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New York attractions: New places to go in NYC in the future

Find out what’s happening with New York attractions that are opening in the future, including the final section of the High Line and new spaces on Governors Island.

Photograph: Caroline Voagen Nelson

RECOMMENDED: View all the New Places to Go and New York Attractions in 2012

Learn about New York attractions and new places to go in NYC that will open in 2013 and beyond. We’ve got the details on new places, including the third and final section of the High Line, and the long-delayed 9/11 Memorial and Museum, plus photos.

Governors Island

What it is: Next year, large swaths of this island oasis will open to the public for the first time since the land became accessible in 2004.

Why you should care: Two words: Hammock Grove. Visitors will be able to relax in a shady enclave filled with hammock-strung trees. More active types can frolic in a new 14-acre area for play that includes two softball fields. These sections will be threaded together with 20-foot-wide paths for bike and pedestrian use. Most exciting, however, are the changes to the island’s topography. Built out of a landfill, it was originally designed to be flat. Soon, however, rubble from demolished buildings will be used to create an undulating landscape with curved, winding paths that increase the visual drama by alternately hiding and revealing breathtaking views of the Statue of Liberty.govisland.com. Opens fall 2013.—Jonathan Shannon

Ocean Wonders: Sharks!

What it is: Construction on this 57,000-square-foot building at the New York Aquariumis set to begin later this year. The approximately $127 million project will feature upwards of 100 species, including stingrays, sea turtles, fish and (yes, yes) sharks.

Why you should care: As the building’s name seems to scream: Sharks! The prospect of marveling at a host of underwater man-eaters (13 species in all) from a safe, dry distance sounds pretty awesome. (Aspiring oceanographers craving a shark-spotting fix, albeit on a much smaller scale, can view reef, nurse and sand-tiger sharks in the aquarium’s existing Sharks building—but go now, since it’ll close temporarily in the next few weeks.) The new exhibit is also part of the city’s Coney Island Revitalization Plan, an initiative to boost tourism in the seaside destination. The exterior will be covered in aluminum, creating a facade that’s meant to resemble a glimmering sea. The exhibit will face the Atlantic, and will be accessible via the Coney Island Boardwalk. Surf Ave at 8th St, Coney Island, Brooklyn (718-265-3474,nyaquarium.com). Opens spring 2015.—Tim Lowery

Whitney Museum of American Art

What it is: The institution is planting a seed in the Meatpacking District at the base ofthe High Line. Slated to open in 2015, the new space will showcase modern and contemporary art in both indoor and outdoor galleries.

Why you should care: The Whitney hasn’t made a gambit this big since it relocated to the Upper East Side in 1966. This new downtown extension, designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano, will comprise 63,000 square feet of gallery space over nine floors. (And outdoors—13,000 square feet of that space will be located on a series of rooftops.)  The building will be sandwiched between the High Line and the Hudson, so it won’t lack for stellar backdrops. A cantilevered entryway and asymmetrical shape are designed to make the structure blend seamlessly into the surrounding neighborhood’s industrial and natural elements. The new spot will allow the Whitney to display many more pieces from its collection of 19,000-plus works by American artists, as well as offer a sizable gallery for temporary exhibits. Gansevoort St at Washington St (whitney.org). Opens 2015.—Jenna Scherer

The High Line at the Rail Yards

What it is: The institution is planting a seed in the Meatpacking District at the base ofthe High Line. Slated to open in 2015, the new space will showcase modern and contemporary art in both indoor and outdoor galleries.

Why you should care: The Whitney hasn’t made a gambit this big since it relocated to the Upper East Side in 1966. This new downtown extension, designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano, will comprise 63,000 square feet of gallery space over nine floors. (And outdoors—13,000 square feet of that space will be located on a series of rooftops.)  The building will be sandwiched between the High Line and the Hudson, so it won’t lack for stellar backdrops. A cantilevered entryway and asymmetrical shape are designed to make the structure blend seamlessly into the surrounding neighborhood’s industrial and natural elements. The new spot will allow the Whitney to display many more pieces from its collection of 19,000-plus works by American artists, as well as offer a sizable gallery for temporary exhibits. Gansevoort St at Washington St (whitney.org). Opens 2015.—Jenna Scherer

The Lowline

What it is: Proving that city dwellers will never stop finding ways to create public space, this project, which was funded in part by a Kickstarter campaign, will be the first of its kind: an underground park built in a historic trolley terminal beneath Delancey Street.

Why you should care: Anyone who caught the temporary installation “Imagining the Lowline” in September—which transformed a patch of ground inside a dark LES warehouse into a verdant oasis—saw how cool this idea is. Cofounder James Ramsey has devised a system of “remote skylights,” which collect sunlight above ground and redistribute it below, so the space will actually support photosynthesis, essential to living greenery, and even respond to seasonal changes. The next step is for the team of architects, engineers and environmental designers to examine the microclimate of the proposed spot, test out the technology, see how different flora respond to the redirected light and tinker with the calibrations accordingly. Don’t make your subterranean picnic plans just yet—the process could take a year or longer. But given that the innovative concept seems transplanted from a distant future, the wait doesn’t seem so bad. Below Delancey St between Clinton and Essex Sts (thelowline.org). Opening date TBA.—Carolyn Stanley

Lakeside at Prospect Park

What it is: This massive new complex at the southeastern corner of Prospect Park is the first major upgrade to the green space in more than 50 years, and will add new elements—and acreage—to Brooklyn’s premier outdoor spot.

Why you should care: Closed since 2010, the former Kate Wollman Rink is getting a complete makeover. When it finally reopens in the fall of 2013, the renamed Lakeside complex will include a number of new amenities: two new ice-skating rinks—one of which will be covered, and will convert to a roller-skating rink in the summer—and  classroom spaces. Additionally, the new center will help restore this particular corner of Prospect Park to its former glory. Several of the Olmsted and Vaux–designed elements, such as Music Island, were destroyed when urban planner Robert Moses built the Wollman Rink in 1961; these will be restored, and the area will gain more than three acres of parkland. Plus, even more Brooklynites will be able to enjoy the space: The Prospect Park Alliance estimates that capacity will triple once the complex is completed. Enter at Lincoln Rd and Ocean Ave, Prospect Park, Brooklyn (prospectpark.org). Opens 2013.—Amy Plitt

Freshkills Park

What it is: The former site of the world’s largest landfill, located on Staten Island(we’ll save the jokes), is in the process of becoming a new green space. Upon completion, Freshkills will be nearly three times the size of Central Park. 

Why you should care: As the High Line and the proposed Lowline prove, New Yorkers will find a way to reclaim anything for parkland—and this massive dump, which was visible from space (seriously), is no exception. The master planning process to develop Freshkills began in 2003, and since then, proposals have been made for the north and south ends of the spot. Meanwhile, construction has started on Owl Hollow Fields, which will include four soccer fields and a pedestrian walkway, while Schmul Park (offering a playground and basketball courts) is already open. Those who are curious about its progress can get a preview on a Parks Department–led tour—the next one happens Saturday 20. Tours depart from Eltingville Transit Center, 90-98 Wainwright Ave at Richmond Ave, Staten Island (nycgovparks.org/parks/freshkillspark). Sat 20 10am–noon, 1–3pm; Nov 3 at 1pm; free.—Amy Plitt

The 9/11 Memorial and Museum

What it is: This institution devoted to the history and legacy of the September 11attacks was originally set to open in 2009, but arguments about funding stalled the process. Following public outcry over the delays, construction will begin again this year, and the museum has a projected opening date of late 2013 or early 2014.

Why you should care: In the decade since 9/11, plans for both the official memorial and the museum have moved forward fitfully. The 9/11 Memorial opened last year on the tenth anniversary of the attacks, but the museum’s debut seemed to be on indefinite hold, as the Port Authority and the 9/11 Foundation (overseen by Governors Andrew Cuomo and Chris Christie, and Mayor Michael Bloomberg, respectively) squabbled over who owed what money for its construction. But a little public shaming goes a long way: After The New York Times published an article in September detailing the disagreements between the two bodies, an agreement was reached and construction has begun again. Exhibits will feature artifacts from that day, as well as pieces of the former World Trade Center buildings, including the “survivor’s stairway,” which was used by office workers to evacuate on 9/11. 1 Albany St at Greenwich St (911memorial.org). Opens late 2013 or early 2014.

Comments

1 comments
surfer joe
surfer joe

High Line casts too many shadows and should b dismantlex to make way for more parking.