Infographic: See how much New Yorkers shelled out for rent in January

Find out how much apartments in NYC were renting for last month, neighborhood by neighborhood, using data from rental-listings site Zumper

Photograph: Shutterstock

In depressing, but not-so-surprising news today, we learned that NYC kicked off 2014 as the most expensive city in the country to rent an apartment in. But what prices were apartment hunters contending with during the first month of the year? The folks at rental-listings site Zumper dug into their data trove to give us the scoop on median rents of apartments new to the market in January (note that these numbers don't reflect historical prices). They found that the median price, citywide, is $3,100 for a one-bedroom and $4,200 for a two-bedroom. Yikes.

As for the most expensive neighborhood? That's Tribeca, where the average one-bedroom listed last month will set you back a cool $4,000 every month. The same 'hood is also the priciest for a two-bedroom, with a whopping $6,600 median rent. Scroll down to see the median rent prices in January 2014 for popular areas from the Upper West Side toWilliamsburg.

 





 





Comments

8 comments
Jonathan D
Jonathan D

I live nearby in Westchester. I have always complained how much Westchester cost until today. Oh my God. Why on earth would anybody pay that much?!? Over by me, you can rent a HOUSE for significantly less, buy a cheap car and just commute. It is just my opinion, but I'd rather have land and not live ontop of other people. 

HipHopSays
HipHopSays

Jackie your wrong....if you live in (certain) low-income housing your income is used to calculate your rent which predicated on you shouldn't spend more than 30% (of your gross) income per month on housing. Rent controlled/stabilized units in the city is predicated on controlling the increase which is set by a board every year and attempts to cover inflation (4-6% annual increase usually). NYC overall uses a 'what the market will bear' approach .... So if an idiot is willing to pay 6k for a railroad apt next to the project they can legally charge it --- sadly there are a lot of idiots I the city (like those who live in the 100s and think they live in the Upper West Side or 'Manhattan Valley' instead of what it is - Harlem). This piece is talking about new construction rental prices inly it does not include most of the housing stock that makes up the city. It's actually a bad data set ....the city's office of planning collects median rental info as a part of the neighborhood census data collection which you can view online thru the NYC.gov site. In fact I use this data to ensure I don't get hosed on rents by brokers/landlords/etc when I move particularly between neighborhoods.

MD
MD

While I haven't lived in the city in 3 years, I lived in Brooklyn Heights, Spanish Harlem and Financial District and my rent in all of these places never came close to this. I was in a 4 bdrm in Spanish Harlem and when we moved out after 3 years, it was 3450 and we had multi-million dollar condos go up next to us during that time. In the Financial District, my roommate and I lived in a luxury apt building and paid $1850/mo. I currently have a friend living in Astoria that pays $1200 for a one bedroom. I realize this is medians and obviously the insane rent on condos, luxury, etc boost the medians but it's really not an accurate representation of the rent in the city.

Tyler
Tyler

I live in the"upper" part of UWS (Manhattan Valley...in the 100s) and really don't get why rent is so high in my neighborhood. The lease on my 3BR is coming up and my brother and I were thinking of ditching my roommate for a 2BR place, but somehow 2BR apts are just as expensive as 3BRs. There's really not much going on up here and there's a gigantic low income housing project smack in the middle of it (as well as a handful of other exclusively low income buildings). They really shouldn't expect people to pay over $1000 per person per month to live immediately next to the projects and all of the sketchiness that comes with it.

su robotti
su robotti

Do these rents include subsidized apt.s ? They are virtually 50% of the market, so, if not, this doesn't tell us much.

Jackie
Jackie

Unless you live in rent controlled and low income housing. They go by 30% of your income! Also the Bronx & Queens have much more affordable rents.

Rebecca
Rebecca

My roommates and I paid under the average for Murray Hill--still hurts though!

GR
GR

You know people do live north of Central Park, right?