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Christina Izzo

Christina Izzo

Christina is the Food & Drink editor at Time Out. She can out-eat and out-drink you. Seriously, don't even try her—you're gonna lose. Follow her on Twitter at @christinalizzo.

Articles (133)

The best things to do in the Hamptons

The best things to do in the Hamptons

FYI: There are more things to do in the Hamptons than just getting a tan. Yes, that argument can be said for any of the beaches near NYC, but you wouldn’t just go to the Hamptons for a quick trip. Make no mistake, people do. But, in our opinion, the Hamptons is truly meant to be a destination at which you can kill time trying great restaurants, drinking frozen cocktails at outdoor bars, visitng wineries and lounging on beautiful sandy shores. Take a break from Gotham’s rooftop bars for these awesome things to do in the Hamptons. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best things to do on Long IslandRECOMMENDED: The best Hampton Airbnbs

Get your fill with all you can eat sushi in NYC

Get your fill with all you can eat sushi in NYC

The phrase “all you can eat” might conjure images of massive buffets with piles of questionably-nutritious food sitting under heat lamps, but when it comes to sushi it’s a different story. Restaurants with all you can eat sushi in NYC are a welcome break for those with strained wallets looking to enjoy the Japanese delicacy. Dining deals are essential in this city, given that the best NYC restaurants are often quite pricey. From happy hours to bottomless brunches, cheap eats are key to stretching those dollars. Obviously you can splurge at one of many amazing sushi restaurants in NYC, but when you really just want to get your fix of fresh salmon, tuna, snapper and seaweed, these all you can eat sushi spots are more manageable. Tip: going out for sushi might be a go-to romantic date option, but you don’t want your sweetie to watch you eat until you burst, so check out our list of cheap date ideas before you make that call.

The 22 best tacos in NYC

The 22 best tacos in NYC

Tacos have it all: Portability, versatility and the ability to be filled with an endless array of crackling meats, gooey cheeses and eye-wateringly spicy sauces. Our list of the city’s very best tacos includes traditional tastes from our favorite Mexican restaurants, affordable options (how else can you get satisfying cheap eats for under $3?) and trendy dishes from fine dining hot spots. With out-of-the-way taquerias serving up juicy al pastor, a Bushwick tortilla factory serving the city’s best chorizo and a beach-side spot for fresh fish tacos, we’ve made it easy to plan your city-wide taco crawl.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The 21 best hot dogs in NYC

The 21 best hot dogs in NYC

New York City’s most iconic foods: the pretzel, the bodega coffee…the hot dog. While street meat served from carts beneath red-and-yellow umbrellas is the quintessential NYC treat, we’ve rounded up the very best assortment of wieners from all over town, including both high-end hot dogs and extremely cheap eats.Here, you’ll find hot dogs served from burger joints, dive bars, Mexican restaurants and some of New York’s best delis—all waiting to be covered in mustard and eaten while you walk around the streets of NYC. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

17 best cheap brunch spots in NYC

17 best cheap brunch spots in NYC

Want bottomless mimosas, but don’t have bottomless pockets? We’ve rounded up the best cheap brunches in NYC so you and your friends can get your cheap eats on and still have cash left for a yoga class (or, you know, another round of drinks). Roll out of bed and head to the best brunch in Brooklyn or nurse your hangover with a Bloody Mary and the best pancakes in NYC. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best brunch in NYC

79 notable NYC restaurants and bars that permanently closed since 2020

79 notable NYC restaurants and bars that permanently closed since 2020

Since March of 2020, New York City's restaurants and bars have demonstrated their resilience by the previously everyday act of maintaining operations. Many opened or expanded outdoor dining and new takeout and delivery options, for example. And happily, the list of new and anticipated openings continues to grow.  Still, the number of businesses that have had to close their doors for good is staggering. This winter's edition of notable NYC closures includes Yuco in the West Village, Sidecar in Park Slope and Michelin-starred Benno in NoMad among others. Many New Yorkers didn’t have a chance to say goodbye to the following establishments, but we think of them fondly. 

The 29 best Chinese restaurants in NYC

The 29 best Chinese restaurants in NYC

New York City has a long lineage of excellent Chinese restaurants showcasing the culinary traditions of nearly every province in China, as well as the fusion fare created by immigrants in the United States. Whether you're looking to sample fiery Szechuan fare at tiny Chinatown restaurants, experience a classic weekend dim sum brunch at an area icon, or grab top-notch takeout and delivery to enjoy at home, the city has an abundance of options. These are the best Chinese restaurants in NYC. RECOMMENDED: See all of the best restaurants in NYC

The 16 best restaurants in Soho

The 16 best restaurants in Soho

One of NYC’s most famous neighborhoods, we humbly submit that Soho’s food and drink options are one of the attractions that gave it that categorization. Sure, it also has world-class galleries and, in recent years, an abundance of shopping destinations you’ll also see all over the world, but restaurants and bars are part of the fabric of every neighborhood. And these are Soho’s best.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The best restaurants in NYC's Chelsea

The best restaurants in NYC's Chelsea

Like most New York City neighborhoods, Chelsea, on Manhattan’s west side between about 6th and 11th Avenue and 14th and 34th Street (though those boundaries are sometimes called into question!) has changed over the years in myriad ways. For one, restaurants and bars come and go. But one thing is certain, Chelsea still has many excellent places to eat and drink the next time you’re strolling the High Line or checking out the area’s art galleries.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chelsea, New York

The 13 best seafood restaurants in NYC

The 13 best seafood restaurants in NYC

Thanks to NYC's proximity to open water, seafood has always been on the menu in the five boroughs. From river to river, you'll find dollar oysters at happy hour, seaside eateries and celebrations of the very bivalves that work to keep our waterways clear. These are the city's best seafood restaurants for cracking lobsters, slurping oysters and hand-picking your own fresh fish right now. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

5 star restaurants in NYC

5 star restaurants in NYC

Over the years, Time Out New York has awarded the coveted five stars to just a handful of NYC restaurants, who have all achieved that damn-near-perfect balance of cuisine, decor and innovation. Among this select group are fine-dining titans, long-standing hotel restaurants and international imports running the gamut from Mexican to Korean cuisines. Say hello to the ten 5 star restaurants in NYC, as determined by our critics. RECOMMENDED: See all of the best restaurants in NYC

30 iconic NYC institutions that have now permanently closed

30 iconic NYC institutions that have now permanently closed

New Yorkers are resilient and rugged as all hell, but that doesn't mean it didn't sting when some of our favorite stores and boutiques and restaurants and bars closed in 2020 and 2021. Losing iconic venues like historic speakeasies, beloved improv theaters, century-old department stores and mom-and-pop neighborhood hangouts meant that NYC lost a little bit of its magic in the last year. But, if there's anything we know well, is that no city is better at bouncing back than good ol' Gotham. Until then, we'll be pouring one out for these much-missed NY institutions. 

Listings and reviews (146)

Friendsgiving at the Market

Friendsgiving at the Market

Planning on staying in NYC for Thanksgiving? You don’t have to struggle with fitting a turkey into that apartment-sized oven, or figuring out how to safely host in your no-windows-anywhere studio. Instead, gather your lockdown squad for a socially-distanced feast courtesy of Time Out Market New York, which is welcoming groups ($30 each for up to six people; $50 each for 7-10 people) on Thanksgiving weekend. Complementing the market's festive eats, each table will be outfitted with pitchers of winter-spiced sangria for some extra holiday cheers.

Cosme

Cosme

5 out of 5 stars

Enrique Olvera, the megawatt Mexico City talent behind Pujol (regularly ranked one of the 20 best restaurants in the world) made his stateside debut with Cosme, a bare-concrete Flatiron dining room slinging elegant, high-gear small plates. Pristine, pricey and as market-fresh as anything coming out of Thomas Keller’s kitchen, Olvera’s menu is a masterpiece. Tacos make a solitary appearance, in an atypically generous portion of duck carnitas, cooked to the sinful midpoint of unctuous fat and seared flesh. But his single-corn tortillas pop up frequently, from a complimentary starter of crackly blue-corn tortillas with chile-kicked pumpkin-seed butter to dense, crispy tostadas dabbed with bone-marrow salsa and creamy tongues of uni. Those soft corn rounds accompany the cobia al pastor, a beautifully toned-down take on the original, with slips of delicate white fish whispered with pasilla, guajillo and tart pineapple sauce. And they’re there to cradle supple, roasted hunks of lobster pipil, nestled in a heady pool of black-bean–chorizo puree. But it’s that face-melting, savory-sweet, Instagrammed-to-death husk meringue, with its fine, ash-dusted hull giving way to a velvety, supercharged corn mousse, that cements Olvera’s status as not only one of the country’s premier haute-Mex ambassadors but also the corn whisperer of New York dining. And what damn fine dining it is.

Olmsted

Olmsted

4 out of 5 stars

This Prospect Heights blow-in from Greg Baxtrom (Per Se, Blue Hill at Stone Barns). On paper, Olmsted’s partiality for hyperfresh produce isn’t exactly a distinctive quality, but its sheer dedication to freshness sets it apart. An urban minifarm behind the modestly dressed restaurant provide Baxtrom’s kitchen with radishes and lovage; a bird coop coos with quails laying eggs; and a repurposed claw-foot bathtub sloshes with crayfish. Servers ask if you want to wait for a table on a cushioned bench in the backyard garden, with a cocktail and crayfish crackers, say, beneath strung lights—answer yes when they do. Only snacks are available outside; the real good stuff is within the 50-seat den, such as a gorgeous bowl of charred-fennel chawanmushi. Baxtrom levels the dreamy, delicate egg custard with a crush of crispy artichokes and the umami punch of Burgundy truffle. Torn scallops—often discounted, usually discarded—are dry-rubbed, skewered and grilled until tender, the charcoal singe and pop of pasilla chile in the rub acting as a smoky foil to the summery pool of creamed corn and stewed blueberry that accompanies the mollusks, the pool itself a balancing act between savory and sweet. These are fine-dining ambitions wrapped in neighborhood-spot environs, where the most expensive entrée doesn’t exceed $25, impromptu happy birthday sing-alongs occur between strangers, and you can openly curse over just how fucking good a dish is. And it is.

Kat & Theo

Kat & Theo

4 out of 5 stars

This Flatiron gem offers seasonal, New American fare from executive chef David Fisher, who's put in time in such Michelin-starred restaurants as Jean-Georges, Aquavit and Aldea. From an open kitchen overlooking the 70-seat dining room—a moody, brick-walled stretch divided into a front bar area fitted with leather booths and metal trellis archways, and a back dining room warmed with a stone fireplace—Fisher deploys starters like tomato-braised octopus with cannellini beans ($18), and delicata squash agnolotti with lemony shrimp and firey chiles ($14). Robust mains include a juicy hanger steak accompanied by earthy rutabagas ($28), and a slow cooked leg of duck glazed accented with sweet plums ($29). 

The Grill

The Grill

5 out of 5 stars

Since 1959, the Four Seasons was the city’s most exclusive supper club, a veritable village green for New York’s wealthy, famous and powerful. So the real surprise is how deftly Major Food Group—the restaurant label from Rich Torrisi, Mario Carbone and Jeff Zalaznick that’s yielded New York’s splashiest dining rooms (Carbone, Dirty French, Sadelle’s)—has dazzled in its remake of the famed Grill Room. It’s not just the deference for the landmark interior, though the familiar glass walls, metallic blinds and Richard Lippold–designed brass fixture over the bar should pacify the worried old guard. It’s also the midcentury menu, inspired by Delmonico’s and 21 Club, where chef Carbone reconstructs continental classics like filet Peconic, lobster Newburg and three iterations of Dover sole (horseradish meunière, grilled Riviera, and Neptune’s crown). But Carbone's finest dishes are those that fuse dinner and theater: a twirl of noodles begins with your waiter running pieces of roasted duck, squab and pheasant through an antique press at your table, the savory jus of which serves as the pasta’s sauce.  And, of course, there’s the prime rib wheeled on $10,000 silver-domed service trolleys by tuxedo-clad waiters to tables populated with the likes of Jerry Seinfeld and Gwyneth Paltrow. The spit-roasted beef is sliced to order, revealing rosy, dripping flesh beneath a dark, charred crust, which is then showered in grated horseradish. While your eyes are still glazed over, out comes the ac

L’Amico

L’Amico

Laurent Tourondel tackled burgers, steak and market-driven menus while under the BLT empire. Now the prolific French chef is dabbling in Italian influences with this 90-seat corner bistro, honoring his rural European upbringing with rustic Windsor chairs, accordion-style sliding windows and a pair of copper wood-burning ovens, visible from the dining room, for firing pizza. Before pitchfork-wielding purists come harping on the virtues of New York versus Neapolitan, it’s worth noting that Tourondel’s pies are neither. Pulled from one of those ovens (the other is dedicated to firing tendrils of octopus and Calabrian-chili–smacked orata), the small-scale rounds sport the blister and blackening of much mightier pies. Between those charred puffs, crusts are paved, in order of most to least bewitching, with feisty sopressata picante, tangy tomato and Sicilian oregano for the menu’s sole red pie; rugged crumbles of Esposito’s sausage with shishito peppers and fennel pollen; and one-note white mushrooms with truffle paste and Taleggio. Like any French chef worth his toque, Tourondel clearly knows his way around a carbohydrate, and house-made pastas are further proof. Cranked through an extruder in the open kitchen, tender curls of pipe rigate are richened with veal-shoulder bolognese, and a seasonal fusilli is gamely tossed with zesty sausage, bitter greens and pine nuts.  

Leuca

Leuca

4 out of 5 stars

Want to save 50% on your food bill here? Check out Time Out 'Table for Two': The Favorites Box The building’s an eyesore—a 22-story clunker jutting out from the squat Williamsburg skyline—but the basement, oddly enough, is a beauty. At the subterranean foot of the William Vale Hotel rests Leuca, the third dining concept from chef-restaurateur Andrew Carmellini (Locanda Verde, the Dutch) and his NoHo Hospitality team at the hotel. (The group also oversees rooftop bar Westlight and burger-slinging Airstream Mister Dips.)It’s a surprisingly expansive space, that basement, aided by soaring ceilings and light-catching marble surfaces. The front room is a brighter affair, with vast stretches of hand-painted tile and barstools the color of biscotti; through archways that flank the marble bar, you’ll find the main dining room, monochromatic in tawny leather save for oversize black-and-white portraits from photographer Rich Kubiszewski. It’s an attractive, adult addition to the ’hood, but you never quite shake the feeling that it’s the kind of place to bring your parents when they finally decide to venture to Williamsburg. The menu, too, is smart and civilized but largely safe. Carmellini takes inspiration from Italy’s south, yielding dishes like a starter of sheep’s-milk ricotta folded with warm honey and toasted garlic ($12). It’s served with Sicilian bread, but you’re quickly instructed to save some of the cheese to spread on your pizza later—it acts as a rich, sweet foil to a char

Mu Ramen

Mu Ramen

4 out of 5 stars

Mu Ramen, the noodle insta-hit from husband-and-wife team Joshua and Heidy Smookler, is a warmly lit, brick-walled room with a scant 22 seats. But it’s an upgrade from the couple’s pop-up days, when they doled steaming bowls out of a nearby bagel shop. The best seats in the house are at the bar overlooking the open kitchen, where the chefs operate with sushi-bar intimacy, cracking jokes while pulling golden-crisp chicken from the fryer and shaking pots of just-boiled noodles as easily as tumbler-happy bartenders. Those strands are delicate but with an al dente spring, and there's a different variety showcased in each bowl. Most notable, though, is the flagship ramen. Built on a broth of oxtail and bone marrow, the house bowl gets some extra-meaty oomph from melting cubes of brisket, which, paired with shredded cabbage and half-sour pickles, toes Jewish deli-novelty without succumbing to kitsch.  The chefs’ careful hands extend to non-noodle plates like the U&I. “Get everything in one go,” a sous chef instructs, and he’s right: A chopstick of warm rice spackled with butter-soft uni, briny, bursting salmon roe and luscious spicy maguro is a supremely composed bite. Then there’s the tebasaki gyoza, a deboned chicken wing crammed dumpling-style with creamy foie gras, soft brioche and quince compote. It’s a salty-sweet, creamy-crispy food anomaly that alone is worth the trip. RECOMMENDED: 101 best things do in NYC

Avant Garden

Avant Garden

4 out of 5 stars

The name is definitely worthy of an eye roll, but dad-joke hokeyness is graciously absent elsewhere at Avant Garden, a virtuous vegan-restaurant detour for owner Ravi DeRossi, whose personal brand of New York locales (the fondue-dipping Bourgeois Pig, the rum-doused Mother of Pearl) have heretofore been imbued with a Baz Luhrmann loucheness. Decadence is dialed down in the 28-seat space—a petrified-wood counter forsakes velvet trimmings and tiki camp; raw tree branches hang above an open kitchen; and the restaurant is painted in muted shades of earth—but there are indulgences to be had on the plate. Unlike many vegetarian efforts, chef Alex Aparicio’s cooking sidesteps any veg-as-meat posturing. Rather, produce is allowed to speak for itself. The closest to that trope is a puck of cubed pickled beets, the look of which is tartare but the taste is all taproot. Soothing farro risotto, warmly autumnal with butternut squash and swirls of sage pesto, doubles down on the grain, popping with crispy kernels for unexpected crunch. A tumble of funghi is a similarly effective showcase, with beefy king oysters and maitakes boosted by a drag of mushroom puree shot delightfully with smoked macadamia that had more than one perplexed diner asking, “Is there Gouda in this?” before being gently reminded that Gouda isn’t vegan. That might be Avant Garden’s biggest strength—it’s a vegan restaurant that puts as much import on the second half of that category as on the first.

Sweet Chick

Sweet Chick

At this wood-paneled chicken-and-waffle den, the soul-food staple gets a chefly update: Organic poultry is deep-fried and served atop flavored Belgian-style waffles (bacon and cheddar, rosemary and mushroom). Along with the namesake dish, carnivorous chow covers the communal picnic tables, like roasted pork tenderloin and dry-aged rib eye, and humble sides such as mustard greens, pickled watermelon rind and homemade buttermilk biscuits. Keeping up with the rustic-meets-refined spirit, the reclaimed wood bar offers tipples like a house-infused watermelon vodka martini and a classic rye Manhattan.

Attaboy

Attaboy

4 out of 5 stars

From the up-tempo retro tunes to the brightly lit, lived-in digs (whitewashed brick, tarnished marquee “A” on the wall), this Milk & Honey offshoot proves a breezy evolution of the form. The tucked-away Chinatown haunt, inherited by acclaimed M&H alums Sam Ross and Michael McIlroy, keeps the same bespoke protocol as its forebear: At the brushed-steel bar, suspender-clad drinks slingers stir off-the-cuff riffs to suit each customer’s boozy preference. A call for a citrusy, whiskey-based quaff yielded the Paper Plane, a bittersweet balance of bourbon, potent, herbal amaro, grapefruit-like Aperol and lemon juice that deftly hit on the fruity nose without being cloying. A barstool comrade, looking for something a little sweet, a little spicy and with a lot of tequila, found every criteria met with the Torch Light, brimming with honey and lime notes and pepped with a vinegary back-of-the-throat kick of hot sauce. The skeletons of the former bar still rattle around the space—the knock-and-buzz door system, the dusty tailors m&h alterations window—and wistful boozers can seek solace in Petraske-era standard-bearers, like Ross’s signature Penicillin, a still-inspiring blend of Laphroaig ten-year, honey-ginger syrup and lemon. But like its precursor, Attaboy is fine-tuned to boozehounds who know what they like but aren’t afraid to branch off, a testament to the attentive, savvy crew. With cocktail virtuosos like Ross and McIlroy tending to your desires, tipplers won’t be afraid when s

Mission Chinese Food

Mission Chinese Food

3 out of 5 stars

At his Mission Chinese redux, Danny Bowien has traded in beer kegs, paper dragons and a cramped, dive-punk Orchard Street basement for smart cocktails, banquet-hall booths and an ample, gleaming dining room in the far reaches of Chinatown. That inescapable hour-long wait for a table can be spent in the downstairs bar, but the real party is upstairs—a lively hodgepodge of bespectacled food disciples and beanie-clad millennials spinning lazy Susans loaded with pork cheeks and turnip cakes while golden-age hip-hop pumps through the room. It’s a rollicking good time, sure, but a wildly inconsistent one. The Scoville-crushing chicken wings have retained their unmerciful, skin-rippling heat, but other Bowien-fan favorites have had their burners turned down: The kung pao pastrami is a flickering flame compared to the four-alarm-chili roar it once was. The menu expands from those oldies with 30-plus new dishes, many of which show Bowien—with executive chef Angela Dimayuga—hasn’t wholly lost his edge. A tin of anchovies, served with tartine flatbread blistered by a wood oven inherited from former tenant Rosette, packs a power punch of pickled chili and crunchy fennel seed. It’s salty, spicy and impossible to stop picking at. The whole-smoked pork jowl is over-the-top lardy—one bite satisfies your fat quota for the day. Better are the Jurassic salt-and-pepper lamb rib tips, soft and lax on the bone. Slick a piece of flatbread with kefir crème fraîche, then pile on a few shreds of lamb

News (448)

ニューヨークの名物料理12選

ニューヨークの名物料理12選

ニューヨークでは、誰もが少しずつユダヤ人であり、イタリア人であり、中国人であり……。続ければキリがないが、このことは、ニューヨークが単なるメルティングポットではなく、小さな場所にたくさんのおいしいものが詰まった、特別なメルティングポットであることを意味している。ただ、どこから来ようが、一度ここに来れば、あなたは「ニューヨーカー」だ。 そして、我々が得意とすることといえば、食べること。有名なサンドイッチから、湯気立つスープ餃子、ピザまで、さまざまな「ローカルフード」がある。地元の人のように食事を楽しむためにトライしたい、ニューヨークの名物料理を紹介する。 Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber 1. 炭火オープンピザ シカゴでも、セントルイス、ニューヘブンなど、ピザで有名なアメリカの都市はいくつかある。しかし、スライス一つが1ドル(約110円)の立ち食いピザでも、レストランのホールピザでも、ニューヨークよりおいしいピザが食べられる場所はないだろう。本格的なピザにおいてニューヨークの唯一のライバルは、ナポリと言ってもいいぐらいだ。 1905年にジェンナーロ ・ロンバルディが、ロウアーイーストサイドでピザを焼き始めたのが、アメリカにおけるピザの始まりとされている。ピザはイタリアが発明したものかもしれない。しかし、サクサクとした食感の完璧なクラストの上に、たっぷりのマリナーラソース、溶けたチーズが乗ったニューヨークピザのスライスを見れば、ピザを完成させたのは我々だと納得がいくはずだ。 おすすめの店:ニューヨークでは基本的にどこでもおいしいピザが食べられるが、本当においしいものを食べたいのであれば、昔ながらの炭火オーブンピザでピザを作っている店に行くといい。ブルックリンのレジェンドといわれる、コニーアイランドのTotonno’sか、ミッドウッドのDi Fara Pizzaがおすすめ。 Jonathan BumblePhotograph: Jonathan Bumble   2. ベーグルのスモークサーモンサンドイッチ ニューヨークの日曜の朝に欠かせないこといえば、二日酔いと、それを治すためにデリで注文した、スモークサーモンとクリームチーズの入ったベーグルサンドイッチを食べることだろう。このサンドイッチの具体的な起源は不明だ。主な材料となるベーグルはニューヨークで生まれたものではないし、クリームチーズやスモークサーモンもこの街の発祥ではない。しかし、この三つの食材を組み合わせたゴージャスなサンドイッチは、ロウアーイーストサイドのユダヤ系移民が、エッグベネディクトなどのようなブランチの定番に代わり、(ユダヤ教の食事規定に対応した)コーシャ料理として考案したものだといわれている。 週末の一日をスタートさせるのに、スモークサーモンの塩気と濃厚なクリームチーズ、そしてカリッとした食感の焼きたてベーグルサンドイッチを食べる以外の方法があるだろうか。あるのであれば、教えてほしい。 おすすめの店:ダウンタウンで向かうべき店は、Russ & Daughters。創業店である総菜店と近くのカフェでは、満足のいくスモークサーモンサンドイッチが味わえる。アップタウンであれば、Barney Greengrassがいい。 Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz 3. チキンアンドワッフル  何を考えているか当ててみせよう。きっと読者の何人かは、アメリカ北部に住む我々が、南部の名物であるフライドチキンについて何が分かるのかと思っているの

ニューヨークのレストランウィーク「To Go」版で開催

ニューヨークのレストランウィーク「To Go」版で開催

ニューヨーク市観光局が主催しているイベント「レストランウィーク」が、2021年1月25日から『NYC Restaurant Week To Go』というイベント名のもと、新しい形式で開催中だ。「To Go」とあるように、今年の同イベントは、ニューヨーク市全域のテイクアウトやデリバリーにフォーカス。例年と違う形式ではあるが、ニューヨーク名物のイベントが今年も無事開催されることは、うれしい出来事だといえるだろう。 イベントに参加する店は、高級レストランから気軽に立ち寄れる店までさまざま。ラインアップされているのは、グラマシー・タバーン、レッドファーム、バー・ブールーなど。各参加店は「2021年」に合わせ、メイン料理と1品以上のサイドディッシュが含まれるランチ、またはディナーのセットを20.21ドル(約2,100円)で提供する(消費税、配送料、チップは含まれない)。 マスターカード社がプログラムのスポンサーになっているため、同ブランドのカード利用者は、うれしいことに全てのオーダーにつき10ドル(約1,040円)割引される。 ニューヨーク市観光局のプレジデント、フレッド・ディクソンは、「まだコロナ禍にあるとはいえ、ニューヨーク市を食の都として支え、数えきれないほどの家族の仕事を守ってきた、素晴らしいレストラン産業をサポートすることほど、重要なことはありません。このイベントの期間中、市民にはデリバリーやテイクアウトで、(20.21ドルでメインやサイドディッシュが楽しめる)『オールイン』を楽しんでいただきたいです」と述べている。 『NYC Restaurant Week To Go』は、2021年1月31日(日)までの開催(一部の店は、2021年2月7日(日)まで)。 原文はこちら 関連記事 『ニューヨークのレストランが新型コロナウイルス検査をメニューに追加』 『ニューヨークの高級星付きレストランが歩道へ出店』 『ニューヨーク市、小売店にも歩道を開放』 『アメリカで最もビーガンニーズに対応しているのはニューヨーク』 『ブルックリンの飲食店を集めたくなるレシピカードでサポート』

What to stream if you're missing New York City

What to stream if you're missing New York City

Even though we're in New York, we miss New York: The New York of the Before Times, when the streets were alive and the restaurants were bustling and the lights were dimming at the theater and the only real frustrations were glacially slow subways and picnic-blanket congestion at Sheep Meadow. But even though it might still be a while before that New York returns, you can still get a taste of it thanks to shows and movies that aren't only set in NYC but feel like NYC. We already waxed poetic on the New York nostalgia—not to mention the quotable quips—conjured up by Fran Lebowitz and Martin Scorsese's Netflix series, "Pretend It's a City". Here are five other shows and movies to stream if you're missing New York:  On the Rocks This Sofia Coppola newcomer is a frothy, fizzy sip of a bygone New York: The kind of New York where art dealers could still afford glamorous apartments on the Upper East Side, where lunch is of the martini sort at the 21 Club or Bemelmans Bar, where you could see Bill Murray and Rashida Jones barrel down cobblestoned downtown streets in a vintage convertible full of caviar. Starring Jones as Laura, a writer who thinks her husband is having an affair, and Murray as her suave, winking dad Felix, it's a father-daughter buddy-comedy but it's also a love letter to the elegant, effervescent Manhattan of our dreams. Streaming on: Apple TV + "Broad City" Few shows embody both the familiar and the fantastical nature of living in New York City quite like this Come

New York to resume indoor dining—except NYC

New York to resume indoor dining—except NYC

New York dining rooms are open again for business—sort of. Yesterday, Governor Cuomo announced that all restaurants located within orange zones in New York State would be allowed to resume indoor dining at half capacity, with some restrictions. For one, the measure would not include New York City and would only be temporary, with a final verdict set for next week. The decision comes as the result of a court case featuring more than 100 Erie County restaurants, which challenged the state’s confusing dining restrictions using its own data: that restaurants and bars accounted for 1.4 percent of COVID-19 cases in the state, compared to household gatherings, which netted nearly 74 percent of the cases. The judge ruled in favor of the restaurants and until the final verdict next week, the state has decided to move New York State eateries out of the orange zone and into the slightly more lenient yellow zone. Restaurants in yellow zones are permitted to serve up to four people a table both indoors and out, though indoor capacity still needs to max out at fifty percent. New York City, which has one orange zone in Staten Island, is not included in the demarcation because of population density, much to the chagrin of many restaurant owners. "The court's preliminary decision and the governor’s action to remove indoor dining restrictions in all 'orange zones' makes the status of the indoor dining ban in New York City all the more outrageous and destructive to thousands of restaurants a

Fran Lebowitz's 20 New York-iest quotes from "Pretend It's a City"

Fran Lebowitz's 20 New York-iest quotes from "Pretend It's a City"

Netflix's latest limited series, Pretend It's a City, is a New York fever dream: The seven-episode docuseries is directed by Martin Scorsese, for one, and mostly follows Marty and his good friend and local legend Fran Lebowitz palling around the Players Club, the New York Public Library and the streets of Manhattan as she complains and quips about, well, everything. Michael Bloomberg, Leonardo DiCaprio, cab drivers, distracted walkers, the Dalai Lama—nobody is safe from the writer's infamously sharp-witted critiques and commentary. Through all of these tart takedowns, however, is a sweet loyalty to New York itself, as it was back in the '70s when Lebowitz got her start as a columnist at Andy Warhol's Interview magazine, and as it is now. It's a wistful watch, especially during a time when so much of ever-moving New York City is on pause, but it's also jam-packed with quotes that will leave you chuckling long after the credits roll. Here are 20 of our favorites: 1. "Let me tell you what smells horrible on the L train: The passengers." 2. "The only person I've ever met who disagrees with me as much as [Spike Lee] are my relatives."3. "How would I describe my lifestyle? Well, I can assure you, I would never use the word 'lifestyle.'" 4. "It's an amazing thing because there are millions of people [in New York], and the only person looking where they are going is me." 5. "If you can eat it, it's not art. If you can say 'I'll have that and a cup of coffee,' it's not art." 6. "One

Savannah's best chef is doing takeout in NYC for three months

Savannah's best chef is doing takeout in NYC for three months

For culinary programming run by a car company, Intersect by Lexus has featured some surprisingly excellent chefs in their Restaurant-in-Residence rotation, and this month's is no exception: Mashama Bailey, the James Beard Award-winning chef behind The Grey (one of the best restaurants in Savannah, GA) is bringing her bold Southern cooking to the Big Apple. Launching Thursday, January 21 and running through mid-April, the venue's first-ever takeout and delivery residency will feature a weekly rotating three-course menu from The Grey, which will be available for pickup and local delivery Thursdays through Sundays via Taste. Each meal will cost $65 (excluding tax, gratuity, and delivery fees) and will feature Bailey's signature take on Port City cuisine. Menus for the residency will be released every Monday and the first three weeks will include: Week of January 21 -- Smoked Catfish with Rye Crackers // Yardbird with Captain Sauce // Devil's Food Cake Week of January 25 -- Leeks Vinaigrette // Grilled Red Snapper // Butterscotch Cream Week of February 1 -- Crab Louie // Smoked Lamb // Brown Butter Fritter  To complement the food, a wine pairing package ($24) and à la carte cocktails such as a Chatham Artillery Punch are also available as add-ons. Orders will also include branded goodies like Bailey and Johno Morisano’s new book, Black, White & The Grey, an at-home pickling kit, and a free month of Netflix to stream Bailey’s episode of Chef’s Table.  Photograph: Peter Garrita

This Rockaway news may change your future beach trips

This Rockaway news may change your future beach trips

It's the dead of winter, but that doesn't mean we're not already thinking about summer. And one of our favorite warm-weather traditions is day trips out to Rockaway Beach—besides the sun, surf and people-watching, it's home to some seriously tasty eating and drinking options. But a concessions shake-up could mean your favorite boardwalk vendors might not be returning for summer 2021. Rippers at Beach 86th Street, Low Tide Bar at Beach 96th and Caracas at Beach 106th first came to the Rockaway Beach boardwalk in 2011, as a post-Hurricane Sandy boost for the area. Now, the NYC Parks Department has snubbed the decade-old concessions, which are managed by the locals-led Rockaway Beach Club, for a pricey 15-year bid from the folks behind Brooklyn Bazaar. (The latter already oversee the concessions over at Riis Park.)  View this post on Instagram A post shared by Rockaway Beach Club (@rockawaybeachclub) Not everybody's happy with the contract changes, which will include up to 20 new concession stands along the boardwalk in the upcoming years, as well as renovations to turn the existing structures into year-round dining destinations. Rockaway residents started social media and letter writing campaigns to the Parks Department and voiced their grievances at a public hearing on Monday night. The Bazaar team assured that they would work with existing vendors to maintain their boardwalk sites, reported Gothamist. However, the high-priced bid—$300,000 a year, w

Sex and the City may return without Samantha—and we have thoughts

Sex and the City may return without Samantha—and we have thoughts

UPDATE: 'Cue up that jazzy theme song, because it's official: Sex and the City is back, baby. Over the weekend, stars Sarah Jessica Parker, Cynthia Nixon and Kristin Davis all posted the same teaser to their social-media accounts. The teaser confirms a limited-series HBO Max reboot of the hit show, which will reportedly be titled "And Just Like That..." and will include 10 half-hour episodes of Carrie, Miranda and Charlotte exploring life and love in their 50s. The news also confirms rumors that Kim Cattrall will not be returning to the SATC universe. No streaming date has been given as of yet, but production is scheduled to begin this spring in New York City.  View this post on Instagram A post shared by SJP (@sarahjessicaparker) ---------------------Every few years, it comes around again: No, not chlamydia. Nope, we're talking about news that our favorite New York foursome may be returning to our TV screens. (Okay, maybe our second favorite New York foursome.) According to the New York Post, a reboot of Sex and the City may be in the works as a limited series on HBO Max, but there's one major problem: No Samantha. SATC stars Sarah Jessica Parker, Cynthia Nixon and Kristin Davis have all expressed interest over the years about stepping back into the Manolos of their famous characters Carrie Bradshaw, Miranda Hobbes, and Charlotte York. But Kim Cattrall—who played the frank, fabulous, and famously horny PR exec, Samantha Jones, on the HBO series and its tw

NYC is having its first-ever Restaurant Week To Go this winter

NYC is having its first-ever Restaurant Week To Go this winter

In happier 2021 news, one of our favorite local traditions is back. NYC & Company's NYC Restaurant Week returns this winter in a special new format: Running from January 25-31 (with an optional extension from February 1-7), Restaurant Week To Go will focus on great takeout and delivery options across all five boroughs. Local restaurants are invited to participate cost-free in the program, which will highlight a broad range of venues, from fine-dining stalwarts to casual pop-in spots. Participating restos like Gramercy Tavern, RedFarm, and Bar Boulud have already been announced. Each eatery will offer an entrée with at least one side dish for lunch or dinner at $20.21 a meal, to commemorate the new year. (Note: Tax, delivery fees and gratuity are not included in the meal price.) MasterCard holders have an extra incentive: The company is sponsoring the program, so diners who use their MasterCard will receive a $10 rebate for all orders.   “Even though we are still in the middle of this pandemic, it has never been more important to support the extraordinary restaurant industry that has long made New York City a dining capital and sustained the careers of countless families," says NYC & Company President Fred Dixon in a press release. "We invite New Yorkers to go ‘All In’ by ordering in or taking out during NYC Restaurant Week To Go." Most popular on Time Out - NYC’s MetroCard will be completely gone in two years- Eight ways Pixar’s “Soul” gets NYC right- The best events in NYC

20 local chefs forecast what's next for NYC dining

20 local chefs forecast what's next for NYC dining

From the death of indoor dining to the rebirth of outdoor eats, New York restaurants got one steaming-garbage surprise after another in 2020. Now, the city's cooking talents are looking to the new year with hopeful eyes, street smarts and some soothsayer foreknowledge. Here are the food-trend predictions, continued innovations and state-of-the-industry updates that NYC chefs and restaurant owners foresee for 2021.  Richard Zaro, founder of Cutlets Sandwich Co. "As we enter 2021, I expect we'll see diners continuing to seek out nostalgic comfort foods in an attempt to retain a sense of normalcy. Especially this winter, people will be looking to surround themselves with foods—lasagna, sandwiches, chicken noodle soup—that transport them to a pre-COVID sanity." Jonah Miller, chef-owner of Huertas "Last year, we started connecting with our guests in two brand-new ways for us, both which we think will be critical to our success in 2021: virtual classes and subscriptions. We teamed up with Table22 back in August to create Huertas subscriptions and have been really pleasantly surprised by their steady growth. These subscriptions have allowed us to expand our reach by delivering our favorite wines, cheeses and Spanish seafood conservas to diners all around the city and beyond." Nozomu Abe, chef of Sushi Noz and Noz Market "We believe that one of the main trends of 2021 will be the pursuit of sustainability. The team at Sushi Noz has committed itself to trying to be as sustainable as p

A Trader Joe’s is coming to Harlem

A Trader Joe’s is coming to Harlem

Trader Joe's, that grocery haven of frozen dumplings, peanut butter pretzels and hilariously shady line updates, is movin' on up—to Harlem, that is. The new location is the thirteenth in NYC, and the first in upper Manhattan. TJ's will occupy 28,000 square feet on the lower level of the upcoming Urban League Empowerment Center at 21 West 125th Street. The grocer joins a previously announced Target location, which will occupy 44,000 square feet of the 17-story complex. Alongside those retail giants, the center will house the Urban Civil Rights Experience Museum, New York State's first civil rights museum, as well as the headquarters of the National Urban League and office space for local non-profits including the United Negro College Fund, Jazzmobile and 100 Black Men, Inc. Expected to be completed in 2023, the development will also include 170 affordable rental apartments for low-income New Yorkers. “We are beyond thrilled to bring the National Urban League back to Harlem, open the first civil rights museum in the state, and now, one of most beloved grocery stores in the country alongside it," said S. Andrew Katz, principal of the Prusik Group, which is co-developing the project. “We're looking forward to welcoming the community to what will be a cultural and commercial hub for Harlem in 2023.”  Most popular on Time Out - New Yorkers say goodbye to the city’s most infamously chaotic McDonald’s- Eight ways Pixar’s “Soul” gets NYC right- The best events in NYC this January- The

10 NYC restaurants that are epically upgrading frozen dinner

10 NYC restaurants that are epically upgrading frozen dinner

New York restaurants consistently stepped up to the challenges of the pandemic, from constructing cool outdoor dining set-ups to pivoting to takeout and delivery operations to offering meal kits and groceries. And with winter here, it's officially stock-up season, and local restaurants are ready with frozen dinners and prepared foods that can be pulled from the icebox when you're feeling a little lazy. (Guilty!) Here are 10 tasty options that we'll be stocking our freezers with this winter:  Juliana's Launching January 14th via Fresh Direct or in-store pick-up and delivery, Patsy Grimaldi's pizzeria is offering take-and-bake versions of its most popular pies: Margherita, white, pepperoni, and Pizza Special No. 1 (mozzarella, scamorza affumicata, pancetta and scallions). Each pie has been par-baked in the shop's 800-degree coal-fired oven—the pizza arrives fresh but it'll freeze and reheat like a champ.  Mimi Cheng's Available for pick-up and delivery, the Frozen Dumpling Meal Kit ($67.50) from this family-run wonton den include 30 frozen dumplings in your choice of pork-and-chive, chicken-and-zucchini, or veggie flavors. Thirty hand-rolled scallion pancakes and a 12-ounce bottle of the restaurant's secret sauce round out the kit.  Brodo Broth Shop The West Village soup counter offers frozen 10-ounce and 22-ounce versions of each of its hearty broths, including grass-fed Beef, vegan Seaweed-Mushroom, and Spicy Nonna (chicken broth, roasted garlic, Calabrian chili paste). Buy t

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