CHIPS

Film, Comedy
1 out of 5 stars
CHIPS

Time Out says

1 out of 5 stars

This reboot of the '70s cop show about LA highway patrolmen is soul-crushingly unfunny

It’s not a fly-on-the-wall doc about your local fish shop. No, this horribly misguided Hollywood ‘comedy’ is actually a 21 Jump Street-style reboot of a dimly remembered late ’70s TV series about two mismatched Los Angeles motorcycle cops. But even if you’ve never seen the show, the movie version will fill you with fond nostalgia – for your last dentist’s visit, perhaps, or that time you stepped on a rusty nail. Any time before you found yourself in a cinema watching CHIPS.

There’s only one man to blame for this travesty: writer, director and star Dax Shepard, a leathery, low-rent Owen Wilson clone you might vaguely recognise from supporting performances in the likes of Idiocracy and Baby Mama. Here, he’s John Baker, a retired motorbike daredevil who has parlayed his expertise in the saddle into a new job with the California Highway Patrol. When crack FBI agent Poncharello (Michael Peña) is assigned to pose as Baker’s partner and infiltrate a gang of corrupt cops, nervous rookie Baker is thrown neck-deep into the action.

CHIPS is the kind of movie that thinks employing a running gag about homophobia will make it OK to feature a limp-wristed character called Gay Terry. It’s a movie that assumes that if you repeat ad nauseam an unfunny joke about ass-licking, it will magically become hilarious. It’s so grotesquely misogynistic it makes The Hangover look like Thelma and Louise: every woman on the California police force is either an object of trouser-rubbing lust or so old and ugly that they’re only good for a punchline.

Adding insult to injury is the fact that elsewhere Peña seemed finally to be getting the respect he deserved: turns in End of Watch and Ant-Man had given free rein to his effortless charm. But it’s going to be hard to forgive him for his mugging, grotesque performance here – once you’ve watched a guy break off screaming mid-wank at the realisation that he’s accidentally sex chatting with an older woman, nothing can ever be the same.

Details

Release details

Rated:
MA15+
Release date:
Thursday April 6 2017
Duration:
101 mins

Cast and crew

Director:
Dax Shepard
Screenwriter:
Dax Shepard
Cast:
Dax Shepard
Michael Peña
Adam Brody

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