The 5 best affordable New York apartments (Week of July 8)

At just $1,000­ to $2,000 per person, these NYC abodes are actually worth the money

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New York City is a tough place to find an apartment, as everybody knows. It’s easy to panic that you’re not getting enough for your money, so we’re taking a weekly look at what you can get in this town for between $1,000 and $2,000 per month, per person. No one wants to end up in the world’s most depressing apartment (and equally, not everyone has the cash to get the kind of place Obama could afford to rent if he moves to New York), so take a look at these attractive, spacious places—but do it quickly, because these will be gone before you know it. Come back next week for more of our top picks from real-estate site Zumper’s inventory.

And if you’re curious, here’s what was available last week.

  • E 105th St #2A

    Three-bedroom in East Harlem, $2,500/month ($834 per person)

    As well as being an attractively laid-out apartment with hardwood floors and proximity to both Central Park and mass transit, this place costs considerably less than a grand per roommate, which, in NYC, makes it slightly rarer than unicorn poop.

  • E 105th St #2A

    Three-bedroom in East Harlem, $2,500/month ($834 per person)

  • E 105th St #2A

    Three-bedroom in East Harlem, $2,500/month ($834 per person)

  • E 47th St #DL88

    Two-bedroom in Midtown East, $3,600/month ($1,800 per person)

    Jumping up in price just a tad, this pad is nevertheless worth checking out for those with almost $2,000 to drop on rent each month. Huge kitchen, big windows, doorman, gym…you do at least get your money’s worth here. Relatively speaking, of course.

  • E 47th St #DL88

    Two-bedroom in Midtown East, $3,600/month ($1,800 per person)

  • E 47th St #DL88

    Two-bedroom in Midtown East, $3,600/month ($1,800 per person)

  • E 5th St, unit A

    Two-bedroom in the East Village, $2,100/month ($1,050 per person)

    For slightly over a grand each, you can get this place in the East Village. There isn’t much of a kitchen, but it seems to get decent light, and the bathroom looks like it was made for actual, living, full-size humans, which is a nice surprise.

  • E 5th St, unit A

    Two-bedroom in the East Village, $2,100/month ($1,050 per person)

  • E 5th St, unit A

    Two-bedroom in the East Village, $2,100/month ($1,050 per person)

  • Huron St #3A

    Two-bedroom in Greenpoint, Brooklyn; $3,600/month ($1,800 per person)

    Another more pricey option, this seems ideal for a couple in need of an extra bedroom to…put all their fancy hats in, maybe? Or a kid, whatever. With two bathrooms, a private terrace, a washer-dryer unit, a walk-in closet and a Jacuzzi, this is as grown-up an apartment as you’re likely to find in the rapidly overflowing-with-hipsters Greenpoint.

  • Huron St #3A

    Two-bedroom in Greenpoint, Brooklyn; $3,600/month ($1,800 per person)

  • Huron St #3A

    Two-bedroom in Greenpoint, Brooklyn; $3,600/month ($1,800 per person)

  • Union Ave

    Three-bedroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn; $3,395/month ($1,132 per person)

    Another win for those looking to move in with two friends, for a little over a grand per roommate, there’s this walk-up that claims to be a “short walk” (you can hope, right?) from the J, M and L trains. There’s a washer-dryer unit, a private roof deck and queen-size bedrooms. Slightly disconcerting is the phrase “photos are of a similar apartment,” but fingers crossed that similar means “actually similar” and not “Eddie Murphy’s room in Coming to America.”

  • Union Ave

    Three-bedroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn; $3,395/month ($1,132 per person)

  • Union Ave

    Three-bedroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn; $3,395/month ($1,132 per person)

E 105th St #2A

Three-bedroom in East Harlem, $2,500/month ($834 per person)

As well as being an attractively laid-out apartment with hardwood floors and proximity to both Central Park and mass transit, this place costs considerably less than a grand per roommate, which, in NYC, makes it slightly rarer than unicorn poop.


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