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Ben Walters

Ben Walters

Articles (3)

The 100 best comedy movies: the funniest films of all time

The 100 best comedy movies: the funniest films of all time

No film genre ages worse than comedy. A great drama will resonate through the ages. A well-orchestrated action flick will make viewers’ eyes pop forever, and a truly horrifying movie will scare viewers until the sun explodes. But what’s funny in 1922 might land with a thud in 2022. That’s to say nothing of varying tastes in humour. One person’s laugh riot is another’s ‘I don’t get it?’. That makes coming up with the best comedy films of all time tricky. In considering the movies on this list, we had to ask ourselves: what makes a truly great comedy? There’s many criteria, but one of the most important is the question of: ‘Is this film still funny now, and will it still be funny five years, ten years… a century from now?’ With the help of comedians like Diane Morgan and Russell Howard, actors such as John Boyega and Jodie Whittaker and a small army of Time Out writers, we believe we’ve found the 100 finest, most durable and most broadly appreciable laughers in history. No matter your sense of humour - silly or sophisticated, light or dark, surreal or broad - you’ll find it represented here.  Recommended: 🔥 The 100 best movies of all-time🥰 The greatest romantic comedies of all time🤯 33 great disaster movies😬 The best thriller films of all-time🌏 The best foreign films of all-time

The 100 best comedy movies

The 100 best comedy movies

The best comedies in the history of cinema achieve more than just making you laugh (although, granted, it’s not a great comedy if it barely makes you crack a smile). Classic romcoms like ‘Notting Hill’ have us yearning for true love while teen movies like ‘Mean Girls’ get us cringing at memories of being too dorky to join the cool gang at school (and ‘10 Things I Hate About You’ ticks both boxes). Then there are the political satires, like ‘The Death of Stalin’, which serve up uncomfortable truths alongside the funnies. And finally, when we need to get into the festive spirit, the Christmas film archives are crammed with titles that leave you giggling into your eggnog.  All of which makes choosing the 100 best comedies of all time a little tricky. To help us with the task, we enlisted the help of comedians (such as Russell Howard and Diane Morgan), actors (John Boyega and Jodie Whittaker, among others), directors and screenwriters (including Richard Curtis), as well as several Time Out writers. So the next time you need something to turn that frown upside down, you’ll know where to start. RECOMMENDED:  London and UK cinema listings, film reviews and exclusive interviews

Las 50 mejores películas LGBTTTI

Las 50 mejores películas LGBTTTI

El séptimo arte retoma temas de la comunidad LGBTTTI y crea historias en las que lesbianas, travestis y drag queens son protagonistas. Te decimos cuáles son, para nosotros, las mejores 50 películas LGBTTTI de la historia del cine. Recomendado: ¿Dónde y qué películas LGBT puedo ver en internet? y checa las 10 mejores películas gay en Netflix. 

Listings and reviews (1)

The Lion King

The Lion King

4 out of 5 stars

The posters have been plastered around the London Underground for years – long enough for this show to become the most successful musical of all time – but nothing prepares you for the sheer impact of 'The Lion King's opening sequence. With the surge of 'Circle Of Life' reverberating through your chest, Julie Taymor's animal creations march on, species by species. Gazelles spring, birds swoop and an elephant and her child lumber through the stalls. It's a cacophonous cavalcade that genuinely stops you breathing. You'd think Noah's Ark had emptied onto the stage. For a global blockbuster, 'The Lion King's absolute theatricality is astonishing. Techniques from all over the world – African masks, Japanese Kabuki costumes, Malaysian shadow puppetry – are smashed together in an explosion of spectacle. It's perfect for a musical, allowing both distinct flavours and an eclectic carnival spirit. Admittedly, things deflate when it sacrifices this defiant originality for subservient approximation of the film. Timon and Pumba (Damian Baldet and Keith Bookman), though impressively like their screen counterparts, step into the savannah from a different dimension. The hyena-infested elephant's graveyard swaps menace for goofiness and the famous stampede scene, so delicately handled and moving in the film, is merely ticked off with a sigh of relief. The familiarity of the film is a root cause of the show's commercial success. But, ironically, 'The Lion King' can't afford such compromises. I

News (1)

The Royal Vauxhall Tavern needs your help!

The Royal Vauxhall Tavern needs your help!

You might remember that last September, the Royal Vauxhall Tavern became the UK’s first LGBTQ listed building. Yay! Except now there are renewed fears that the property developers who own the site are trying to flog it off and it might turn into a chain pub. Boo! But RVT Future, the campaign to defend the Tavern, has a plan to keep it safe, and you can help. Yay again! For the uninitiated, the RVT is thought to be the country’s oldest LGBTQ pub and performance venue. It has a history of queer culture and community dating back to the 1950s if not earlier. It was at the forefront of the 1960s drag boom, it’s where Lily Savage cut her teeth, and it’s been Duckie’s home since 1995. They shot some of the new Ab Fab movie there. And let’s not forget the time Freddie Mercury and Kenny Everett took Princess Di out on the lash there dragged up as a boy. The pub made history by becoming a Grade II-listed building last year – but that protects the fabric of the building, not its use. Eventually, RVT Future wants to bring it into community ownership but for now owners Immovate aren’t playing ball. So what’s RVT Future’s plan? They want Lambeth Council to give the Tavern a special status called ‘sui generis’ (‘its own thing’), which would designate it an LGBT performance space regardless of who owns it. To convince the council, they need evidence that the pub has been used for shows for at least ten years. And that’s where you come in! Have you been to a performance event at the Tavern? G