Public Meeting: What's Wrong With The Queens Wharf Mega Casino?

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Public Meeting: What's Wrong With The Queens Wharf Mega Casino?
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Jonathan Sri, Councillor for The Gabba says
Lots of people are concerned about the Queens Wharf Mega-Casino, but no-one's 100% sure what the details of the development are or what the specific impacts of the project will be.

Join us from 6pm at the West End Uniting Church hall on the evening of Thursday, 2 March for a public meeting to learn more about exactly what the project involves, so that you're in a better position to talk to your neighbours, friends and family about it.

Our main speaker will be Richard Kirk, Queensland president of the Australian Institute of Architects.

The Queens Wharf project is one of the biggest developments in Brisbane history, and involves handing over 13 hectares of public land and buildings and a further 13+ hectares of river rights to a private multinational casino development consortium.

Different people will be concerned about different aspects of this project…
- the handing over of valuable public land to a private developer
- suboptimal public realm design outcomes
- the negative social and economic impacts of gambling
- heritage impacts on historic buildings
- the excessive height and bulk of the towers looming over the river
- the impacts of the unnecessary footbridge upon the South Bank riverfront
- environmental impacts on the river and mangroves
- the fact that residents have been given no meaningful democratic input into whether the project should go ahead

The deeper problem we face is that the property and gambling industries have far too much influence over our political system. Key politicians and developers are part of an elite network of influence in Queensland that means land is rezoned and mega-developments are approved to benefit a rich minority without offering any meaningful benefits to ordinary citizens. http://ftp.iza.org/dp9028.pdf

Building casinos and increasing the supply of privately owned inner-city highrise apartments is not improving housing affordability for low-income workers and families. We need local, state and federal governments to increase funding and support for the provision of public housing and affordable community housing.

Please spread the word and invite your friends.
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By: Jonathan Sri, Councillor for The Gabba