Photography: A Victorian Sensation

Art, Photography
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Talbot’s home-made camera, 1840s: some of his early equipment appears to have been constructed to his design by the estate carpenter.
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The Ladder, salt print from a calotype negative: Plate XIV from Talbot’s Pencil of Nature, the first book to be illustrated with photographs, 1844-46.
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 The Open Door, salt print from a calotype negative: Plate VI from Talbot’s Pencil of Nature, the first book to be illustrated with photographs, 1844-46.
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Niagara Falls from the American side, whole plate daguerreotype by Platt D Babbitt, c.1855. Platt D Babbitt (1822-79) ensconced himself at a leading tourist spot beside Niagara Falls, from 1853.
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Portrait of a horse held by a groom, taken by a photographer of the London School of Photography, based at Newgate Street and Regent Circus, London, 1858-60, quarter- plate ambrotype.
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Gathering Water Lilies by Peter Harry Emerson, 1886, platinum print.
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‘The Armstrong Trophy and Naval Court’ by a staff photographer of the London Stereoscopic and Photographic Company (probably William England), 1862, stereo albumen prints from a wet collodion negative.
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‘Balmoral Castle from the N.W’, 1863, by George Washington Wilson, Aberdeen, stereo albumen prints from a wet collodion negative.
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Daguerreotype camera, made by A Giroux et Cie, 1839: this camera was bought by WHF Talbot in October 1839.
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Dr E W Pritchard, His Wife, Mother-in-Law and Family, by Cramb Brothers, of Glasgow, 1865, carte-de-visite.
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Exhibition exploring the development (no pun intended) of photography during the Victorian age, when the pasttime became a major craze.

Event phone: 0300 123 6789
Event website: http://www.nms.ac.uk

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Silvia C

I ve just seen this exhibition! It s the most wonderful that ive seen in much time. The curator was exceptional! It is a must see even if you don t love the photography. This is history...how we used to lived without images and how we became to this world full of images!