Sam Falls, "Light Over Time"

Critics' pick
1/7
Photograph: James Ewing; courtesy of the artist; Galerie Eva Presenhuber; Hannah Hoffman Gallery and Public Art Fund; NY

Sam Falls, Untitled (Maze), 2014

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Photograph: James Ewing; courtesy of the artist; Galerie Eva Presenhuber; Hannah Hoffman Gallery and Public Art Fund; NY

Sam Falls, Sam Falls, Untitled (Wind chimes), 2014

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Photograph: James Ewing; courtesy of the artist; Galerie Eva Presenhuber; Hannah Hoffman Gallery and Public Art Fund; NY

Sam Falls, Untitled (Scales), 2014

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Photograph: James Ewing; courtesy of the artist; Galerie Eva Presenhuber; Hannah Hoffman Gallery and Public Art Fund; NY

Sam Falls, Untitled (Thermochromic bench), 2014

5/7
Photograph: James Ewing; courtesy of the artist; Galerie Eva Presenhuber; Hannah Hoffman Gallery and Public Art Fund; NY

Sam Falls, Sam Falls, Untitled (Light room B), 2014

6/7
Photograph: James Ewing; courtesy of the artist; Galerie Eva Presenhuber; Hannah Hoffman Gallery and Public Art Fund; NY

Sam Falls, Sam Falls, Untitled (Light room B), 2014, interior

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Photograph: James Ewing; courtesy of the artist; Galerie Eva Presenhuber; Hannah Hoffman Gallery and Public Art Fund; NY

Sam Falls, Untitled (Light room B, photogram 2), 2014

Public Art Fund at MetroTech Center Commons, Downtown Until Friday May 29 2015 Free

A process-oriented Los Angeles artist who works in a variety of media, Sam Falls has transformed Downtown Brooklyn’s MetroTech Commons into a playground for his interactive art. Exploring the passage of time through light and color, Falls displays several sculptural works that are activated by the viewer and will physically alter over time. His Untitled (Thermochromic bench), for example, changes color due to heat generated by sitters or the intensity of sunlight. A maze has been painted with multicolored layers of powder-coated aluminum; one side has protective UV coating while the other doesn’t, so that the piece will partially fade from exposure. But as it does, another layer of paint will eventually emerge and regenerate the original color.

A set of teeter-totters feature geometric forms that collect rainwater, thus changing the distribution of weight. A giant wind chime is too big for an ordinary breeze to move it, so visitors do the job instead by pushing the chimes around. A more solitary experience is provided by a pair of white, aluminum shelters with tiny entrances and stained-glass skylights. The ambience within each of these “light rooms,” as the artist calls them, will change with the weather. Playful and thought-provoking, these laboratories of fun seek to engage the curious child inside all of us.—Paul Laster

Venue name: Public Art Fund at MetroTech Center Commons
Contact:
Address: MetroTech Center Commons, Myrtle Ave
Brooklyn

Cross street: between Flatbush Ave and Jay St
Opening hours: 24 hours daily.
Transport: Subway: A, C, F, R to Jay St–MetroTech
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