Best shops in Tribeca for fashion, home design and more

The best shops in Tribeca tend to focus on upscale clothing and design, but you'll also find a smattering of quirky one-offs.

Local retail reflects the affluent demographic in this celeb-heavy part of town. After perusing our list of the best shops in the nabe, browse designer basics at Nili Lotan and Christina Lehr, classy tableware fit for the area’s top restaurants at specialty shop Korin, and chic cycling accessories at one of the best bike shops in the city.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Tribeca, New York

Adeline Adeline

Critics' pick

You won’t find spandex shorts at this Tribeca bicycle shop, where owner Julie Hirschfeld offers a fashionable selection of European two-wheelers and snazzy accessories. The store allows shoppers to test ride bikes at nearby Washington Market Park or along the West Side Greenway path. We’re aching for a spin on one of the Pashley Princess Sovereign cycles ($1,295), which are built in the U.K. town Stratford-upon-Avon and come with wicker baskets, perfect for schlepping Saturday Greenmarket goodies. Gentlemen, meanwhile, might take to the Pashley Guv’nor one-speed ($1,595), an updated path racer from the 1930s, adorned with leather grips, a Brooks saddle and titanium rails. Sold? Keep your noggin in one piece with a lightweight Bern Berkeley helmet ($70).

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Christina Lehr

Knitwear designer Christina Lehr’s collection of basics could previously be found only in specialty boutiques like Steven Alan and Calypso, but it now shines in the brand’s first stand-alone shop. Lehr’s Danish background is reflected in the space’s Scandinavian-inspired interior of clean white walls and round tulip tables by Finnish furniture designer Eero Saarinen. The knitwear is all made in Belgium, and the spring pieces come in three styles: solid colors ($75–$150), stripes ($90–$180) and tie-dyes ($120–$190). Some of our favorites include tie-dyed A-line dresses ($169), thinly striped tanks ($96) and cotton capri pants ($119). Complete your look with a globally sourced accessory, such as rain boots by Japanese brand Saikai Toki ($139).

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Tribeca

Korin

Chefs and restaurant insiders have known about this kitchenware specialty shop since it opened in 1982. Lucky for us non–Top Chefs, the showroom finally welcomed the public in 2002, allowing anyone to snag Japanese- and Western-style knives ($30–$5,800) and specialty tablewares ($2–$600), like a plum-shaped soy sauce dish ($4). One of the highlights of the high-ceilinged space, lined with Japanese Shoji sliding wooden doors, is the opportunity to watch house knife master Chirau Sugai sharpen customers’ cutters (the service costs $15–$25) in a glass room. Sugai also offers free sharpening demo classes (Tue, Sat 2pm; reservations required), but before you get in on the action, score Misono Swedish steel knives with dragon graphics engraved on the blades ($65–$210) or Togiharu hammered-texture steel knives ($50–$150). If Martha Stewart is your homegirl, you’ll be itching to use the store’s eye-catchingly colorful printed plate sets (five for $29), Toruku Blue Nanban rectangle dishes ($13), cherry-printed chopsticks ($15) and Mishima Donabe flower-patterned ceramic pots ($25) for your next dinner party. Or make any pregame that much cooler by snagging a modern clear-glass sake carafe with a blue ice reservoir ($11).

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Tribeca

Mysterious Bookshop

Devotees of mystery, crime and spy genres will know owner Otto Penzler, both as an editor and from his book recommendations on Amazon.com. His shop holds a wealth of paperbacks, hardbacks and autographed first editions.

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Tribeca

Nili Lotan

Before moving to New York in 1980, Netanya, Israel, native Nili Lotan graduated with a fashion degree from the Shenkar College of Engineering and Design in Tel Aviv and served in the Israeli Air Force for two years. Her military background becomes evident in the crisp, structured garments she creates for her eponymous clothing label, which she launched in 2003. Each item features a label modeled after a dog tag, embellished with the words nl issue, followed by Lotan’s actual Israeli air-force ID number. Inside the designer’s hybrid store and studio, you’ll find wardrobe staples like solid scoop-neck tanks ($195) and V-neck camisoles with spaghetti straps ($195) alongside trendier garb, such as so-right-now floor-length washed-charmeuse silk skirts ($395). In a nod to her New York clientele, most pieces come in dark-hued solids; prints are almost nonexistent, save for ruffled silk camo skirts ($265) and men’s button-down shirts ($285) adorned with checks and stripes. You’ll also find that many garments—like a timeless motorcycle jacket with asymmetrical zippers ($480)—have a faded look, achieved through a complex process of repeated washing, followed by a softening treatment. Don’t miss Lotan’s series of flat, round sterling silver key chains ($88–$108) that are hand-carved in Israel and bear Hebrew inscriptions meaning “peace,” “love” and “good energy.”

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Tribeca

Patron of the New

Al Abayan headed the creative direction of the Tribeca location of cult Tokyo boutique Number (N)ine for eight years, until the store shuttered in 2009. Now he and his partner, Lisa Pak, lend their sartorial expertise to this new luxury lifestyle shop, also located in Tribeca. It’s easy to miss the red-columned storefront due to the small signage and the dark tinted windows, but it’s worth looking for the converted warehouse space, with its gold-leaf-speckled raw-concrete floors, to discover Abayan’s handpicked wares. The international collection of unique guys’ and gals’ clothing, accessories, beauty products and housewares is from obscure designers like Siki Im, Nicolas Andreas Taralis and Denis Colomb. Abayan says his pieces have an aesthetic that’s “polished with a bit of roughness” and appeal to discriminating shoppers seeking something outside the box. Korean-American menswear designer Siki Im’s wrap kilts ($530) and silk bomber jackets ($1,050) neatly hang on thin brass-and-steel racks, while hand-carved wooden wedge lace-ups from Parisian label Établissement ($1,450) are situated by the entrance. Most goods carry hefty price tags, but there are some affordable pieces, such as Helveta Voltag hand-carved wooden rings ($70) in vibrant jewel tones, Cousu de Fil Blanc spicy coffee-scented soaps ($18) in hand-sewn packaging and quirky Zilla leather-trimmed sponge envelope clutches ($95).

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Tribeca

Steven Alan

Critics' pick

Steven Alan's Tribeca flagship boasts a multitude of boutique brands for men and women, including cult-inducing Rag & Bone, Band of Outsiders and Engineered Garments in addition to its bevy of handbags, accessories and shoes.

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