Inside Out

Film, Animation
4 out of 5 stars
4 out of 5 stars
(28user reviews)
Inside Out

Time Out says

4 out of 5 stars

Pixar's latest wildly inventive family cartoon looks at what goes on inside the mind of an 11-year-old girl

It’s all in the mind in Pixar’s latest, a delightful, frenetic, near-experimental animated film from the makers of 'Up' and 'Toy Story'. Pixar fans will be in seventh heaven with the film’s bold thinking—and kids will be straining to listen to imaginary voices in their heads—after diving into the mind of Riley, an 11-year-old girl whose tiny world is turned upside down when she moves from Minnesota to San Francisco with her mom and dad.

It’s a simple story, featuring a new school and nervous parents. But the real drama goes on in Riley’s head, where we meet Joy (Amy Poehler), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith), each of them sharing a physicality to match their temperament. Disgust gives great sneer, while Anger is red, squat and prone to shooting fire out of his head. We watch each of them fight for control over Riley’s life, and when Joy and Sadness go AWOL from their psychological HQ, we take a tour of some crazy mental byways, including the Abstract Thinking Department, where Joy and Sadness briefly become 2D characters and then, momentarily, one-color squiggles.

There’s too much to sponge up in one viewing. Blink and you’ll miss a character saying, “These facts and opinions look so similar,” when passing boxes marked FACTS and OPINIONS. We leave the subconscious ('where they take all the troublemakers') too quickly, and then it’s on to the Dream Department, where we see the day’s memories being adapted into drama. At times, you ache to put the brakes on the chaos, but still Pixar manages to do what it does best, turning the everyday rough and smooth of childhood experience into a thoughtful, inventive adventure, full of lurid and strange imagery yet still totally appropriate.

It’ll be interesting to see how young kids react. I imagine they’ll find it less confusing than their parents, and even if some of the more heady stuff goes right over their, well, heads, there’s always the Imaginary Friend—part elephant, part cat, all pink—to enjoy while the parents give each other a side-glance of recognition.

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Details

Release details

Release date:
Friday July 24 2015
Duration:
102 mins

Cast and crew

Director:
Pete Docter, Ronaldo Del Carmen
Screenwriter:
Pete Docter

Users say (28)

4 out of 5 stars

Average User Rating

4.1 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:11
  • 4 star:13
  • 3 star:4
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:1
LiveReviews|29
1 person listening
Tastemaker

A brave movie dealing with emotions, depression, anger and everything in between. It's a great concept, the emotions of a little girl are characters living inside her head, and there they work a fine balance and keep her memories safe, which ultimately make her personality. When her family move home and things start to go wrong, things also go awry inside her, which causes an emotional rollercoaster journey which I guarantee will make you shed a tear. A Disney Pixar masterpiece where even adults will learn a thing or too. It's okay to be sad!

Tastemaker

This is the best Pixar – by far.


Starting as a classic coming of age story, it develops into an astonishing piece. Not only is it very funny, it is also incredibly clever. Using all the different emotions as characters, it explores deeply what it means to grow up, to have your feelings evolve and to deal with life-changes.


Sure, it might be a little simplified, psychologically talking, but it hits home hard and reminds you of what it was like to be a child and to grow up. A masterpiece!

tastemaker

Okay, I admit it - I like animated films more than "real" ones, there you go I said it!

However I was surprisingly slow on the uptake for Inside Out - I did initially was going to see it at the cinema but my plans fell through and never got rescheduled, so I eventually bought it on DVD to enjoy at home. What a treat this movie is! Such a unique and bold concept from Pixar, I found it to be quite thought provoking in that we all have these emotions inside us and sometimes they do come out unexpectedly like when the smallest thing can set you off in tears or when you’re in a mood where everything make you angry, I thought the message was good in that we do need to express these emotions but create the right balance – I think this struck a chord with me particularly the demonstration of growth and development of ones personality over time – this is something that would resonate anyone who themselves suffer with difficult controlling emotions and potentially with audience members going through puberty when hormones can make your internal feelings skewwhiff. I’m not sure whether the idea could be a bit too complex for a very young child to grasp as it does obviously takes some understanding of different personalities and the emotions that contribute towards that, however I’m sure they could still enjoy the fun animation to an extent. There are lots of stimulants for older adults too, from passing quips to when we briefly delve inside the minds of Bailey’s mum and dad all make for lots of laughter! My favourite character was Disgust, I loved how she was personified as a sassy little b*tch haha

Tastemaker

I’m not embarrassed by the fact that I absolutely love animated movies, I think as an adult I appreciate them more than I did as a child. I really feel like this movie has more for adults than it does for children, having studied psychology for some time I can see the similarities between the movie and reality and I think its incredible. I also love how it teaches children (and adults) that its ok to embrace all your emotions and that you don't always have to be happy, it's not healthy after all.

 
Tastemaker

One of the most imaginative and intellectual movies I've ever seen, disguised as a kid's animated film. The emotional journey of an 11 year-old girl whose parents move her very reluctantly away from her beloved home to a new city will resonate with anyone, but it's the inner workings of a child's mind (not so far removed from an adult's mind) that really prove this film's worth and often astonishingly correct judgements. The film may be a bit long, and there is too much repetition, but this is one of those films that make you re-evaluate what matters to you. Forget the sentimental bits and just marvel on how much better it is at psychoanalysis than Freud was.

Tastemaker

A really nice, heart-warming film for all ages. Very cleverly done and entertaining, while tackling some complex coming of ages issues and feelings. Young viewers will adore the lovable cartoon characters, representing emotions in a young pre-teen girls head while adults will enjoy the subtle humour and may relate to a character or two! The story is simple and easy for children to follow, but engaging enough to hold the parents’ interest too. Finally a Disney film with no horrible monsters or disturbing death of a parent!

moderatorStaff Writer

Oh how I cried at this incredibly beautiful representation of a person's head. Pixar have always been wonderful but they've hit a new level of poignancy with this one, though if you'd prefer to turn a blind eye to the way Sadness represents herself in your head then it's just a plain old fun animation, and there's nothing wrong with that.

Tastemaker

Such a lovely film! The idea that there are little people living in your head, controlling how you feel and act, is just great. As much a film for adults as kids. Really loved this!

Tastemaker

An imaginative, daring movie. For one thing, it's rare to find a kids' movie that doesn't have a clear villain - making this a complexly structured film for the genre. It's also unusual to have such a doggedly normal female protagonist. And, of course, being an animated interpretation of theories about the subconscious mind makes this fascinating. Plus, it's all visually delightful.

moderatorStaff Writer

In a year full of massive releases – Mad Max, Star Wars, Jurassic World, Spectre, Pitch Perfect 2 – Inside Out is the one that has impressed the most. As with Pixar's other exemplary releases, this is a movie that feels, in a sense, perfect – there's humour, drama, sadness and, at the end of it all, a sense that you've been on an emotional and life-affirming journey. Another classic to add to Pixar's back catalogue.

moderatorStaff Writer

Marvellous film. Gives you a very powerful language to talk about inner life with your children. Extremely clever while highly entertaining. Really well researched, resulting in an informative film for adults too. Full marks!

Staff Writer

Very entertaining film. The Lava short film before Inside Out had my girlfriend in tears (and still does whenever I play the song to her) and the film itself was very well done. The animation for the emotions is fuzzy which was weird at first but sets it apart from the rest of the Plasticine-esque animations of other Pixar films.


I could relate to Anger most and loved his outbursts. Sadness was really irritating at first but had some good one liners. Everything works out in the end, of course, but the journey itself is very enjoyable.


Make sure you watch past the end for the respective emotions of the other characters doing their thing, very very funny.

Tastemaker

I really enjoyed the film, and like the others say- it's not just for adults! A very clever film, with such an interesting idea. The writers have thought of everything and I left the cinema with both tears of sadness and of joy. Talking of joy and sadness, they were two very annoying characters in my opinion, especially joy whose cheery, know-it-all demeanour really grates at times. Nonetheless, it's a fantastic film with a great story and a great message- I'll happily watch again.


When your thinking which character reminds you of people you work with then you know the film isn't working for you, bored.

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Tastemaker

What a cracking film. I'm not normally one for kids films, but being trapped on a long haul flight I thought I'd give it a go. I actually think it resonates more with adults than kids. In line with the characters of the film the story takes you through a whole roller coaster of emotions. A must watch!

Tastemaker

Not just a kid's film!! A really inspiring film about the messages we feed ourselves that lead to the sort of people we become and the way we act and the way we store our memories. I love the character's that live inside Riley's head. They are her back up team that have always been with her. It's really clever and well done. 

Tastemaker

Inside Out is such an entertaining, charming gem! It actually tackles some very complex issues and emotions in a way that is not just totally palatable, but very funny too. It is a great coming of age film and I defy you to not get teary towards the end. Absolutely lives up to the hype.

Tastemaker

It makes me so sad to say that I didn't enjoy this film. I think as an adult I have been spoilt by previous Pixar films being great for adults and kids alike but I did find this film was lacking some of the humour and spark of previous Pixar creations. The animation was beautiful but it's not a film I would bother watching again. My favourite part of the film was the last five minutes when you got to see in lots of other character's heads, I think is something that should have been utilised more during the rest of the film, but I appreciate that this might be a tad confusing for the younger viewers. So in summary I would recommend watching a previous Pixar great before settling down in front of this one. 

Tastemaker

Huge fan of Pixar's films. Unfortunately this one did not hold up to the genius of previous releases. Its humour and charm were welcome but also patchy. 


To be fair the film's narrative concept is tricky to execute well. I found myself questioning whether the universe and characters were really believable. But if you're not as assiduous as me, you'll find a good family flick to see.

Tastemaker

This movie really pulls at your heart strings. I almost want a sequel to see what is happening in either another person's head or what happens to the emotions in her head when she starts dating her first boy. All the voices of the characters are so good. And the way they've chosen to layout the insides of a mind is great. I love "understanding" what happens to memories. I wish it had been longer, or we had seen more of the parents' heads. 

Tastemaker

Uplifting and fun as with all Pixar's films, but with a serious message about our emotions as well. I really hope there's a follow up!

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Tastemaker

I really loved these 90 minutes at the cinema watching this film. I knew what to expect - a cartoon portraying emotions - but didn't expect to be gripped so much. When you think about it - these emotions affect everyone - disgust, fear, anger, sadness and joy. Children will enjoy it but I think only adults or older teenagers will grasp the concepts of how emotions play such a part in relationships. Definitely one to recommend!!

Tastemaker

Absolutely loved this film. Cute, uplifting and very very funny. Like many a Pixar film it's also very clever in its observation of how the human mind works. Knowing when to be serious, when to take us on a fantasy fairy-tale ride (perhaps the Disney influence there) and when to simply tell a story it delivered on all its promises.

Tastemaker

Good film, but the hype before the film made me think it was going to be better than it was.


The film is about 5 different characters that live inside a child's brain, which during the film shows that everyone has got the same 5 characters in different forms living inside them.  Especially liked the cat version of the characters.


It was quite clever in that the main learning point of the story wasn't was I was expecting it to be. It was a fun movie with some humour in it.


Definitely a good film to take the kids too, but no way near the best film you'll see this year/

Tastemaker

Are cartoons for children or adults? A common question, particularly when it comes to Pixar, frequently known for dipping their toe into themes larger than just pretty colours and 3D grandeur. Pretty much anything in ‘UP’ and the climatic scene of ‘Brave’ spring to mind. (Sniff).


‘Inside Out’ explores those deep feelings too, this time about the little voices in our head, and is done with the usual Pixar beauty and humour. There were a group of school kids who trooped in the row behind us, but by the end credits I was convinced the film had affected myself and my companion (both in our 30’s) more than all the children behind us. Not that there isn't anything in it for children, or course there is, it's hilarious and the characters are great, but the beautiful simplicity with the way it tackles the complex feelings of growing up is something you have to have been through to get, I think. And the kids growing up with this film will realise that in the years to come.


The best and funniest Pixar in years. Just don't talk to me about Bing Bong. (Sniff).


Tastemaker

Write a review...The film is almost a necessary view for anyone who’s interested in psychology. The way emotions work and how memory influences the 11-year-old protagonist – and everyone – are explained beautifully; and although mildly complex, it is never preachy.

As it is usual for Pixar movies, adults may have even more fun than the kids they are watching it with; but everyone will be enriched by the experience. 


The first time I realised that this film was released was at breakfast one morning when my 4 year old pointed out the little red man to me.  So I had no idea what to expect when I took her to see it.  The story is essentially about an 11 year old girl having to leave her home city and friends for another city and the emotions that this upheaval created.  Being a Pixar film, this emotional upheaval was depicted by 4 characters, Joy, Fear, Disgust and Anger (the aforementioned little red man).  For me, it was mildly entertaining, pretty clever in the way they you were made to think about the decisions you take and your own psychological makeup. Although there were plenty of characters thrown in in an attempt at keeping younger viewers who would struggle to follow the story line happy, I'm not sure that they were quite interesting and memorable enough.  Still, I didn't fall asleep and was mildly entertained and as for the 4 year old, she was just happy looking at the little red man.

Staff Writer

I had high hopes for Inside Out. From the trailer I thought it was going to deal with more harder hitting, topical issues about identity and the human psyche but alas, it was a nice tale about accepting all of your feelings. And though I sat there feeling a bit disappointed, I did remember that I am not the main demographic for this movie. 


When watching Pixar films, it's hard to remember that they're not essentially made for adults. It's not that adults are forgotten but we're not the ones who get the most out of it nor are we the ones who want the toys and merchandise (cynical, I know). So, with a fresh set of eyes while watching the film, I could see it for what it was - a fun, adorable story with great voice acting and absolutely brilliant animation.


Being a 31 year old woman, I should probably not admit that I cried during the movie but I did so well done Pixar. You've embarrassed me in public again.


It's not the strongest film in the Pixar arsenal but it's definitely a happy addition. The story has its faults, the topic is a bit safe but if it was made by any other animation studio, people would be raving about it not condemning it.

Staff Writer

The latest offering from the Pixar factory is a story of a 11yr old girl who’s uprooted and moved from the town she grew up and all her friends to loud brass very hipster place of San Fran but the catch her is that we see her story from her insides. In the film we meet her emotions who control and help her with everyday trials and tribulations. The emotions that we meet are- Anger, Fear, Sadness, Disgust and Joy the first emotion new born Riley creates. The story is very different from what we’ve become used to seeing from Pixar but it still has the magic and heart that made us fall in love with their previous work. On this adventure through Riley’s rollercoaster ride of change we are taught that being Joyful isn’t always the best.