Shoryu Ramen

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
Critics' choice
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Piccadilly Circus

Second branch of the Hakata ramen restaurant on Regent Street. The Soho spot has a more restaurant-y feel than the canteen-like original. There's the same range of noodles in long-simmered bone broth, plus steamed hirata buns stuffed with juicy pork slices, chilli sauce and mayo.

There is also a saké sommelier Mimi Tokumine, who is often on hand to offer advice to diners. However be warned this is not a bar; arrive on your own and you'll not be seated until the rest of your party arrives, and you need to order a meal to go with your drinks.

Venue name: Shoryu Ramen
Address: 3 Denman Street
Opening hours: Open 11.45am-3pm, 5-11.30pm Mon-Fri; 11.45am-3.30pm, 5-11pm Sat; 11.45-3pm, 5-10.30pm Sun.
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Average User Rating

4.3 / 5

Rating Breakdown

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Bebe C

Shoryu Ramen has expanded to four branches across London, and I much prefer this to the many ramen competitors. The stock is delicious without feeling oily or sickly, the noodles are springy and obviously freshly made, and the extras are complimenting, depending on which ramen choice you make. They even do a chilled ramen option for those summery & hot days. An extra treat would be to order the fluffy Shoryu (hirata) buns filled with pork belly or tiger prawn tempura. Also I would recommend the chikuwa fishcakes, which are little tubes of fishcake filled with gooey, melted cheese. Drinkswise, if you like lychee & jasmine, you must order the Pinky Lychee Jasmine (iced) Tea.

Staff WriterStaff Comp

One of my favourite ramen spots in London, and there's a lot to choose from! The Tonkotsu is more authentic than most, the saké list is impressive and the steamed buns are great too. There are several types of ramen on offer, all are worth trying but my favourite has to be their signature ramen. Shoryu has a no reservations policy therefore I'd recommend avoiding peak times and stick to a smaller group as there's often a queue down the street. Staff are friendly, the Regent Street venue has a good atmosphere, well worth the wait for a table.

Addyson Pope

I’m addicted to ramen. There, I said it. I’m hooked on the stuff and need a regular fix of bone broth to keep my withdrawal symptoms at bay. The fragrant bowls of steaming liquor provide the ultimate pleasure for my palate. Problem is, I’ve found another delicious supplier to feed my uncontrollable habit. Ramen fever has spread to epidemic proportions in our capital over the past year thanks to the opening of three very different, but hugely popular Japanese tastemakers. Bone Daddies, Tonkotsu and Shoryu have been cooking up vats of the stuff to hungry Londoners with raving success, each gaining a loyal following. After my umpteenth trip to Bone Daddies (I much prefer their broths to Tonkotsu’s) I thought it was about time I gave Shoryu a whirl, and play the ramen field a little. I tipped up at the newest and largest of the two Shoryu branches in Soho and was confronted with a jam-packed restaurant and a queue. Nothing new there then you may say, it is London after all. But this was no ordinary evening; the mercury was tipping 30 degrees, we were in the midst of a freak heat wave and these people were still flocking to dine on piping hot soup - I figured they must be doing something right. Hopes were high. The venue however was underwhelming and predictable, typical ‘pan-Asian’ décor resembled a Busaba Eathai and a Ping Pong interior lovechild. But don’t judge a book by its cover, one glance at menu was enough to forget the stereotypical surroundings and get lost in a watery world of ramen. Larger and more diverse then the original Regent Street offerings, Shoryu had a menu filled with authentic hot soups, hirata buns, yakitori skewers and even cold broths more suited to the sweltering weather outside. Of the three ramen I sampled the ‘Dracula Tonkotsu’ stood out as being the most unusual; bbq pork with roasted black garlic mayu, balsamic vinegar and garlic chips gave it a sweet and tangy taste unlike anything I’ve tried before. The signature ‘Ganso Tonkotsu’ was a clear and light miso broth loaded with the usual trimmings; half boiled egg, seaweed, bamboo shoots and perfectly al dente noodles. My personal favourite, the fiery and rich ‘Tantan Tonkotsu’ packed a serious chilli kick and with its hefty load of minced pork was a much heavier alternative to the others. Not one for the spice-shy I hasten to add. ‘Salted chicken skins’ would have benefited from another 60 seconds cooking, more fatty and soggy than salty and crisp. Cocktails, much like the décor were fitting but not thrilling. I unsuccessfully attempted to cool off by sipping a Shochu sour on the rocks whilst intermittently dabbing stray splatters of chilli-ramen juice (and beads of sweat) from my brow. I may have been hot, but boy was I satisfied. As a ramen obsessive Shoryu had a lot to live up to. The food was much more adventurous than Tonkotsu but the vibe wasn’t as cool as Bone Daddies. In terms of the big three, I’d say it takes an honourable second place in the power struggle to be top of the ramen revolution – others will disagree. It may be tarred with a ‘Japanese junk food’ brush but it sure feels much more wholesome than the usual burger and chips I wolf down after a late night Negroni session, either way I’ll be back for another hit very soon. Looks like I’ll be chasing the ramen dragon for a little while longer. Someone call The Priory, I’m addicted.