0 Love It

Designs of the Year: the contenders

We round up our favourite contenders for the award that celebrates the most inventive design from the past year

1/11
Designed by Veronica Ditting

Pink and grey are always cool together, as shown in this issue of The Gentlewoman which features legend of stage and screen Angela Lansbury as its cover star.

2/11
Designed by Craig Green

Rising fashion star Craig Green plays with ideas of utility and function for his Autumn/Winter 2012 collection. Inspired by luggage carriers, the large wooden structures have connotations of religious pilgrimage and dwarf the models to create abstract, menacing silhouettes on the catwalk.

3/11
Designed by Heatherwick Studio

With its 204 copper petals aflame like a giant fiery sea urchin, Heatherwick Studio's design for the 2012 Olympic Cauldron wowed the world at the 2012 Games opening ceremony. We reckon it’s flamin' brilliant whether it wins or not.

4/11
Designed by Berg

This happy little chap is designed to live in your home, bringing you news, puzzles and gossip from your friends. In a natty combination of new and old media, Little Printer enables you to use your smart phone to set up subscriptions, which it will gather together to create a mini newspaper.

5/11
Centre for Vision in the Developing World and Goodwin Hartshorn

Designed by The Centre for Vision in the Developing World these self-adjustable glasses allow the wearer to tweak the lenses until they focus clearly. The specs are based on a fluid-filled lens technology developed specifically for use by kids and young adults who have no access to opticians.

6/11
Designed by David Kohn Architects, photo: Charles Hosea

A Room for London (nominated in the Architecture category) is a wonderfully whimsical temporary hotel room designed by David Kohn Architects in collaboration with artist Fiona Banner in response to a competition organised by Living Architecture. It looks like a boat washed up by a freak high tide on the Thames and has proved a poetic addition to the Southbank skyline, playing host to numerous artists, musicians and thinkers as well as paying punters.

7/11
Designed by Martin Wattenberg and Fernanda Bertini Viegas

The Wind Map shows the delicate tracery of wind flowing over the US using different shades to signify different speeds and directions in endlessly entrancing patterns.

8/11
Designed by Konstantin Grcic for Mattiazzi

Three types of wood – thermo treated ash, walnut and douglas – are joined at irregular angles to make the Medici Chair. We think it looks like a stylish update of the classic Adirondak chair and a pretty comfy perch.

9/11
By Random International

Random International’s Rain Room gives visitors the chance to experience how it might feel to control the rain. The trick is that due to the special sensors built into the structure, as the water pours down from the ceiling, you can stand in the middle of the shower and not get wet. During its Barbican Curve Gallery stint it offered a double-whammy of Britishness, being both weather-related and so popular that to see it you had first to stand in a lengthy queue.

10/11
Designed by Ben Wilson; photo: John Selby

It’s the steel beam that turns this compact bicycle, created by British industrial designer Ben Wilson, into a load-bearing donkey of a bike. Perfect for those gas bottle/terrier transportation dilemmas.

11/11
Designed by Renzo Piano

You can probably see it from your home, your office, and your bus on the way in to work. Towering over the rapidly regenerating London Bridge Quarter, Italian architect Renzo Piano’s omnipresent Shard has already made the transition from super-ambitious building project to hot new London landmark. Can it also scoop a ‘Design of the Year’ gong?


Polish your interesting specs and pause to marvel at the best design from the past twelve months. The Design Museum's Designs of the Year exhibition shows nominees in seven categories – architecture, digital, fashion, furniture, graphics, product and transport – and, as ever, it's a deliriously broad mix. Where else can you see The Shard, Angela Lansbury and a mini newspaper-maker all vying for a prize? Category champs and an overall winner – the gov.uk website – were announced on April 16, but why not tell us your favourite designery delight in the comments box below.

See more fantastic exhibitions in London

Animal Tales

This exhibition looks at the history of animals in storytelling, from ancient cave paintings to cat memes. A family trail and children's reading area will keep younger visitors busy.

Read more
British Library, Euston Until Sunday November 1 2015

Gnome & Away: Secrets of the Collection

The Garden Museum closes in October 2015 for a £6.6 million redevelopment before reopening in early 2017, but before the transformation period begins they're giving the public one last chance to see their brilliant collection of objects and artworks.

Read more
Garden Museum, Lambeth Until Saturday October 31 2015

Shoes: Pleasure and Pain

The V&A’s next summer blockbuster exhibition is all about shoes – and we aren’t talking ballet flats, cosy boots or erm… Crocs. 'Pleasure and Pain' focuses on the transformative power of extreme footwear, exploring the agony and ecstasy that a shoe might inspire. Over 200 pairs of shoes past and present have been gathered from all around the world.

Read more
Victoria & Albert Museum, Brompton Until Sunday January 31 2016

Alice in Cartoonland

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of the first publication of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland', this exhibition examines how cartoonists have re-imagined the book's characters. Work from the likes of Ralph Steadman, Nicholas Garland and EH Shepard features alongside political cartoons from Steve Bell and Martin Rowson.

Read more
Cartoon Museum, Bloomsbury Until Sunday November 1 2015

Nature's Bounty

This exhibition combines deliciously detailed paintings of the world's fruit, vegetables and edible plants with art drawn from some exceptional eighteenth and nineteenth-century books.

Read more
Kew Gardens, Kew Until Sunday January 31 2016

Tiger, Mog and Pink Rabbit: A Judith Kerr Retrospective

'The Tiger Who Came to Tea', has been delighting families since it was published in 1968. This exhibition looks at Kerr's experience as a refugee settling in London and how she became an artist and storyteller.

Read more
Jewish Museum, Camden Town Until Wednesday October 14 2015

Riviera Style: Resort & Swimwear Since 1900

The seaside has played host to some most extraordinary fashions over the years. Enjoy a full rundown of a century's worth of beach outfits at this exhibition of clothes for leisure, including such out-there gems as beach pyjamas, palazzo pants and burkinis.

Read more
Fashion and Textile Museum, London Bridge Until Sunday September 13 2015

Prize for Illustration: London Places and Spaces

The brief for this competition was to capture something of London's unique character using the city's places and spaces as inspiration. There sure are plenty of those to choose from, so visitors to this exhibition of the top 100 entries can expect to see an imaginative range of artworks, each of which will be accompanied by an explanation of the place or space which inspired it.

Read more
London Transport Museum, Covent Garden Until Sunday September 6 2015

Bloom

The Horniman's recently redeveloped Natural History Gallery houses this display of work by artist and academic, Edward Chell. The 40 painted panels on show are inspired by plants within the Horniman Gardens as well as rare books in the archive.

Read more
Horniman Museum, Forest Hill Until Sunday December 6 2015

Facing History: Contemporary Portraiture

How artists see themselves and us has captivated the public for centuries. Here the V&A brings together the works of 20 artists including Julian Opie, Grayson Perry, Thomas Ruff, Maud Sulter and Gavin Turk to form an overview of contemporary portraiture.

Read more
V&A, Brompton Until Sunday April 24 2016
Show more
Visit more exhibitions in London

Comments

1 comments
Daniel O'Farrell
Daniel O'Farrell

It has to be The Rain Room. Simply jaw-dropping. Sure, the aura of it is a lot more impressive to the reality, but it's still pretty darn good experience!