The best new movies to see this month

November brings on the Oscar hopefuls, with powerful new movies from the Coen brothers and Moonlight's Barry Jenkins
Green Book
Green Book
By Joshua Rothkopf |
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Looking for the best new movies to see this month? We’re way ahead of you: Here are the biggest and most essential big-screen releases coming to a theater near you over the next four weeks.

Best new movies this month

1
BOY ERASED
Photograph: Courtesy Focus Features
Movies, Drama

Boy Erased

Manchester by the Sea’s Lucas Hedges plays a Baptist Arkansas teen confused by his own same-sex longings. Brutally, he’s shipped off to a “gay-conversion” camp that bears similarities to a prison. The movie is unusually sympathetic, not only to its troubled main character but to his loving yet devout parents trapped by their own dogma (exquisite turns from Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe). Opens Nov 2

2
Movies, Comedy

Bodied

Researching the underground world of battle rap, a brainiac grad student (Calum Worthy) discovers his own aptitude for dropping rhymes, and crosses a line into racial insensitivity. Electric, explosive and frequently funny, the movie grabs the live wire of identity politics; it’s produced by Eminem who, in case you’ve forgotten, has already won an Oscar (for 8 Mile’s “Lose Yourself”). Opens Nov 2

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3
Netflix
Movies, Drama

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

Miss a new film by the Coens at your own peril. Their latest—an amusingly violent six-part comedy set in a highly stylized Old West—feels a touch like a placeholder after the darker riches of Inside Llewyn Davis and Hail, Caesar! But when Zoe Kazan shows up on the dusty trail as an evolving frontierswoman, the movie deepens into the kind of drama the brothers are capable of. Opens Nov 8

Time Out says
4
Movies, Horror

Overlord

On paper, it sounds like a run-of-the-mill midnight movie: Secretly, the Third Reich amasses an unholy army of undead mutants. In reality, Overlord has a lot more going for it, including a talented young cast and an artful plot that plays with the concept of monstrosity. Be prepared for blood, guts and gore, but don’t be fooled by the B-movie trappings—this one’s an A all the way. Opens Nov 9

Time Out says
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5
Photo: Twentieth Century Fox
Movies, Thriller

Widows

After their criminal husbands die in a score gone wrong, three grieving women—Viola Davis, Michelle Rodriguez and the flinty Elizabeth Debicki—pick up the thread out of necessity. Director Steve McQueen’s first feature since 12 Years a Slave is a supercharged, expertly tooled crime thriller that puts other female-centric capers like Ocean’s 8 to shame. Opens Nov 16

Time Out says
6
CREED II
Barry Wetcher
Movies, Action and adventure

Creed II

The first one was a bit of a surprise, not only for its subtle Sylvester Stallone performance but as evidence that the Rocky story still had a few more rounds in it. We’re not expecting Dolph Lundgren, returning here as Ivan Drago, to break us with his acting chops, but we trust in Michael B. Jordan to expand upon his impressive presence, post–Black Panther. Opens Nov 21

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7
Movies, Comedy

Green Book

Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali are the acting duo of the year in this rousingly fun period piece about a mob-connected NYC bouncer and the finicky black pianist he agrees to drive through the Jim Crow-era South on a music tour. Driving Miss Daisy it’s not, alternating ethnically rude belly laughs with an unflinching view of racism and a blooming spirit of national change. Opens Nov 21

8
Twentieth Century Fox
Movies, Drama

The Favourite

Ignore the buzz that already has this one leading the Oscar horse race and just let it function as the wonderfully catty and vicious period piece it was meant to be. In an 18th-century England that owes more to Stanley Kubrick’s fish-eyed Barry Lyndon than to reality, Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone duke it out for the affections of the fickle Olivia Colman, who plays their queen. Opens Nov 23

Time Out says
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9
Shoplifters
Movies, Drama

Shoplifters

Japan’s Hirokazu Kore-eda has tremendous respect for those living off the grid; he wants to restore a bit of their dignity. His devastating latest, about a makeshift household of mostly unrelated partners struggling to make ends meet, is one of his most accessible. The film stresses a deep message: Family is where you find it. It’s the year’s most compassionate movie. Opens Nov 23

10
Movies, Drama

If Beale Street Could Talk

Director Barry Jenkins’s return to the big screen after his surprise Academy Award win for Moonlight (yes, it really did end up on top) is an inspiring example of an artist following his own muse. He’s adapted James Baldwin’s 1974 Harlem-set novel into a challenging, diffuse drama that overflows with quietly powerful moments of tenderness. Opens Nov 30

Looking for more great films?

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