Things to Do

Your comprehensive guide to the best things to do in Accra

The Time Out Accra Hot List
Things to do

The Time Out Accra Hot List

Read on for our guide to the week's coolest events and most interesting venues. If you manage to tick off all ten, head back to our home page for daily updates on the best restaurants, cultural events, nightlife, and whatever else Accra manages to think up before our next Hot List is published on Monday.

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The best resorts in Ghana
Hotels

The best resorts in Ghana

It's time for a little bit of luxury in some resorts out of town. These are the best, as voted for in our Rate Your City campaign

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Time Out Meets: H.E. Francois Pujolas
Things to do

Time Out Meets: H.E. Francois Pujolas

 Why were you interested in working in Ghana? What were the cultural aspects you were looking forward to?  For me, Ghana has always been a fascinating country, a reference in Africa for democracy and economic development. As a diplomat, I wanted to work in Ghana to be a part of the process of regional integration in West Africa. Culture can and must play a major role in this regard, for instance on the linguistic side to bridge gaps between French speaking and English speaking countries in this region.   Has it lived up to expectations?  The Ghanaian people are friendly and welcoming; working in Ghana is therefore very interesting and rewarding in terms of interactions and positive thinking. Furthermore the Ghanaian society and economy are open, vibrant and dynamic, and offer many opportunities for partnerships and cooperation. Working and living here is simply great!  Where do you take people out to eat?  Accra is an international city. This reflects in its gastronomic offer: of course it won’t come as a surprise that I like and support the French restaurants in Ghana such as Le Tandem or La Chaumière, and also all those which took part in the ‘Goût/Good France’ event last March. I must admit, I also like to invite my guests to various places and enjoy other cuisines as well: Indian, Japanese, Italian and Ghanaian of course. Some of my favorite restaurants: Urban grill, Santoku, Mamma Mia and the restaurant at the Lou Moon Lodge, Takoradi. We also like homemade Ghanaian

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Asante Treasures: Ghanaian goldweights
Things to do

Asante Treasures: Ghanaian goldweights

From the scales of a 19th-century Asante kingdom chief to a greasy spoon café in Peckham in 2010 is a remarkable journey for a brass goldweight to make. Measuring 2cm x 1.5cm x 1cm, the rectangular cuboid has an abstract pattern that vaguely suggests the sacred Asante Stool. It is embellished with few other decorative qualities. Yet imbued within the scarred metal and finger-worn edges is a story: the power of an Asante chief, decades of turbulent war with the British, a journey through the scrubland of Ghana, a flight to England and, most recently, a trip to a café in Peckham. Partly responsible for the voyage of the artefact is Tom Phillips, a distinguished painter, sculptor, composer, author and avid Ghanaian goldweight collector. Speaking a day before travelling to Berlin to launch his book African Goldweights, he explains the attraction of the weights. “I think they are beautiful objects,” he enthuses over a plate of liver, chips and beans. “They are incredibly delicate, and made using a forgotten method with beeswax. You try making them – it is very complicated”. Although the one now in my hand has a relatively simple design, the weights that were used to weigh gold-dust currency between the 15th and 19th centuries in the Asante Kingdom (and among other parts of the Akan entholinguistic group) come in a vast variety of different styles. The Asante region might have been restricted to West Africa, but a clear Muslim influence can be seen on early designs from the 16t

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75 things to do in Accra and Ghana
Things to do

75 things to do in Accra and Ghana

On New Year's Day 1957, Ghana officially became independent after years of rule by the British, Dutch and Portuguese. In the half-century since, Ghana has become known as the Black Star of Africa – a shining example of a stable and secure post-colonial African country. And nowhere is this more evident than in its vibrant capital. Below is Time Out's celebration of the city, and the country, as we bring you the 50 best things to do in Accra and beyond...

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The best of Accra

Accra's top 7 hotels with swimming pools
Hotels

Accra's top 7 hotels with swimming pools

Deciding on a hotel in Accra? Bear in mind that the city can get hot. Really hot. And while exploring Ghana's capital is incredibly rewarding, sometimes all you'll want to do is laze by a pool in your swimsuit. Take a dip, keep the kids entertained and relax with Time Out's round up of the city's best hotels with pools. And if you're just looking for a place to visit for the day, these pools are available for the use of hotel guests and members of the public alike.

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Accra's best designer hotels
Hotels

Accra's best designer hotels

No matter how impressive a hotel looks from the outside, it's the details that really matter. These are the hotels that get us excited.

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The best bars in Accra
Bars and pubs

The best bars in Accra

There are dozens of bars in Accra, but only these made it into our Rate Your City shortlist. Are these the best? Why not let us know if you disagree

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Accra's best boutiques
Shopping

Accra's best boutiques

From cutting-edge fashion designers making waves around the world to local shops selling the best fabrics and beads, here are the best places to shop

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Accra's 5 essential sights
Things to do

Accra's 5 essential sights

Don't leave Ghana without seeing these sights

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75 things to do in Accra and Ghana • Sights, heritage and history
Things to do

75 things to do in Accra and Ghana • Sights, heritage and history

Take a tour through Ghana's history – and then find read our feature 50 thinsg to do in Accra & Ghana

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Accra's cultural highlights

National Museum of Ghana
Museums

National Museum of Ghana

The National Museum is home to some of Ghana’s most absorbing historical finds. The museum, opened by the Duchess of Kent in 1957, gives an opportunity to travel through the country’s history from both an archaeological and ethnographic perspective. Much of the display is dedicated to indigenous art and crafts: there are regalia, musical instruments and the all-important royal Asante stools. Other displays include Asante gold weights, currency, instruments, textiles and leatherwork. Slighty hidden away is the chair used in Kwame Nkrumah’s inauguration and the chair of the last British governor, rescued from Christianborg Castle. An exhibition about the slave trade is essential viewing, outlining the era’s brutal history, and showing poignant relics such as shackles. There’s also a gallery with pieces by Ghanaian artists.

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WEB Du Bois Memorial Centre
Attractions

WEB Du Bois Memorial Centre

William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was an African-American civil rights activist who became a citizen of Ghana in the 1960s. He was known as the ‘Father of Pan-Africanism’. The centre, where he and his wife once lived, and where they are now buried, houses his personal library, a small museum with a handful of personal effects such as his graduation robes. The couple’s mausoleum is surrounded by Asante stools, a seminar room, a restaurant, a gallery, an amphitheatre and a research centre for Pan-African history and culture.  

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Independence Square and Independence Arch
Attractions

Independence Square and Independence Arch

With modernist and Soviet- influenced lines, the stands around Independence Square can seat 30,000 people. The vast area, built under Kwame Nkrumah, is designed for huge events and military marches, but it is usually empty except for a few soldiers sheltering from the sun. The only times the square comes alive are at commercial events such as concerts and fashion shows, which take place throughout the year. Even if there’s not much happening it’s worth wandering around just to marvel at the sheer audacity of it all.The Independence Arch, at the centre of the busy roundabout, is also known as Black Star Square, thanks to the motif that dominates the arch. The sculpture is a nod to Ghana’s acclaim as the ‘Black Star of Africa’: it was an inspiration to other African countries vying for independence and the Flame of African Liberation, lit by Nkrumah, still burns strongly nearby. Please note that there are (seemingly unwritten) laws about taking photographs and we strongly suggest that you don’t take photographs of any part ofthe area.

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Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park & Mausoleum
Attractions

Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park & Mausoleum

A national park erected in memory of Osagyefo (the Messiah) Doctor Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s first president and one of its founding fathers. Built on a former British polo field, it was the point where Nkrumah declared independence in 1957. The park consists of five acres of land and holds a museum tracing Nkrumah’s life. There are many personal items on display, but the centrepiece is the mausoleum, Nkrumah and his wife’s final resting place. Tours in English can be taken. Kwame Nkrumah is an essential part of Ghana’s history and a good half-hour here will fill you in on most of the details. Events are held on Independence Anniversary celebrations on 6 March and the Celebration of Emancipation Day on 1 August.

Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Where to take kids in Accra

Ci Gusta
Restaurants

Ci Gusta

Ci Gusta, an international franchise bringing a wide array of gelato, frozen yogurt, waffles and many other desserts. This cafe, located conviniently in Airport, provides a perfect place to relax during rush our. Have a late meeting or catch up with friends over a scoop of incredible almond gellato or try their lava cake. Not one for sweet, their savory menu is pretty tasty too! If you're looking for somewhere to take the children, Ci Gusta hosts many afternoon events specifically for them. A must visit in Accra!

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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La Palm Royal Beach

La Palm Royal Beach

La Palm Royal Beach is one the best pool complexes in Ghana, an ideal way to spend a lazy Sunday. Plus there's  La Palm Kids Theme Park, a pleasant and safe enclosed park right by the pool. All pool facilities are open to non-residents; be sure to make use of them!

Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Marvel’s Minigolf
Kids

Marvel’s Minigolf

This is an impressive new minigolf course that will attract fun-loving adults as much as children (there’s a bar after all). The 18-hole golf course has the usual challenges and tricks.

Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Accra Mall
Shopping

Accra Mall

In the courtyard of Accra Mall is a kids playing area with a bouncy castle and a lots of other rides.  

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Kids

Kidz Cottage

This is a remarkable place for children under 12 who love to be spoiled rotten. The large safety-conscious play area is great to expend energy, but the part the little girls tend to love is inside the beauty parlour.

Users say
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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The best weekend escapes

Aqua Safari Resort
Hotels

Aqua Safari Resort

We were rather taken aback by Aqua Safari. It faces out to the estuary of the River Volta, a mile or so upstream from the ocean. From an open-sided restaurant and bar you can see Ghana’s island-dwelling folk crab-fishing and clam-diving in the water. The forward-thinking owners offer guided tours to the islands for boat-building and basket-weaving workshops – there’s also a lot of water to play around in on a jet-ski or one of the pontoons. Game-fishing excursions can be arranged too. Best of all is the option to spend a lazy couple of hours exploring one of the most beautiful areas of Ghana by boat. The whole river environment gives a relaxing and slower pace of life; a stark contrast to Accra two hours away. The rooms are well-appointed, and large chalets all have sizable and impressive common areas and kitchens. There’s also a small pool if you don’t fancy a dip in the river. There’s a new, large conference centre with all the modern amenities you’d need. 

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Royal Senchi
Hotels

Royal Senchi

The Royal Senchi Resort is a bold undertaking; a largely thatched 84-room complex with facilities for large conferences just west of the town of Akosombo. Its location by the river gives it a wild tropical feel, while being within a 90-minute drive from Accra. The four-star hotel is impressive. The rooms are broken into four blocks. The 74 standard rooms (called River View rooms, for obvious reasons) were sizable, with a private patio area and even a view from the bathtub. Ask for an upstairs room for the airy high ceilings. The nine suites are large too, and the presidential suite has a private plunge pool. Those not willing to splash out quite so much can splash around the lovely pool that also overlooks the river. There’ll be all the usual amenities: spa, shop, business centre, restaurant, lounge bar, and the conference suite with two break out rooms and meeting areas is well equipped. There are canoes and launches for playing on the (crocodile-free) river. There are plans for a nine-hole golf course, a football pitch, basketball and kids' play area among other attractions.

Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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A complete guide to Mole National Park
Things to do

A complete guide to Mole National Park

To find Ghana's best wildlife, it's Mole National Park in the north of the country where you need to head. Here's our guide to the park.  Mole (pronounced Mo-lay) National Park is Ghana’s biggest wildlife sanctuary. There are 93 mammal species in the park, including buffalo, warthogs, hippos and several antelope species.  For practical purposes, one of the places to stay is Mole Motel (027 756 4444, www.molemotelgh.com), the only hotel inside the park. Situated on the edge of an escarpment and looking out over a waterhole, it’s somewhere where monkey-watching becomes just another part of breakfast, lunch or dinner. In the dry season, it’s not uncommon for elephants to pay sneaky visits to the hotel’s swimming pool. A new luxury residence is about to open called Zaina Lodge (030 393 8736, www.zainalodge.com). This ecolodge is located in Mole National Park. Facilities will include an infinity pool, open bar fire pit and 25 rooms with private balconies and outdoor showers if you choose!   The park office next to the motel acts as the meeting point for localised game waland looks over two waterholes (on which elephants tend to be the main draw), or 4x4 tours much deeper into the Mole Park. Despite the hotel and park office, there’s very little in the way of tourist infrastructure. This is seen by many as a positive thing, and one consequence is that it’s become an important place for scientific study, particularly in relation to poaching and sustainability.  Two hours from th

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Colours of Elmina
Travel

Colours of Elmina

Is there a more colourful vision in Ghana than Elmina's fishing port on a clear morning? This masculine little town subjects the visitor to a whirl of sights, sounds and smells like nowhere else on the coast. The clatter and chatter of the fish market is a world unto itself and truly a sight to behold - a swarming rainbow palette of batik dresses and football shirts offset by great tubs of crabs, squid and mahi-mahi, all dominated by the painted hulls of newly returned pirogues, themselves strewn with flags and washing. When you factor in a supporting cast of goats, chickens and wheeling birds of prey, not to mention the oven-door heat blast, it's quite a scene.

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Cape Coast Castle
Attractions

Cape Coast Castle

You’ll most likely be aware of Cape Coast Castle already (Barack and Michelle Obama visited in 2009 to much fanfare), as it was here that some of the worst atrocities of the slave trade era were committed. The city was founded by the Portuguese in the 15th century, and the solid white bulk of the castle acted first as a fortified base for overseeing the export of gold and other goods before ‘market forces’ initiated a move into human trafficking. A tour of the site today makes for a harrowing, but undeniably salutary, visit. Thousands upon thousands of West African men and women were imprisoned within the castle’s scratched dungeon walls – in truly horrific conditions – before passing the ‘Door of No Return’ and being shipped off to the Americas, the majority of them not surviving to reach their final destination. To establish a clearer understanding of the crushing reality of the period, the 45-minute guided tour (included in the ticket price) comes highly recommended. There’s also a museum on site. The Castle is now listed as a World Heritage Site, and gazing down today from its old ramparts at the late-afternoon hubbub of fishermen and red-dust footballers, it’s hard not to be stirred by the human cost of its past.

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