The best new movies to see this month

The last gasp of summer arrives in the form of a Predator remake, masterminded by The Nice Guys' Shane Black
The Predator
The Predator
By Time Out contributors, edited by Joshua Rothkopf |
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Looking for the best new movies to see this month? We’re way ahead of you: Here are the biggest and most essential big-screen releases coming to a theater near you over the next four weeks.

Best new movies this month

1
Movies, Documentary

Bisbee '17

An Arizona town with an episode of racist deportation in its past decides to re-enact the incident on its centennial, in this unflinching and timely documentary by Robert Greene, the formally adventurous maker of 2016’s Kate Plays Christine. It’s one of the most eye-opening films of the year. Opens Sept 5

2
Movies, Horror

The Nun

The Conjuring–verse spawns its second spin-off series (after the Annabelle evil-doll movies). This one plumbs the no-doubt-fascinating backstory behind a spooky oil painting of a clergywoman in desperate need of moisturizer. We’re only semi-kidding: This franchise has been unusually inventive. Opens Sept 7

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3
Movies, Documentary

Hale County This Morning, This Evening

Atmospherically captured, the everyday moments of a rural Alabama county yield small, precious vignettes of Southern life. Filmmaker RaMell Ross has an ambitious scope in mind, stretching backward into racism, but his trajectory is mainly deeper, toward an occasionally voiced yearning for self-betterment. Opens Sept 14

4
Mandy
Movies, Action and adventure

Mandy

Don’t argue with us: Nicolas Cage is in the prime of his career, doing crazy shit that asks him to go as bugged-eyed as possible (which is a lot). The Face/Off icon teams with retro-obsessed director Panos Cosmatos (Beyond the Black Rainbow) for this revenge fantasy set in an alternative 1983 informed by Tor paperback covers. Opens Sept 14

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5
Movies, Action and adventure

The Predator

Can an Arnold-less reboot survive our geeky expectations? We’ve got high hopes for several reasons. The first is writer-director Shane Black, still the wiseass screenwriter of Lethal Weapon and, more recently, The Nice Guys. Second, the deep cast makes room for Moonlight’s Trevante Rhodes, as well as such randos as Jake Busey. Opens Sept 14

6
Movies, Drama

White Boy Rick

This gritty crime drama from Yann Demange—recently linked with potentially directing the next Bond movie—tells the true story of Detroit resident Richard Wershe, Jr., who became an FBI informant at age 14 and a cocaine kingpin soon after. It’s a kids-do-the-darndest-things flick with actors like Jennifer Jason Leigh and Bruce Dern. Opens Sept 14

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7
AP/REX/Shutterstock
Movies, Documentary

Fahrenheit 11/9

The title of Michael Moore’s new documentary (or is it a horror film?) refers to the day in 2016 when the Associated Press called the election for Donald Trump. Even if you’ve grown tired of Moore’s shtick, you have to give him props for correctly sussing the anti-Hillary mood of his native Michigan long before that state turned red. Opens Sept 21

8
The Sisters Brothers
Movies, Drama

The Sisters Brothers

You don’t need a deep love of Westerns to get a kick out of Jacques Audiard’s wry, surprising and often plain hilarious frontier story set in 1851 Oregon and California. Sure, there’s all the gunslingin’ a genre aficionado could ask for, but at its heart is a road movie about a pair of bickering siblings (John C. Reilly and Joaquin Phoenix) who just happen to be bounty hunters. Opens Sept 21

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9
Movies, Documentary

Bad Reputation

This euphoric Joan Jett profile is a feature-length snarl that starts with feminism and goes deeper. A punk call-to-arms about being yourself, it has the purest No. 1 hit of the ‘80s at its center, "I Love Rock 'n' Roll." It also covers Jett's early tenure in the Runaways and extends beyond its subject's heyday. Opens Sept 28

10
Movies, Documentary

Matangi/Maya/M.I.A

It’s been more than a decade since the release of “Paper Planes,” a rifle-cocking, Clash-sampling amalgam that still sounds groundbreaking. The artist behind it, British rapper M.I.A., has burned a trail of controversy and forthrightness ever since. This experimental profile considers the woman behind the pop star. Opens Sept 28

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