Vu du front. Représenter la Grande Guerre

Art, Painting
Recommended
  • 4 out of 5 stars
0 Love It
Save it
 (Félix Vallotton (1865-1925), 'Verdun', 1917 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée)
1/14
Félix Vallotton (1865-1925), 'Verdun', 1917 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée
 (Eric Kennington (1888-1960), 'Gazés et blessés', 1918 / © Londres, Imperial War Museum)
2/14
Eric Kennington (1888-1960), 'Gazés et blessés', 1918 / © Londres, Imperial War Museum
 (Georges Scott (1873-1943), 'Effet d’un obus dans la nuit ou La Brèche', avril 1915 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée)
3/14
Georges Scott (1873-1943), 'Effet d’un obus dans la nuit ou La Brèche', avril 1915 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée
 (André Devambez (1867-1944), 'Avions fantaisistes', 1911-1914 / © RMN-Grand Palais / Hervé Lewandowski / © Adagp, Paris 2014)
4/14
André Devambez (1867-1944), 'Avions fantaisistes', 1911-1914 / © RMN-Grand Palais / Hervé Lewandowski / © Adagp, Paris 2014
 (Maurice Busset (1879-1936), 'Bombardement de Ludwigshafen', 1918 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée)
5/14
Maurice Busset (1879-1936), 'Bombardement de Ludwigshafen', 1918 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée
 (Félix Vallotton (1865-1925), 'C’est la guerre !', 1915-1916 / Collection particulière)
6/14
Félix Vallotton (1865-1925), 'C’est la guerre !', 1915-1916 / Collection particulière
 (James McBey (1883-1959), 'Nebi Samwîl : la première vision de Jérusalem', 1917 / © Londres, Imperial War Museum)
7/14
James McBey (1883-1959), 'Nebi Samwîl : la première vision de Jérusalem', 1917 / © Londres, Imperial War Museum
 (Karl Lotze (1892-1972), 'Attelage dans une explosion d’obus', 1915 / © Nanterre, Bibliothèque de documentation internationale contemporaine)
8/14
Karl Lotze (1892-1972), 'Attelage dans une explosion d’obus', 1915 / © Nanterre, Bibliothèque de documentation internationale contemporaine

046

 (Henry Valensi (1883-1960), 'Expression des Dardanelles', 1917 / © Nanterre, Bibliothèque de documentation internationale contemporaine / © Adagp, Paris 2014)
9/14
Henry Valensi (1883-1960), 'Expression des Dardanelles', 1917 / © Nanterre, Bibliothèque de documentation internationale contemporaine / © Adagp, Paris 2014
 (Jacques Villon (1875-1963), 'Soldats en marche', 1913 / © Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Georges Meguerditchian / © Adagp, Paris 2014)
10/14
Jacques Villon (1875-1963), 'Soldats en marche', 1913 / © Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Georges Meguerditchian / © Adagp, Paris 2014
 (Jean Galtier-Boissière (1891-1966), 'Fêtes de la Victoire : le défilé des mutilés', 1919 / © Nanterre, Bibliothèque de documentation internationale contemporaine)
11/14
Jean Galtier-Boissière (1891-1966), 'Fêtes de la Victoire : le défilé des mutilés', 1919 / © Nanterre, Bibliothèque de documentation internationale contemporaine
 (François Flameng (1856-1923), 'Guetteurs allemands équipés de cuirasses de tranchées et de masques à gaz', août 1917 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée)
12/14
François Flameng (1856-1923), 'Guetteurs allemands équipés de cuirasses de tranchées et de masques à gaz', août 1917 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée
 (Victor Tardieu (1870-1937), 'Ruines de Verdun', 1916 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée)
13/14
Victor Tardieu (1870-1937), 'Ruines de Verdun', 1916 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée
 (Aristarkh Lentoulov (1882-1943) et Vladimir Maïakovski (1893-1930), 'L’Autrichien a rendu Lvov aux Russes', 1914 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée)
14/14
Aristarkh Lentoulov (1882-1943) et Vladimir Maïakovski (1893-1930), 'L’Autrichien a rendu Lvov aux Russes', 1914 / © Paris, musée de l’Armée

‘Vu du Front’ provides insight to the First World War as witnessed by those who suffered it first hand – the soldiers who were also artists, photographers, sketchers and film writers. Despite the horrors of the wartime experience, those living through it felt compelled to bear witness ‒ to the point of hand-making their own cameras, sketching on old scraps of paper, or even painting on bones. Although amateur photography was forbidden on the front by the state, hundreds of images were captured anyway.

This exhibition is rich, precise and instructive. Pulled together with in-depth international research, it reveals the many different ways in which the 1914-1918 conflict was interpreted. Whereas in 1914, propaganda coloured most images of war (printed on postcards, posters or leaflets dropped behind enemy lines), soon enough the wartime came to be represented through bleak landscapes, grave-like trenches, and the dawning realisation of the extent of human waste taking place.  

From classicism to the avant-garde, many 20th century styles were used to convey the bloodbath. Jacques Villon related his experiences through cubism, whereas Félix Del Marle turned to futurism. Otto Dix coldly watched the war days roll by before creating his politically charged etchings ten years later, and in Fernand Léger’s work men and machines are permanently on the brink of breakdown. Félix Vallotton audaciously relates horror, for example by representing Verdun suffering the wrath of chaotic geometric lights. André Masson mulled over the happenings of the First World War for sixty years before putting to paper his dark memories of 1916-1917. 

Le Musée de l’Armée brings us to the frontline of savage human butchery in a poignant, thought-provoking exhibition.  

 

 

By: Mikaël Demets/MH

Posted:

Event phone: 08 10 11 33 99
LiveReviews|0
1 person listening