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The best bars in Little Italy and Nolita

The best Little Italy and Nolita bars include 1920s gastropubs, clubby speakeasies and vintage-fitted cocktail parlors

Photograph: Clotilde Testa
Randolph at Broome

Whether you're looking for laidback sipping, cocktail geeking or amping up to hit the clubs, you'll find the kind of watering hole you need on this walkable stretch between Houston and Canal. This minute, on-trend neighborhood touts all manner of entertainment—including some of the best first-date restaurants and destination-worthy speakeasy bars. Take a look at the best places to booze in Little Italy and NoLita.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Little Italy and Nolita

Best bars in Little Italy and Nolita

Botanica

The thrift-store decor (mismatched chairs with sagging seats, statues of the Virgin Mary and a faux fireplace) makes for a charmingly shabby backdrop at this downtown dive, a favorite among laid-back creative types and the occasional gaggle of NYU students. Libations range from basic brews (eight on tap include Blue Point Toasted Lager) to house cocktails like a rosemary-infused vodka number sloshed with mint and ginger beer. DJs spin every night (except Monday and karaoke Sunday), providing a sultry soundtrack for the singles lounging in the conversation-friendly back room.

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Nolita

Milano’s Bar

This no-nonsense Nolita dive has an Italian moniker, but that’s where the affectations end. Suck in your stomach and squeeze through the narrow stretch between the bar and the clammy back wall, a bottleneck for the eclectic crowd of artists and perpetual barflies. You might need to holler your order over the juke’s noisy rock tunes—keep it simple and ask for the signature beer-and-shot combo ($11).

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Nolita

Mother's Ruin

At this airy Nolita drinkery, co-owners Timothy Lynch and Richard Knapp sling classic and contemporary drinks. The laid-back space—done up with a cream tin ceiling, exposed brick and weathered-wood bar—also offers a full menu. Sip your cocktail and nibble on globally inflected bites, including the TONY-approved spicy fried chickpeas, French onion grilled cheeses and ginger-glazed duck wings.

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Nolita

Mulberry Project

Cool-hunters looking for a break from clubland can hit this underground boîte, tucked away beneath a cut-rate handbag shop in Little Italy. The unlikely hot spot—complete with a strict door policy—is a testament to the nightlife bona fides of the bar’s owners, who have cashed in on their affiliations (GoldBar, Bagatelle, Milk and Honey) to create this sceney speakeasy. Haute cocktails replace bottle service as the in-crowd currency, with most drinkers rolling the dice on bespoke tipples crafted by Mulberry Project’s cavalier mixologists.

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Little Italy

Mulberry Street Bar

Come by the bar formerly known as Mare Chiaro (a.k.a. the Sinatra Bar) during the week. You’ll find colorful patrons occupying the rickety tables and listening to Mario Lanza on the jukebox while slugging beer and shots. On weekends, the spot takes a turn for the suburban, with would-be Sopranos extras swilling six-buck Cosmos and telling anyone within earshot that scenes from The Godfather Part III were filmed here.

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Little Italy

The Randolph at Broome

In yet another testament to Nolita’s growing nightlife cred, this 1,500-square-foot booze destination occupies the former M Bar space. Classic cocktails (think Pimm’s cups) mingle with signature drinks like the Michael Derry (Stella Artois, vodka and lemon juice). Randolph features weekly theme nights, but Prohibition buffs shouldn’t hold their breath—parties, like the Sunday evening tribute to Prince, tend toward the latter half of the century.

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Little Italy

The Ship

This sexy den from Little Branch’s Joseph Schwartz and Cervantes Ramirez welcomes you to the depths below with subtly upscale touches: warm lighting and dark woods, highly attentive hosts at your service and a slew of quaffs to pore over. The delicate Pom Ricky ($14) tames floral gin with swirls of lime grenadine and soda, and an aptly named Buck Up ($14) sips a bit stiffer with añejo rum spiced by ginger and soothed with cuke.

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Little Italy

Sweet & Vicious

Two pistols found during the bar’s construction are menacingly displayed in the doorway, but this relaxed downtown bar is more sweet than vicious. Bargoers crowd onto wooden benches or gather on a graffiti-adorned patio, weather permitting, to tip back pints of Hoegaarden. Beware: Like many downtown joints, what’s chill during the week can get packed on weekends.

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Nolita
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