Adrián Villar Rojas: Today We Reboot The Planet

  • Art
Critics' choice
1/5
'Today We Reboot The Planet'

© 2013 Jörg Baumann, courtesy Serpentine Sackler Gallery

2/5
'Today We Reboot The Planet'

© 2013 Jörg Baumann, courtesy Serpentine Sackler Gallery

3/5
'Today We Reboot The Planet'

© 2013 Jörg Baumann, courtesy Serpentine Sackler Gallery

4/5
'Today We Reboot The Planet'

© 2013 Jörg Baumann, courtesy Serpentine Sackler Gallery

5/5
'Today We Reboot The Planet'

© 2013 Jörg Baumann, courtesy Serpentine Sackler Gallery

Free

Zaha Hadid’s spiky extension to the Serpentine’s new Sackler Gallery is futuristically (and characteristically) eye-grabbing. Yet, in the main galleries (which occupy a Grade II*-listed former gunpowder store), you’ll discover a more introspective atmosphere, courtesy of young Argentinian artist Villar Rojas. There's a giant clay jumbo wedged beneath a beam but the most incredible part of this show is contained within thick clay walls. Here lies a kind of workshop, lab and archive comprising some 2,000 objects. Made up of organic and sculpted elements, these strange items include bone-like growths made from clay, an air plant ‘growing’ in a beaten-up trainer and worn bars of soap arranged on a pedestal like a modernist sculpture from the 1950s. It feels like you've discovered an ancient tomb, with some objects decaying while others sprout decadently (and a little worryingly) to life.

Martin Coomer

Average User Rating

3.7 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:2
  • 4 star:0
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:1
LiveReviews|3
1 person listening
carmenloofah

The only element of interest in this exhibition for me was the sound of the loose bricks in the flooring. Unfired random objects, made in haste resembled nothing of any sort post-apocalyptic to me and I was thoroughly disappointed. The kids are sure to enjoy the entrance sculpture. I was told excitedly by a member of staff that the objects will decay over the course of this exhibition, so what, is that original, no!

Kate Rushton

The 20 minute queues are definitely worth it. This really is art at its best. Adrián's elephant represents how I sometimes feel with the weight of the world on my shoulders. I also liked the vibe created by the brick flooring and the general feeling of being in a kiln. A well-deserved 5 out of 5