What makes you a true New Yorker?

We asked notable city dwellers to share their recommendations and advice.

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Kin Ying Lee

Kin Ying Lee


Kin Ying Lee, head designer for Madewell (madewell.com)
“Visit Brooklyn. You can’t call yourself a New Yorker if you have only seen Manhattan and not explored the other boroughs. This neighborhood is especially important to me because I live there with my family. It is where we landed after moving here from Ohio. I love Williamsburg for its industrial vibe. It is full of creative people and has become such a great place to bring up kids. There are amazing restaurants and cool boutiques. You get a bit more space, but it is still a hop away from the city.”

“[You can] get lost while discovering new places in Chinatown, but find your way to Amazing 66 (66 Mott St between Bayard and Canal Sts; 212-334-0099), Winnie’s (104 Bayard St between Baxter and Mulberry Sts; 212-732-2384) and Joe’s Shanghai (9 Pell St between Bowery and Doyers St; 212-233-8888, joeshanghairestaurants.com). Amazing 66 has a really incredible dish that’s a whole chicken stuffed with fried sticky rice. Winnie’s is a local, no-frills, low-tech karaoke spot (they still use laserdiscs). Plus the drinks are cheap, and you only have to pay $1 per song. Joe’s Shanghai has the best soup dumplings!”

“I felt like a true New Yorker when I found local spots that made me feel at home. Continuing to go to them makes me feel like part of the city and community, especially seeing the same faces all the time. Sharing my favorite places with my friends and family also makes me feel like I am a true New Yorker. Some of my favorite restaurants include Five Leaves (18 Bedford Ave at Lorimer St, Greenpoint, Brooklyn; 718-383-5345, fiveleavesny.com) for the food and atmosphere; Marlow & Sons (81 Broadway between Berry St and Wythe Ave, Williamsburg, Brooklyn; 718-384-1441, marlowandsons.com) for great breakfast, pastries and dinner; and Rye (247 South 1st St between Havemeyer and Roebling Sts, Williamsburg, Brooklyn; 718-218-8047, ryerestaurant.com) has an old-fashioned vibe with delicious, rich food. My top stores are Bird (316 Fifth Ave between 2nd and 3rd Sts, Park Slope, Brooklyn; 718-768-4940 • 220 Smith St at Butler St, Cobble Hill, Brooklyn; 718-797-3774, shopbird.com), an inspiring boutique with a beautiful selection of cool brands; Darr (369 Atlantic Ave between Bond and Hoyt Sts, Boerum Hill, Brooklyn; 718-797-9733, shopdarr.com), which has amazing antique finds; and Hollander & Lexer (358 Atlantic Ave between Bond and Hoyt Sts, Boerum Hill, Brooklyn; 718-797-9190 • 103 Metropolitan Ave at Wythe Ave, Williamsburg, Brooklyn; 718-797-9117, hollanderandlexer.net) for their aesthetic in men’s clothes. I also shop at 10 Ft. Single by Stella Dallas (285 North 6th St between Havemeyer St and Meeker Ave, Williamsburg, Brooklyn; 718-486-9482), a cool antique store owned by Japanese people that stocks American stuff and the latest vintage trends.”

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11 comments
nicnere
nicnere

Right. Of course, you're not going to publish that comment about fact checking the racial demographics of NYC. Great to be white and rich in NYC.

occupy TONY
occupy TONY

So, I suppose TONY now censors comments that do not agree with this offensive article. You'll just leave the one from the one profiled here to make this article palatable. That's ok, I have the screenshot of the unpublished comment. You're not the only one who has access to the internet and a blog.Welcome to Syria.

Soraya Darabi
Soraya Darabi

Hey guys, I'd like to jump in here to quickly thank the TIME OUT crew - who did an amazing job working with those who were interviewed. Lauren and their copy editing staff were professional throughout the wrangling process. Thank you to them for reaching out in the first place, for coordinating several busy schedules, and especially for taking the time to fact check. @Midwester Transplant Poster - Not that it matters (much) but I was born in Harlem and lived there until age 6, across from The Cotton Club. My father kept his NYC apartment until I was 14. He drove an NYC taxi cab - 1A57 - for over 25 years. I spent every Summer in the city until the age of 21, when I moved back permanently the day after college ended. AND, the best part of Minnesota is that locals are welcoming. I promise if you visited a friend there for a week and wanted to call yourself a Minnesotan, they'd let you.

OC
OC

I think this is an interesting list. However, as a native New Yorker, I am offended that there is not even one person of African descent on this list. This is not the first time I have experienced feeling excluded from Time Out. The selections you make are repeatedly geared towards white, middle and upper middle class New Yorkers(many of which are not "native New Yorkers". I suggest that Time Out reconsiders the demographic of New York City. It's a majority minority city. However, when people come to your website, they would think it is a predominately white city. It's not and it would be greatly appreciated if you represented and also catered to the tastes of NY's diverse population.

JOR
JOR

@ Peter even if Lauren gets fired, she'll just land another "journalistic writing " gig at either The Awl, Village Voice, or GothamShit -- blogs/publications about NYC written by non-new yorkers. Good to be white and beautiful in the insular world of NYC media. Kin Ying Lee said “Visit Brooklyn. You can’t call yourself a New Yorker if you have only seen Manhattan and not explored the other boroughs. This neighborhood is especially important to me because I live there with my family. Uhmm. have you explored other boroughs aside from Brooklyn? and "It is where we landed after moving here from Ohio." O.hi.o -- that.is. all How are the people profiled here notable city dwellers and true New Yorkers? You need to give yourself a timeout, time out New York.

not a mid westerner transplant
not a mid westerner transplant

"I spent junior high and school in Minnesota, and I went to college in Washington, D.C. I moved back to New York six years ago." If I were to say this same thing about having attended college somewhere else and then moving back to Minnesota, does not make me a Minnesotan. Definitely written by a New York transplant who thinks NYC is comprised of only rich white trustafarian yunnies transplants, and most likely Lauren is one.

Peter
Peter

Whoever wrote the article should be fired immediately

Peter
Peter

This article is a Joke... Nothing New York is mentioned here... Nothing neighborhood mention or how it was when I grew up (26) or when my parents grew up... This article is from a trendy dirty hipster wrote who makes it clear the know absolutely nothing ab real newyork....this is PATHETIC