Richard Hamilton

Art

Installation

Tate Modern

Until Mon May 26

  • Richard Hamilton

    'Hommage à Chrysler Corp' 1957

    © The estate of Richard Hamilton

    Richard Hamilton
  • Richard Hamilton

    'Still-life' 1965

    © The estate of Richard Hamilton

    Richard Hamilton
  • Richard Hamilton

    'Kent State' 1970

    © The estate of Richard Hamilton

    Richard Hamilton
  • Richard Hamilton

    'The Citizen' 1981-3

    © The estate of Richard Hamilton

    Richard Hamilton
  • Richard Hamilton

    Marcel Duchamp 
'The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass)
', 1915–23, reconstruction by Richard Hamilton 1965–66, lower panel remade 1985

    © The estate of Richard Hamilton

    Richard Hamilton
  • Richard Hamilton

    'Bathroom - Fig. 2' 1999-2000

    © The estate of Richard Hamilton

    Richard Hamilton
  • Richard Hamilton

    'Shock and Awe' 2010

    © The estate of Richard Hamilton

    Richard Hamilton
  • Richard Hamilton

    'Sunset', 1974

    © The estate of Richard Hamilton

    Richard Hamilton

Richard Hamilton

'Hommage à Chrysler Corp' 1957

© The estate of Richard Hamilton

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LiveReviews|6
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caroline t

A friend and I went to see this exhibition with her 3 year old daughter…and we all loved it! Little Milly had such perceptive comments about the work. She loved the bright pieces ….and knew exactly which ones to walk by! - about the line of prints of Mick Jagger she said 'They're all the same!' Don't worry if you have children with you, you'll have such a good time talking about the work and listening to their comments. Oh yes…and you'll be in the presence of Richard Hamilton's amazing view of the world.

Curated London

Richard Hamilton invented Pop Art. At least, he was the first to coin the term, as well as to provide an accurate and enduring definition. It is in this context that many visitors to Tate’s mammoth retrospective will view his work, and the reason they may be a little disappointed.


British artist Hamilton was a singular talent. Studying at the Slade in the late 1940s, he worked at the cutting edge of contemporary art until his death in 2011 at the age of 89. This exhibition features his paintings, prints and photography alongside his richly-detailed installations and the plans that enabled them. He had a rare combination of great technical skill (his draftsmanship was remarkably clean and precise) combined with wit and creativity. These latter qualities are perhaps most in evidence in his political protest pictures from the 1990s and 2000s.


Many will expect an exhibition of the Grandfather of Pop Art to be filled with work only of this period. In that respect, they are likely to be disappointed. For as times changed, Hamilton’s work evolved; he, like the rest of the world, left Pop Art behind in the 1960s. Accordingly, the show as a whole feels a little staid - monotone, even. It’s also fair to say that some of the pieces are definitely showing their age. Fun House, in particular, was groundbreaking in 1956 when it was first shown at the Whitechapel Gallery, but now feels very tired.


There are some gems. If Fun House looks a little dated, theTreatment Room and Lobby installations both remain engaging and erudite. War GamesOrthodox Rendition and Shock & Awe are sardonic observations on our involvement in the Middle East. They continue to be relevant up to 20 years later. 


Over all, this huge collection of Hamilton’s work is well worth visiting. Just don’t expect too much Pop Art.


For more art in plain English, visit http://www.curatedlondon.co.uk


Kate Janoskova

An excellent exhibition that reminds you why you should drag your friends along. It covers everything, eases you gently into how RH progressed in his thoughts, influences, it's funny (you really can not suppress a chuckle in 'Flowers and shit' room). And leaves you energised and thinking about how to improve your life and bring more depth and thought to the most ordinary objects and actions.

Ann Smith

Great historic exhibition - a chance to see some iconic work first hand, nothing like the real thing, a must go see for all those interested in Art and Design and the the way we see the world today..