Stephen Garrett

Stephen Garrett

Articles (3)

The 100 best movies of all time

The 100 best movies of all time

What makes a great movie? We could try to come up with some rubric for determining if a film deserves to be considered one of the best ever. But the truth is that it’s all subjective, and one person’s Citizen Kane is another’s Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo, or vice versa. (Hey, it’s possible.) Everybody’s personal canon is different. It’s by individual taste, experiences and that intangible feeling that comes when a piece of art embeds itself in your heart. In other words, you know an all-time classic when you see it.One thing to consider, though? Rewatchability. The best movies truly do age like wine, and even the oldest films on this list will seem as fresh watched today as the day they first premiered. That’s why repertory cinemas play such a crucial role in film appreciation – seeing a movie on the big screen, decades or even a century after its initial release, is a significant means of differentiating the greatest from the merely great. And so, once you finish perusing our selection of the greatest films ever made, consider seeking them out at one of the world’s legendary cinemas, whether it’s the New Beverly in Los Angeles, Le Champo in Paris or Prince Charles Cinema in central London. You won’t regret it. Recommended: 🔥 The best films of 2024 (so far)🏆 The 100 greatest horror films ever made📺 The 100 greatest ever TV shows you need to binge🤣 The best comedy movies of all time

The best Los Angeles movies of all time

The best Los Angeles movies of all time

Naturally, there are a lot of movies set in Los Angeles – it’s literally where American movies come from, after all. And yet, ‘LA movies’ seem less exalted than, say, New York movies or Paris movies. Maybe it’s because the city is harder to romanticise than other major cities, what with all the traffic, cosmetic tweakments and obsession with kale. Whatever the reason, it makes coming up with a list of truly great LA movies a tough task. But the great ones are really great. In terms of tone and subject matter, they’re as sprawling as the landscape itself, covering everything from showbiz dramas and inner-city thrillers to fizzy musical comedies and shadowy noirs. Here are our all-time favourites. Recommended: 🗽 The 101 best New York movies of all time🌭 The 27 best Chicago movies of all time💂 The 32 best London movies of all time🥖 The 54 best movies set in Paris

The 100 best movies of all time

The 100 best movies of all time

Everyone has their favorites – that’s why any debate over what makes the best movies of all time can take hours (or, in our cases, a lifetime). Can there ever be one list to rule them all? A canon, as critics like to call it, updated with today’s game changers, that would glance upon all tastes, all genres, all countries, all eras, balancing impact with importance, brains with heart? The challenge was daunting. We just couldn't resist. Our list includes some of the most recognized action, feminist and foreign films. Please let us know how wrong we got it. Written by Abbey Bender, Dave Calhoun, Phil de Semlyen, Bilge Ebiri, Ian Freer, Stephen Garrett, Tomris Laffly, Joshua Rothkopf and Anna Smith RECOMMENDED:– The best movies on Netflix right now– The 100 best comedy movies– The best romantic movies of all time– The 101 best action movies ever made– The best documentaries on Netflix

Listings and reviews (1)

The Nightingale

The Nightingale

5 out of 5 stars

Multiple rapes. Infanticide. Aboriginal strange fruit. You’ve been warned. Brutal is too soft a word to describe ‘The Nightingale’, a brilliantly harrowing indictment of white male oppression set in British-ruled Australia circa 1825. If you thought Jennifer Kent pulled no punches in her terrifying supernatural debut ‘The Babadook’, brace yourself for the existential evil that lurks in the hearts of men – not figures out of a children’s storybook but a keenly observed sense of historical place. Newlywed mother Clare Carroll (Aisling Franciosi of ‘Game of Thrones’, hypnotically fierce), a convicted Irish street urchin sent to a Tasmanian penal colony, sings for randy, rum-soaked soldiers when she’s not suffering derision as a scullery maid. The local sadistic commander, Lieutenant Hawkins (Sam Claflin), helplessly infatuated with Clare, taunts her with the promise of freedom along with his special brand of toxic, self-loathing abuse. After learning that his only chance at promotion is a four-day trek to personally petition his superiors, Hawkins spitefully obliterates any chance of Clare’s happiness by attacking her and her family. The viciousness is off the charts. Left for dead, Clare is transformed into an avenging angel, enlisting a shrewd Tasmanian tracker named Billy (Baykali Ganambarr, sly and spiky) to help her hunt down Hawkins and his crew. And so begins a dark journey into the unmapped wilds of Van Diemen’s Land, where white devils plunder with impunity while a deva