Park Slope restaurant guide: The best places to eat now

Our Park Slope restaurant guide points you to the best places to eat in the neighborhood, from trusty favorites to the latest hot spots.

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Fifth Avenue is the nexus of the Park Slope restaurant scene. Our critic-approved list includes a longtime fixture that ranks among New York's best Italian restaurants, and Top Chef contender Dale Talde’s eponymous eatery, which reflects the current trend for cutting-edge Asian cuisine. There are also several bars with notable kitchens, including recent arrival Pork Slope.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Park Slope, Brooklyn

al di là

  • Critics choice

Aspiring restaurateurs in Park Slope should study this convivial Fifth Avenue pioneer. Nine-year-old al di là remains unsurpassed in the neighborhood. Affable owner Emiliano Coppa handles the inevitable wait (due to the no-reservations policy) with panache. The wait is worth it for co-owner and chef Anna Klinger’s Northern Italian dishes. It would be hard to improve on her braised rabbit with black olives on steaming polenta; even simple pastas, such as the homemade

  1. 248 Fifth Ave , (at Carroll St), 11215
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Beet

  • Price band: 1/4

Beet is a small word for a Park Slope restaurant with a big concept. Pat Rodsomarng, who owns Mango nearby, has opened a modern Thai eatery and is cooking both traditional dishes and his own French-inspired inventions. Every meal begins with a basket of beet chips and continues with your choice of salads, soups, noodles, dumplings, curries, or boozy innovations like cognac ginger beef or red snapper with champagne-vanilla butter sauce. The 40-seat room is beet-colored, too.

  1. 344 Seventh Ave, (between 9th and 10th Sts)
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Blue Ribbon Brooklyn

With the success of the Soho original, the French-trained brothers Bromberg opened this night owl draw in Brooklyn, offering up a clever mix of down-home cooking and haute cuisine, all available into the wee hours of the morning. A heaping plate of crispy fried chicken shares the menu with a tender duck club sandwich layered between homemade raisin bread and one of the best cheeseburgers around. The super-fresh raw bar boasts fresh oysters, clams, head-on prawns and lobster,

  1. 280 Fifth Ave, (between Garfield Pl and 1st St), 11215-19
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Brooklyn Fish Camp

We’ve been reminded by recent cinema gaffes like Bewitched and The Honeymooners that remakes of beloved originals rarely live up to expectations. Mind you, Brooklyn Fish Camp is no flop: Menu holdovers from the seminal Mary’s Fish Camp—the cultish lobster roll, rosemary-stuffed whole fish and succulent lobster knuckles—are as fresh and delicious at the spin-off as they are on Charles Street. And new additions like spicy calamari tossed with grape tomatoes and chickpeas

  1. 162 Fifth Ave , (at Hoyt St)
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Talde

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Critics choice

We expect a lot from our junior celebrity chefs—all those young guns chasing the spotlight on reality TV. Intense scrutiny awaits these aspiring showmen and women as they parlay their budding stardom into restaurants of their own. But while many who looked so good on the small screen have failed to live up to their promise (we’re looking at you, Sam Talbot), a few are now proving their true worth in the real world. Dale Talde, who came close to the title on two seasons of Top

  1. 369 Seventh Ave, (at 11th St), 11215
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Thistle Hill Tavern

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Critics choice

The neighborhood restaurant is a genre beloved by Brooklynites, whose Kings County pride is fueled by casual eateries---places where thoughtful food can coexist with reasonable prices and friendly service. There's obvious comfort to be found in the bond between regulars and their go-to filling station, but it can be a curse to the ambitions of a hungry chef. After all, how good can a neighborhood joint be if only the locals take to it? At first glance, Thistle Hill Tavern---the

  1. 441 Seventh Ave, (at 15th St)
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Stone Park Cafe

  • Critics choice

Chef Josh Grinker’s spirited menu is described by some as “contemporary” American, but he achieves his intensely rich flavors through the use of old-school ingredients. A thick pork chop is bumped up a notch with the addition of pork belly gravy, a mini hamburger benefits from silken short ribs and oily bluefish translates well when prepped as pan-seared cakes. From appetizers to desserts, Grinker sends out food that may not be flashy, but sure is delicious. A lively staff,

  1. 324 Fifth Ave, (at 3rd St), 11215-24
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Users say

1 comments
Vinnie
Vinnie

Time for Blue Ribbion to change it's menu, Good food just tired of the same dishes