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Emmanuel Chirache

Emmanuel Chirache

Emmanuel Chirache is Time Out's former Paris Blog & Community Manager.

Articles (36)

The best things to do in New Jersey

The best things to do in New Jersey

For the uninitiated, New Jersey might be regarded as not-quite-NYC, but the truth is very far from it. The best things to do in New Jersey include some of the best coastline views on the Eastern Seaboard (beaches!), plus the state is postivley dripping in history, from the gentrified brownstone beauty of Weehawken and Hoboken, down the coast to Jersey City and Liberty State Park, past Sandy Hook and Atlantic City. (We know you were wondering what is there to do in New Jersey at night.)  And did you know that the Statue of Liberty is actually in New Jersey? OK, yes, Liberty Island and a portion of Ellis Island are within the territorial jurisdiction of New York state, but still, the monument is in New Jersey waters. So what are the best things to do in New Jersey? The state’s huge—and frankly, underrated—cities are home to fabulous hotels and restaurants and vibrant art scenes. Deep forests with twisting trails make the outside world disappear. There’s the beach, which ranges from deserted island to laid-back urbane by the mile. Then, the world-class museums and heritage sites that tell the state’s story while maintaining a modern heartbeat. When you tire of one vibe, just hop in the car, load up the GPS and give your itinerary a remix. Being the country’s most densely populated state definitely has its advantages. RECOMMENDED: The best places to go wine tasting in New Jersey

OĂč voir du street art Ă  Paris ?

OĂč voir du street art Ă  Paris ?

Le promeneur parisien a eu le temps de se familiariser avec les Ɠuvres de street art qui pullulent dans la ville ces derniers temps. Depuis une dizaine d'annĂ©es, le street art parisien a beaucoup mĂ»ri, autant qu'il s'est institutionnalisĂ©. Des murs entiers lui sont ainsi dĂ©diĂ©s, comme celui de la rue Henri-NoguĂšres prĂšs du canal de l'Ourcq, un mur de la rue Oberkampf prĂšs du cafĂ© La Place Verte, celui de la rue Jean-Poulmarch le long du canal Saint-Martin, un autre rue d'Aubervilliers prĂšs du 104 ou encore devant le pavillon CarrĂ© de Baudouin dans le 20e. Certes, plusieurs hauts lieux du street art parisien sont aussi menacĂ©s, comme la rue DĂ©noyez, mais on note une tolĂ©rance et une banalisation vis-Ă -vis du graffiti urbain quand il est rĂ©alisĂ© par de grands artistes.  Chez Time Out, on adore ça ! On a donc dĂ©cidĂ© de bourlinguer dans tout Paris Ă  la recherche des meilleurs parcours de street art. PrĂ©parez-vous Ă  une belle traversĂ©e sous les bombes de peinture, entre graffitis muraux de Basquiat, pochoirs de Miss.Tic, virus pixĂ©lisĂ©s par Invader et stickers clandestins collĂ©s par Clet Abraham
 NB : Certaines des Ɠuvres prĂ©sentĂ©es dans notre dossier ont pu ĂȘtre remplacĂ©es ; Ă  vous de fouiner et de dĂ©couvrir vos propres pĂ©pites.

The 15 best hotels in New Jersey

The 15 best hotels in New Jersey

In this compact yet wildly diverse state, indecisive travelers can bring their most varied vacation fantasies to life with a multitude of things to do. Mountain-top adventure trips? Check. Lounge-by-the-sea days? Double check. From urban jaunts with rooftop bars to Instagram-worthy beach haunts, New Jersey packs it all in—and its best hotels have a strong sense of place. Maybe it’s a stylish farm tucked away in the verdant northwest, where the Delaware River creates a painted kind of light. Maybe it’s a city hotel with the best Manhattan views this side of
well, Manhattan. Or perhaps it’s all about escaping to the sea for a digital detox and locking your cellphone in the hotel vault. With options including Airstream trailers, safari tents, carriage houses or modern luxury with top-notch restaurant attached, it could be very hard to choose from our pick of the best places to stay, but, the cool thing about Jersey? It’s easy to mix it up, so you don’t have to choose.

The 15 best restaurants in New Jersey

The 15 best restaurants in New Jersey

You can tell a lot about New Jersey by the polarity of its nicknames. The Garden State. Dirty Jerz. But want to know a little secret? Both are a badge of pride. Locals know that this densely packed state has a ton of great things to do, not least of which is gorging on amazing food. Sure, New York and Philly are in Jersey’s backyard, and locals are happy to take advantage of that. But there’s no need to cross a bridge to find incredible meals. Book a hotel—and some world-class dining experiences—right here in Jersey. From affordable neighborhood joints to high-end temples recognized on the national scene, New Jersey’s restaurants reflect its ranking as one of the most culturally and socioeconomically diverse states in the nation. So, dust off any preconception that it’s all diners and pizza parlors—though they’re here, and amazing. In New Jersey, there are a million ways to feast.

13 best restaurants in Red Bank

13 best restaurants in Red Bank

Red Bank, New Jersey is a city of intersections. It has a Main Street Americana vibe, yet brags urban appeal, attracting artists and musicians. It’s a river town, but in shouting distance of the Atlantic coast’s waves. And when it comes to eating out, the city’s restaurant scene boasts laid-back creature comforts, buzzy spots with a see-and-be-seen vibe and everything in-between. While there are plenty of high-end offerings, Red Bank is laid-back enough to offset the glitz. Bonus: it doesn’t take itself too seriously. Case in point would be Jay and Silent Bob’s Secret Stash, a comic shop/pilgrimage point for fans of Jersey filmmaker Kevin Smith (it makes for a fun stop between courses). Paired with nearby Asbury Park and Long Branch, Red Bank is a tasty destination for the food-focused wanderer. Here’s where to dig in.

The 14 best things to do in Maryland

The 14 best things to do in Maryland

Maryland reveals its gems in a state of high contrast, from the otherworldly expanses of the Eastern Shore and its multi-generational watermen’s culture to the indie charms of Baltimore where the patron saint is John Waters. In a single day, you can watch the sun rising over the Atlantic, ogle art in the city and commune with nature in shouting distance of Northern Virginia’s grapevines. But why go so fast when there’s so much to savor? Maryland rewards those who take time to dig in. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere. Find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world.

The 15 best things to do in Delaware

The 15 best things to do in Delaware

Compact though it may be, Delaware is home to craft breweries, natural sites that feel far away from anywhere and a host of museums and estates. All you need to do is leave the highway, and the magic unfolds. Whether you keep it low-key, toes firmly planted in the sand, or glam up and head to the opera, you’ll feel like you’ve been let in on a secret. Venture out and feel sorry for those folks who never veer off Interstate 95. The First State – so named for being the first to ratify the constitution – rewards the intrepid. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere. Find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world.

The 15 best beaches in New Jersey

The 15 best beaches in New Jersey

In some places, beach towns all run together. Sky. Water. Sand. Check. Not so at the Jersey Shore. From retro swimming spots dotted with hotels, bars and restaurants to hidden beaches tucked just out of sight, the state’s best swimming destinations are big on personality and great things to do, kind of like Jersey itself. The coastal scene has legit beach cred. Case in point: The very first boardwalk in the United States graced Atlantic City’s oceanfront way back in the summer of 1870. In that sense, our collective idea of the American seaside experience has its origins here. Your mission: Swim. Sun worship. Repeat. Then on to the next. There are enough beach experiences here to fill a vacation
or a season.

Le meilleur du karaoké à Paris

Le meilleur du karaoké à Paris

Aujourd'hui, il est dĂ©sormais socialement acceptable de chanter devant tout le monde des tubes ringards. A l'Ăšre du tĂ©lĂ©-crochet gĂ©nĂ©ralisĂ© Ă  la tĂ©lĂ©vision, il Ă©tait finalement logique que chacun finĂźt par dĂ©fier les plus grands chanteurs, micro Ă  la main, cocktail dans l'autre. Certains croient d'ailleurs dur comme fer y jouer une potentielle carriĂšre dans le vedettariat, tandis que d'autres s'amusent simplement Ă  pousser la chansonnette sans se soucier du lendemain. De la mĂȘme façon qu'il existe plusieurs types d'amateurs de karaokĂ©, il existe diffĂ©rents types de karaokĂ©s. Voici une petite typologie que nous avons rĂ©alisĂ©e Ă  partir d'un Ă©chantillon Ă©clectique. Du karaokĂ© parisien Ă  l'ancienne, froid et touristique, au karaokĂ© branchĂ© Ă  la japonaise, en passant par l'ambiance survoltĂ© du Chinatown de Belleville, vous trouverez sans doute l'endroit idĂ©al pour chanter mal et vous laissez aller Ă  un lĂąchĂ© de micro, comme un vrai. 

Les films cultes préférés des Parisiens

Les films cultes préférés des Parisiens

Voici le classement des plus grands films cultes des Parisiens, réalisé d'aprÚs plus de 2000 votes des lecteurs de Time Out Paris. D''Alien' à 'West Side Story', en passant par 'Scarface', 'Pulp Fiction', 'Taxi Driver', 'Les Demoiselles de Rochefort' ou 'The Big Lebowski', les meilleurs films cultes d'hier et d'aujourd'hui se retrouvent et font la course !

The best new coffee shops in Paris

The best new coffee shops in Paris

With every month that comes and goes, a new coffee shop opens its doors. The specialty coffee market is flying high and Paris has become a hub for coffee lovers. Have a look at some of our new favourites which are dotted around the city. 

Listings and reviews (28)

Demain c'est loin

Demain c'est loin

5 out of 5 stars

What should I drink? A pint on the terrace. MĂ©nilmontant is still one of the best areas in Paris. And the tapas bar opposite from the Notre-Dame de la Croix church only strengthens its case. Authentic and affordable (€3.50-6.50 per plate), there’s patatas bravas, bocadillos with PoilĂąne bread, ham and mozzarella, sautĂ©ed shrimp, mini-chicken skewers and tortilla. To wash it all down, there’s a range of rums, cocktails and regularly changing well-priced wines. As if that wasn’t enough to keep you busy, there’s a free jukebox and when the weather is good, a charming little terrace bursting with flowers.

Bien Elevé

Bien Elevé

4 out of 5 stars

Whilst the vegan movement is picking up steam, the meat lovers certainly haven’t said their last words just yet. Having said that, the two owners of Bien ElevĂ© in the 9th don’t like to be referred to as just meat-loving carnivores. They define their cuisine as French-produced meat; such as Black Angus from ChateĂąuneuf in the north of France, a farm whose ethos is solely focused on the well-being of its livestock.  As you'd expect, most people come here for the meat, notably the beef - but don’t write off the fish. The catch of the day from Tom Saveurs is great and is well seasoned in a magnificent lettuce, celery and sorrel soup. But the stuff of kings here is red meat, meltingly tender rump steak, or 35 day matured professionally butchered rib eye in parsley sauce. It’s a complimentary mix of refined cuisine but with bistro tendencies, which is well thought out by the chef Thibault Eurin (previously of Caillebotte). The puddings are very tasty and well balanced, add an impressive wine list to match; and you’ve got all the ingredients for a very successful meal.

Fringe

Fringe

5 out of 5 stars

Photographer and coffee lover, Jeff Hargrove joined his two passions in life by opening his photography coffee shop Fringe, expanding on his book Paris Coffee Revolution, which he published last year. In this work with Anna Brones, the American tells the story of the rising specialty coffee scene in Paris from the start of around 2001 such as Coutume, BrĂ»lerie de Belleville or L’Arbre Ă  CafĂ©. Today the revolution is in full swing and good coffee is made commonplace. Make sure Fringe is one of your must-hits, a cafĂ© full of Scandi design. Jeff Hargrove is enthused by the art of decoration and he frequently invites artists from all walks of life to exhibit their work and paint on his walls. Fringe also supporters coffee-orientated artisans, by featuring speciality Parisian roasters. And it definitely pleases. The Kenyan espresso with its hints of fruit and chocolate is irresistible at €2.50. The aromatic cappuccino at €4.50, can be made with soya or organic rice milk. Your spirits will also be lifted by any one of the carrot, apple, orange and beetroot pressed juices; ,or cakes, biscuits and especially their sandwiches. The traditional Scandinavian open sandwiches both look and taste great. The regulars here affectionately greet the waitress, who in exchange does everything she possibly can to warmly welcome customers. We will certainly be heading back to the Fringe.   TRANSLATION: MAX CARLETON-SMITH

Bambou

Bambou

4 out of 5 stars

First thing’s first: Bambou is an incredible restaurant. An old textile workshop that amasses over 500m2, this Thai has proportions that are unusual for the otherwise tiny Sentier. Inside, you’ll find yourself wandering through different themed areas: a dining room with towering mirrors and plump sofas, and a spacious heated terrace. There’s also a billiard hall and a magnificant opium-style smoking room – the whole setup makes you want to return to explore all over again. Once you’ve chosen which realm you want to dine in, one of very likeable waiters will ask how you are and what you’d like. But that’s when the joy ends. There’s little astounding on the menu, apart from a few. Notable mention to the beef cheek Massaman curry (€19), steamed Durado in spicy sauce (€21) or the Bochot mussel and curry jam starter (€9). The rest of the menu was made up of the usual Thai classics - curries, soups, fried things, dumplings - which hadn’t been particularly reinvented by the chefs Antonin Bonnet et Benoit Rolland. And despite the good quality, the portions are a bit on the small side. There’s no set menu option, and the wine price is higher than you’d find elsewhere so your wallet gets a bit of a spanking. But all in all, Bambou is worth a trip for this insane dĂ©co. TRANSLATION: ALICE WHITE WALKER

Fitzgerald

Fitzgerald

4 out of 5 stars

Any bar named Fitzgerald inextricably links that age old combination – literature and booze. Nick Heys and Guillaume BĂ©nard have converted an old garage into a magnificent room dedicated to (at least one half) of that combination. It’s refined with a touch of speakeasy to it, as the bar is accessed through the restaurant. Flamingo wallpaper is wonderfully on-trend, adding an exotic Douanier Rousseau vibe. The bar is beautiful and the sofas are just the right side of squishy. The frequently-changing cocktail menu included a superb Smokey Negroni (€13) served chemistry lab-style in a glass carafe filled with smoke: gin, red Doli, and smoked Greek oregano bitters. For the indecisive, go for the signature cocktail (€13), a gin and tonic revisited with Tanqueray, grapefruit zest and Angostura bitters, or even the Zelda 2.0 (€13) – vodka, basil leaves, Saint-Germain liqueur and lime. There’s also a mocktail, aptly named “Pregnant” (€8) with cucumber slices, raspberry and passion fruit puree, ginger syrup and cranberry juice. This is a welcome addition to an otherwise stuffy, sleepy neighbourhood. TRANSLATION: MEGAN CARNEGIE

Brutos

Brutos

4 out of 5 stars

Ninon is French, Lucas is Brazilian and they go together like natural wine and wood-fired grills. After working in JoĂ«l Robouchon’s kitchen and for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Lucas Baur de Campos decided to open his own restaurant with partner, Ninon. The route to success was complex but after two years, they opened Brutos in early 2017, a few steps from square Gardette near Pere Lachaise cemetery. The 11th arrondissement has become quite the foodie area and the couple felt that Brutos would flourish nicely, what with its shabby-chic yet refined edge. The dishes are all in Spanish and so the better for it – sweetbreads and pork belly sound better in another language. Here’s the trick at Brutos: share everything and taste with your eyes closed. To start, we tried cassava-style patatas bravas and smoked beef croquettas with an incredible spicy guava sauce, before moving onto the staple natural wines and barbecue. They use an open pit barbecue style which is popular in Southern Brazil and varies the cooking of the meet depending on whether its on the edge, at the centre or the end. The result is a beautifully tender rib steak, dusted with cassava flour and a cachaça sauce. Alongside, one of the few veggie dishes: a turnip and cooked beetroot salad that will entice even the haters of these humble roots. To drink, a Gamay red and a fruity Coste Fere from Julien Peyras. The final bill is not cheap but it was worth every penny. Not a single foot was put wrong in the kitchen or

Generator Paris

Generator Paris

4 out of 5 stars

Rates: €23 in a dormitory and from €108 for a double room with a terrace Added extras: the hostel is located opposite the Communist Party headquarters, designed by Oscar Niemeyer Services: free Wifi broadband and a rooftop with a view of the SacrĂ©-CƓur They come in their masses. They're young. They're wild. They party and drink litres of beer every night. Who are they? None other than the Brits, Spaniards and Germans who descend upon Paris, ever since the youth hostel Generator put down roots on place du Colonel Fabien in February 2015. A colossal building which towers at eight floors high and includes 198 rooms and 920 beds, it might as well be a small village. The hostel also has its own restaurant, as well as a bar-club on the bottom floor and a cosy moroccan room for working, reading or just whiling away the time. The reception is open 24 hours and the staff speak eight languages. There’s even a travel shop to discover how to do the city like a Parisian, buy the Paris Museum Pass or find the best spots for lunching, shopping etc. Owned by the British group Patron Capital, Generator is a monster in the hotel industry, with hostels in London, Berlin, Rome, Dublin and even Barcelona, each one with a well-established strategy: reasonable prices, in a cool area, decor by up-and-coming designers who mix universal good taste with a local vibe (here, the Paris metro was the inspiration for the club, while Colonel Fabien gave his name to the cafe and the macaron which pops up in t

Cuillier (Sentier)

Cuillier (Sentier)

4 out of 5 stars

Obviously one Cuillier just wasn’t enough – a third location has opened its doors  in Sentier. In a moderately-sized space with dĂ©cor which is both austere and inviting, baristas welcome everyone with a smile and cheerfully explain the sourcing behind their signature Blend 21, a special range of coffee from the BrĂ»lerie de Belleville - 50% Brazilian, 30% Salvadorian, 20% Guatemalan - delicious as both an espresso and an Americano. As in all good coffee shops, choose how you want your coffee made, be it with a Chemex, a V60 or a Kalita. Accompany your coffee with their salads, bread and pastry selection, all priced at 6 to 7 euros. The choice may not be particularly sophisticated and the banana bread is a little too crumbly for our liking – but it’ss all rather tasty. And don’t hesitate to pick up a book from their library, whether you plump for the latest Schnock or the aptly titled Le CafĂ©, C’est Pas Sorcier. TRANSLATION: LEONIE CATER

Delirio

Delirio

3 out of 5 stars

For who? Those into their natural wine and coffee. What to order? The Delirio: a little sparkling water with a double espresso over ice.   The truth is we always wanted to write a good review of Delirio, a new Franco-Colombian address in the 11th. It’s easy to appreciate the kind people there and the hard working owners who pay a great tribute to both French and Latin American soil. It’s very easy to enjoy the cosy coffee shop atmosphere as well as doubling up as an intimate specialised organic wine bar. The Colombian coffee, ‘El Paraiso’, is also roasted on site. What’s even better is the multitude of coffee options: espresso, a classic cappuccino to the most amazing affogato, or even a double espresso with vanilla ice cream. Sadly the place does come with a few flaws, which aren’t by any means insurmountable. The food leaves a mixed impression, as in the empanadas are yummy, but the salads and soups are a little bland. There’s little to worry about on the homemade pastries. Then, the downstairs room isn’t the most convincing, as it plunges you into autumnal forest vibe, with its wicker chairs and wooden wallpaper as well as a fake tree planted in the middle. It’s probably a lot nicer in the summer, but the decoration gives off a wintery feel. Lastly, the thought of paying €9 for a glass of certain vintages in a place that can be a little too cosy at times is slightly off putting. There’s nothing disastrous here, but the competition is becoming tough for coffee shops in the

RĂ©publique of Coffee

RĂ©publique of Coffee

4 out of 5 stars

In case you missed the memo, Mexico has been quietly conquering Paris, with countless cocktail bars, restaurants and street food stalls now hailing the green, white and red tricolour. Great news if you like burritoes and guacamole, which is certainly the case at Time Out. But up until now, no one had thought to mix a coffee shop with Mexican gastronomy, which is exactly what Mexican chef Mario Flores is doing with his weekly changing menu. Formerly of two neighbouring bars in the 11th, CafĂ© Chilango and Chambre Noire, Flores rustles up burritoes, quesadillas and guacamole with seasonal organic fruit and veg. Sweet potatoes, kale, homemade chipotle sauce, three pepper tofu, Oaxaca cheese, Chioggia beetroot; trendy ingredients that are as tasty as they are beautiful. And the interior is an Instagrammer’s wet dream too – big glass windows, charming Parisian furnishings, white tiled walls, mirrored ceilings and flowers on each table. Coffee comes from excellent merchants The Beans on Fire, but expect regularly rotating blends and providers. The filter coffee is a very reasonable €3.50 and the €5 chai latte would go well with a pumpkin bread, cheesecake or cookie. There’s even viennoiserie, a rarity in third wave coffee shops. Had the heating not packed in, we would have stayed all afternoon; luckily, playing ‘Street Fighter 2’ on the Super Nintendo in the corner warmed us right up.  TRANSLATION: MEGAN CARNEGIE

Les Piaules

Les Piaules

4 out of 5 stars

Rates: €70 for a double room, €16 in a dormitory Added extras: The arcade games and photomaton. You can drink at the bar without being a paying guest, too. Services: free broadband Wifi and a rooftop view over Paris.   A cosmopolitan district, Belleville will soon hear new Italian, English and Spanish accents. A ‘made in France’ hostel, Les Piaules has thrown open its doors, complete with bar open for everyone from 7am to two in the morning. It offers a lovely selection of products from the area, including full-bodied coffee from BrĂ»lerie de Belleville at the unbeatable price of 2 euros and a plethora of Parisian beers (Bap Bap, Deck & Donohue, Demory), plus homemade croque monsieurs. The prices are affordable too, a pint of Saint-Omer is €5, €3.50 for glass of red wine, €3 pastries from Rachel’s, which can be enjoyed in a cosy corner cafe, nestled next to a stove, logs and books. In the corridors, big photo murals show the building works, proof of the progress and hard work that went into making it. From the rooms, you can see the streets of Belleville and La Villette, and even the SacrĂ©-CƓur and the Eiffel tower from certain spots. Those who manage to wangle a rooftop room will be overjoyed with the unobstructed view of the Paris’s most beautiful monuments and the terrace for lunching in the sun. The aim is to help tourists discover the area, and to experience things they wouldn’t do elsewhere. Les Piaules fits nicely into the landscape and with over eighty nationalities in

L'Echappée Belle

L'Echappée Belle

4 out of 5 stars

If you want to start experimenting with halal, or if you simply like this type of cooking, L'EchappĂ©e Belle is the ideal spot for you. Creators Rachid Kadi and François Bonte are big on attention to detail and have succeeded in making their restaurant a tranquil, convivial oasis. Wooden tables, lighting that changes depending on the time of day and tables set up for discreet socialising, plus beautiful white curtains to shield you from prying eyes. Everything is comfortable, design-focused and cosy. On weekends, a jazz pianist puts the final note on this harmonious combination. The menu, designed by former chef at la Bellevilloise, is all organic and seasonal. The flavours, especially in the starters of pumpkin soup and salmon tartar, really surprised us, and all meat is all sourced from the local halal butcher. The sublime desserts are revisited classics, such as cheesecake with red fruit coulis or pumpkin and ginger crumble. The menu changes often, no doubt with more infallibly delicious homemade delights. Those who want to continue the evening in a more discreet manner will be happy to learn that L'EchappĂ©e Belle has a little secret: a basement room for smoking shisha in beautiful armchairs. The Douanier Rousseau wallpaper gives the room a winter garden vibe and you can also watch sport on the big screens – which are strangely in keeping with the decor. Expect to feel well and truly escaped from Paris. TRANSLATION: MEGAN CARNEGIE