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Bettmann / GettyQueen Elizabeth II of England at Balmoral Castle with one of her Corgis, 28th September 1952. UPI color slide.

What will happen to the Queen’s corgis now that she has died?

At least two of the dogs will live with her son Prince Andrew and his ex-wife

Ella Doyle
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Ella Doyle
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There are many things the Queen will be remembered for, but fans of her know all about her beloved corgis. She has been pictured over the years with a whole gang of the dogs in tow, clutching a bunch of leashes in one hand. Iconic. 

So how many did she have over the years, and what happens to the Queen’s pups now that she has died? The answer might surprise you. Unless you’re a die-hard fan, you might not know that Queen Elizabeth II actually owned 30 corgis over her 70-year reign (not all at once, mind).

That’s a lot of corgis, and they were all treated like royalty. Every morning, they would accompany her in bed for an Earl Grey tea and a biscuit, apparently, and their food was prepared by royal chefs. They probably ate better than we do. 

At the time of Queen Elizabeth’s death, it’s thought that she owned two corgis named Sandy and Muick, as well as one dorgi (a cross between a dachshund and a corgi) and a cocker spaniel. Today it was confirmed that Sandy and Muick will live with her son Prince Andrew and his ex-wife, Sarah, the Duchess of York. The Duke and his daughters Beatrice and Eugenie had given the Queen the two dogs as a gift in 2021.

Elizabeth (well, her family) got their very first corgi, Dookie, way back in 1933 at the age of seven. She continued to acquire new corgis throughout her life, and they had incredibly comfy lives, sleeping every night in elevated wicker baskets with fresh sheets changed by the Queen herself. Ahh, blissful. It’s not yet known who will be looking after the dorgi and the cocker spaniel, but we hope they love the cuddly fellas as much as she did. 

Read more: here’s everything that will be closed or cancelled following the death of the Queen.

Plus: what will happen to coins, stamps and passports now the Queen has died?

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