough drama to fill one life – and one

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

Jupiter Ascending

You have to hand it to Lana and Andy Wachowski: they don’t do things by halves. Fresh from blending dystopian sci-fi, period drama, posh-boy cannibalism and just about everything else under the sun in the gloriously insane ‘Cloud Atlas’, they’ve taken a step backwards, forwards and skywards with this berserk space opera. ‘Jupiter Ascending’ weaves in the messianic elements of ‘The Matrix’, the punch-in-the-eye visual intensity of ‘Speed Racer’ and the fruity performances of ‘Cloud Atlas’ – not to mention random splashes of ‘Dune’, ‘Foundation’, ‘Flash Gordon’, ‘Barbarella’ and ‘Brazil’ – into one breathtaking, mindscrambling, what-the-hell-am-I-watching intergalactic fantasy. It could very well end their careers, but they’ll be going out with one hell of a bang.Mila Kunis plays Jupiter Jones, a Russian immigrant in modern-day Chicago whose workaday life takes an unexpected turn when she becomes an assassination target for scenery-shredding Shakespearean psycho Eddie Redmayne, the universe’s premier power-broker. Whisked to safety by hired hunter Channing Tatum (part wolf, part man, all beefcake) and his amazing anti-grav boots, Jupiter learns that she is the genetic reincarnation of the Queen of the Universe, a title which grants her infinite wealth and the power to control bees for some reason. We’d love to say that the Wachowskis manage to wrangle all these disparate elements into a satisfying whole, but this is one mad mess from start to finish, crammed with flying dinosau

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

A Most Violent Year

In little over three years and three features, American writer-director JC Chandor has launched himself into the rare company of uncompromising filmmakers with more than superheroes on the brain. 'Margin Call' (2011), filled with gloriously terse business talk, got him Oscar-nominated. 'All is Lost' (2013) had virtually no talk, but managed to distill the loner essence of its star, Robert Redford, like no one had before. Now, 'A Most Violent Year', Chandor’s absorbing no-bull New York period drama, further clarifies what might be the most promising career in American movies: an urban-headed filmmaker sparing with time and place and with an eye on the vacant throne of the late, great Sidney Lumet ('Serpico', 'Dog Day Afternoon').Set in the chilly winter of 1981 (evoked with a minimum of perms and trench coats), the movie starts with a business deal, as Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac, absorbingly anxious), an independent gas-company owner, hopes to close with some Hasidim for a precious piece of waterfront property. He leaves the meeting with 30 days to come up with an astronomical sum of money, and it's right at that moment that his problems mushroom: a politically-minded city attorney (David Oyelowo) starts breathing down his neck with aggressive financial queries; Abel’s Brooklyn-born wife, Anna (Jessica Chastain), daughter of a gangster, grows fidgety; and his gas trucks keep getting hijacked on the road.The municipal stew is dense and unusually flavoursome, of a kinship with Ja

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Film

The Imitation Game

Hidden codes, secret meanings and mixed messages pulse through the reliable, old-fashioned, buzzing copper wires of true-life British period drama ‘The Imitation Game’. Snappy and not too solemn, but perhaps not as much of a psychological puzzle as it could have been, the film gives us key episodes in the tragic life of Alan Turing. He was the mathematician whose biting, anti-social intelligence briefly ran in step with the needs of the British war effort in the 1940s when he was employed to help break the Nazi Enigma code at Bletchley Park. Turing’s wartime achievements – kept under wraps for years – counted for nothing when his homosexuality fell foul of the law in the early 1950s, sending an already fragile personality into freefall. Benedict Cumberbatch, no stranger to roles with a hint of sociopathic genius, delivers a performance more complicated and knottier than the film around him. The script tends to spell out its themes, repeating a corny slogan: ‘Sometimes it is the people who no one imagines anything of, who do the things that no one can imagine.’ Cumberbatch, though, defies the film’s simplicity. His Turing is awkward, determined, at times comically stand-offish (a description that could just as easily apply to his Stephen Hawking, Julian Assange and Sherlock Holmes). The film gives us three periods in Turing’s life: his schooldays, wartime service and final years in the early 1950s. We intermittently hear Turing on voiceover telling his life story to a suspic

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more

Top art museums and galleries in Singapore

Things to do

Peranakan Museum

The world’s largest and best overview of Peranakan life over three floors

Read more
Film

Objectifs Centre for Photography & Filmmaking

Regular courses and workshops at this filmmaking and photography hub

Read more
Art

ArtScience Museum

Art and science coexist in the same space at Marina Bay Sands

Read more
Things to do

Gillman Barracks

A cluster of galleries take over this former military encampment

Read more
Things to do

MINT Museum of Toys

A private museum with the largest collection of vintage toys in Southeast Asia

Read more
Art

Singapore Art Museum

20th-century Asian visual art housed in a colonial building

Read more