Men’s boutiques in New York for affordable fashionable clothing

Take a shopping trip and refresh your wardrobe with fashionable finds—jackets, shoes, accessories and more—at these affordable men’s boutiques in NYC

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Alter

Alter


If your wardrobe is well-stocked with basics from chain stores and you want to add some sartorial flair to your look, check out the best men’s boutiques for fashionable wares—including jackets and cardigans, shoes for men, and accessories for men—that won’t max out your credit card.

RECOMMENDED: Best shops in NYC

Alter

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

A timeless, masculine style holds court at this Greenpoint store near the water’s edge, with threads dapper and traditional enough to suit a modern-day Paul Newman. Independent brands are the shop’s bread and butter—a single rack near the front holds a Kill City white button-down dotted with skulls and crossbones ($135), a Shades of Grey patterned tee ($55) and a Jachs blue-and-white striped oxford ($72). Punch up a straitlaced look with one-of-a-kind accessories: Alter’s in-house skittles-colored belts in solid reds, purples and greens ($38); fashionably rounded Spitfire sunglasses ($45); and Rotcho black biker gloves ($26).

  1. 109 Franklin St, (at Greenpoint Ave), 11222
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Brooklyn Industries

Brooklyn Industries

  • Critics choice

A reliable destination for wardrobe staples since 1998, this Gotham-based urban-apparel retailer now has 15 locations throughout the city. At the spacious Union Square flagship, descend to the whitewashed brick basement to find the brand’s specialty—sleek nylon messenger bags ($84)—along with a host of graphic tees ($28–$78), shirts ($40–$80), jackets ($60–$118) and sweaters ($50–$78). The focus may be on neutral basics, but a little digging turns up items with a bit more panache, like oxford shirts ($80) or tailored pants ($78). Suit up for fickle weather with an ’80s-style windbreaker ($98). 646-478-8871, brooklynindustries.com

  1. 801 Broadway between 11th and 12th Sts

Cadet

  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

Created by former Club Monaco fit specialist Raul Arevalo and his partner Brad Schmidt, this military-inspired brand’s new, foxhole-size East Village location (the original’s in Williamsburg) is decorated with scattered war paraphernalia (uniform hats, eagle statues, a West Point atlas). The store’s line of casual threads includes soft cotton T-shirts ($44) with designs both simple (striped) and unique (a star-encircled portrait of General Adelbert Ames). A hoodie with a notched button collar ($98) and the clean, simple lines of a white oxford shirt ($128) evince Cadet’s close attention to detail.

  1. 305 E 9th St, (between First and Second Aves), 10003
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Dave’s New York

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Presaging the craze for all things heritage, this family-owned store has been showcasing brands like Carhartt since 1963. The store’s focus on everyman-priced classic brands (Schott, Levi’s) attracts faux frontiersmen, in addition to a construction-crew clientele. Pick up a pair of Red Wing boots ($139–$289) near the entrance, before grabbing a classic Wrangler Western shirt ($30) or a slick navy-blue flight jacket ($95) from the Army-approved Alpha Industries line.

  1. 581 Sixth Ave, (between 16th and 17th Sts), 10011
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H.W. Carter & Sons

  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

This sedate apparel temple, scented with musky moisturizers from Baxter of California, is an Americana catchall.  Its namesake clothing line, plus standbys (Woolrich) and modern trendsetters (Mark McNairy), caters to a variety of looks. You’re a bit of a postmodern dandy? Try a gingham pocket square from Alexander Olch ($60) or a striped, slim-fit tee with raglan sleeves by Our Legacy ($100). For casual sportswear, look for Montana’s Epperson Mountaineering vintage-inspired tote ($115) or sandals from Engineered Garments ($140), with stars-and-stripes straps. The shop’s best find is a $50 henley from Mister Freedom, an L.A. brand you’re unlikely to come across elsewhere in the city.

  1. 127 North 6th St, (between Bedford Ave and Berry St)
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ID

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

This well-organized shop only carries a handful of brands, but with enough of a selection that a dandy could outfit himself from head to toe in one trip. Start with one of the old-fashioned patterned bow ties from General Knot & Co. ($88)—or if you’re short on skills, snag a clip-on version by Naked & Famous ($25). For the rigorously natty, pair your cravat with blue, white-edged Scotch & Soda suspenders ($25). A panoply of T-shirts resides by the front window, one emblazoned with a hand-drawn motorcycle from Iron and Resin ($36), another an orange-and-black striped crewneck from WeSC ($42). Bright, geometric short-sleeve button-downs ($79) from Penguin provide a burst of personality—don them with a pair of vibrantly colored khakis ($109) from Scotch & Soda.

  1. 232 Bedford Ave, (between North Fourth and Fifth Sts)
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Onassis

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Natural materials—raw-wood shelves, paper globe lanterns—dominate this open, airy store, the New York brand’s original location (there’s an outpost in Rockefeller Center). The beach-ready, preppy clothes evoke Hyannis Port, Massachusetts, minus the aristocratic pricing. Shorts ($58–$78)—ever the scourge of male shoppers—are well-cut here, neither too short nor too long. Muted colors abound, from faded sweatshirts ($98) to striped T-shirts ($48). This is also the place to get affordable accessories, including a classic belt ($50) or a fringed linen scarf ($58). Don’t be surprised if a salesperson asks if you want a drink—there’s a small café in the back of the store.

  1. 71 Greene St, (between Broome and Spring Sts)
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Only NY

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

At this breezy, laid-back store (the first retail location from the Harlem-based line) the small but well-curated selection means nothing feels inessential—unless of course you count the vintage fabric fanny pack ($38). The offerings, all from the Only NY brand, blend a streetwear sensibility with outdoorsy references for an idiosyncratic style. Skateboards ($50–$55) hang alongside an annotated, vintage bird poster, while T-shirts ($32) and sweaters ($56) bear graffiti patterns or renderings of ducks in marshes. The resulting look manages to combine modernity with your Dad’s closet.

  1. 176 Stanton St, (between Attorney and Clinton Sts), 10002
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Supreme

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

The cult streetwear brand—equally beloved by skate rats and rap stars—channels a stream of punkish pop culture through both its threads and its flagship digs. A big-screen TV in the front window plays selections such as Bruce Lee videos, while inside, funk music bumps on the speakers and comic-book-style art adorns the walls. Supreme’s famed baseball caps are a steal at $44 each and come in a variety of crayon colors. Once your head is spoken for, slip your feet into a pair of Converse All-Stars ($60) or Vans lace-ups ($66). Playful graphic T-shirts plastered with swear words also run as cheap as $32 each, and mirror the collection of rainbow-bright skateboards ($140–$160) on an adjacent wall.

  1. 274 Lafayette St, (between E Houston and Prince Sts)
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Topman

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

This popular British import offers runway-fresh clothes at reasonable prices in the basement of its U.S. flagship. While some of the items tend toward the costumey (we’re looking at you, denim short sleeve shirts with metal-studded collars, $68), you’ll be hard-pressed to find a slim black suit for $300 elsewhere in the city (upgrade to tweed for $500). Stop in to buy top-drawer essentials on the cheap—boxers ($15) range from classic navy with white dots to tongue-in-cheek selections such as an ice-cream-cone print with a waistband reading “Lick me” in cursive. Beat the hot weather with tanks ($14), tees ($36) and shorts ($60) or warm up if there’s a chill with tapered sweatpants ($62).

  1. 478 Broadway, (between Broome and Grand Sts)
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